Kingdom of Cochin

CochinCochin Royal FamilyMaharaja of CochinCochin kingdomCochin StateKochiKingdom of KochiKing of CochinPerumpadapu SwaroopamRaja of Cochin
Kingdom of Cochin (also known as Perumpadappu Swaroopam, Mada-rajyam, or Kuru Swaroopam; Kocci or Perumpaṭappu) was a late medieval kingdom and later princely state on the Malabar Coast, South India.wikipedia
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South India

Southern IndiaSouth IndianPeninsular India
Kingdom of Cochin (also known as Perumpadappu Swaroopam, Mada-rajyam, or Kuru Swaroopam; Kocci or Perumpaṭappu) was a late medieval kingdom and later princely state on the Malabar Coast, South India.
During the British colonial rule, the region was divided into the Madras Presidency, Hyderabad State, Mysore, Travancore, Kochi, Vizianagaram and a number of other minor princely states.

Pedro Álvares Cabral

Pedro Alvares CabralCabralPedro Cabral
King Unni Goda Varma Tirumulpadu (Trimumpara Raja) warmly welcomed Pedro Álvares Cabral on 24 December 1500 and negotiated a treaty of alliance between Portugal and the Cochin kingdom, directed against the Zamorin of Calicut.
From Calicut the expedition sailed to the Kingdom of Cochin, another Indian city-state, where Cabral befriended its ruler and loaded his ships with coveted spices before returning to Europe.

Perumpadappu, Ernakulam

Perumpadappu
The Nambudiri (the Brahmin chief) of Perumpadappu (not present-day Perumpadappu in Ernakulam District, but an area which includes Chitrakuda in Vannery nadu, of the present day Ponnani taluk) had married the sister of the last Later Chera king, Rama Varma Kulashekhara, and as a consequence obtained Mahodayapuram, and Thiruvanchikulam Temple along with numerous other rights, such as that of the Mamankam festival.
For the Perumpadapu Swaroopam, see Kingdom of Cochin

Princely state

princely statesIndian Princely Statesprincely
Kingdom of Cochin (also known as Perumpadappu Swaroopam, Mada-rajyam, or Kuru Swaroopam; Kocci or Perumpaṭappu) was a late medieval kingdom and later princely state on the Malabar Coast, South India.
The most prestigious Hindu rulers usually had the prefix "maha" ("great", compare for example Grand Duke) in their titles, as in Maharaja, Maharana, Maharao, etc. The states of Travancore and Cochin had queens regnant styled Maharani, generally the female forms applied only to sisters, spouses and widows, who could however act as regents.

Perumpadappu, Malappuram

PerumpadappaPerumpadappuPerumbadappu
The Nambudiri (the Brahmin chief) of Perumpadappu (not present-day Perumpadappu in Ernakulam District, but an area which includes Chitrakuda in Vannery nadu, of the present day Ponnani taluk) had married the sister of the last Later Chera king, Rama Varma Kulashekhara, and as a consequence obtained Mahodayapuram, and Thiruvanchikulam Temple along with numerous other rights, such as that of the Mamankam festival.
Perumbadappu was the original homeland of the Cochin rulers.

Portuguese Empire

PortuguesePortugalPortuguese colonies
Cochin became a long-time Portuguese ally (1503–1663) providing assistance against native overlords.
Profiting from the rivalry between the ruler of Kochi and the Zamorin of Calicut, the Portuguese were well-received and seen as allies, as they obtained a permit to build the fort Immanuel (Fort Kochi) and a trading post that were the first European settlement in India.

Thrissur district

ThrissurTrichurTrichur district
The Cochin kingdom (the Princely State) included much of modern-day Thrissur district excluding chavakkad taluk, few areas of Alathur taluk and the whole of Chittur Taluk of the Palakkad district and Kochi Taluk (excluding Fort Kochi), most of Kanayannur Taluk (excluding Edappally), parts of Aluva Taluk (Karukutty, Angamaly, Kalady, Chowwara, Kanjoor, Sreemoolanagaram, Malayattoor, Manjapra), parts of Kunnathunad Taluk and parts of Paravur Taluk (Chendamangalam) of the Ernakulam district which are now the part of the Indian state of Kerala.
In 1790 Raja Rama Varma (1790–1805) popularly known as Saktan Tampuran ascended the throne of Cochin.

Kerala

Kerala stateKerala, Indiastate of Kerala
The Cochin kingdom (the Princely State) included much of modern-day Thrissur district excluding chavakkad taluk, few areas of Alathur taluk and the whole of Chittur Taluk of the Palakkad district and Kochi Taluk (excluding Fort Kochi), most of Kanayannur Taluk (excluding Edappally), parts of Aluva Taluk (Karukutty, Angamaly, Kalady, Chowwara, Kanjoor, Sreemoolanagaram, Malayattoor, Manjapra), parts of Kunnathunad Taluk and parts of Paravur Taluk (Chendamangalam) of the Ernakulam district which are now the part of the Indian state of Kerala.
At the time of Indian independence movement in the early 20th century, there were two major princely states in Kerala-Travancore State and the Kingdom of Cochin.

Ernakulam district

ErnakulamEranakulam districtDistrict of Ernakulam
The Cochin kingdom (the Princely State) included much of modern-day Thrissur district excluding chavakkad taluk, few areas of Alathur taluk and the whole of Chittur Taluk of the Palakkad district and Kochi Taluk (excluding Fort Kochi), most of Kanayannur Taluk (excluding Edappally), parts of Aluva Taluk (Karukutty, Angamaly, Kalady, Chowwara, Kanjoor, Sreemoolanagaram, Malayattoor, Manjapra), parts of Kunnathunad Taluk and parts of Paravur Taluk (Chendamangalam) of the Ernakulam district which are now the part of the Indian state of Kerala.
The Jews, Syrians, Arabs, Chinese, Dutch, British and Portuguese seafarers followed the sea route to Kingdom of Cochin and left their impressions in the town.

Chittur-Thathamangalam

ChitturTattamangalamThathamangalam
The Cochin kingdom (the Princely State) included much of modern-day Thrissur district excluding chavakkad taluk, few areas of Alathur taluk and the whole of Chittur Taluk of the Palakkad district and Kochi Taluk (excluding Fort Kochi), most of Kanayannur Taluk (excluding Edappally), parts of Aluva Taluk (Karukutty, Angamaly, Kalady, Chowwara, Kanjoor, Sreemoolanagaram, Malayattoor, Manjapra), parts of Kunnathunad Taluk and parts of Paravur Taluk (Chendamangalam) of the Ernakulam district which are now the part of the Indian state of Kerala.
It was once part of the erstwhile Kingdom of Cochin.

Kochi

Cochincity of KochiKochi, India
After the transfer of Kochi and Vypin from Edappally rulers to the Perumpadappu rulers, the latter came to be known as kings of Kochi.
The city was later occupied by the Dutch and the British, with the Kingdom of Cochin becoming a princely state.

Battle of Cochin (1504)

Battle of Cochinbattle going on in CochinCalicut's assaults
For five months, Cochin kingdom was able to drive back Calicut's assaults, with the help of Pacheco Pereira and his men.
The Battle of Cochin, sometimes referred as the Second Siege of Cochin, was a series of confrontations, between March and July 1504, fought on land and sea, principally between the Portuguese garrison at Cochin, allied to the Trimumpara Raja, and the armies of the Zamorin of Calicut and vassal Malabari states.

Madras Presidency

MadrasMadras ProvinceMadras Government
The king brought a harbour engineer Robert Bristow to Cochin in 1920, with the help of Lord Willingdon, then Governor of Madras. Travancore merged with Cochin to create Travancore-Cochin, which was in turn unified with the Malabar district of Madras Presidency.
Madras Presidency was neighboured by the Kingdom of Mysore on the northwest, Kingdom of Kochi on the southwest, and the Kingdom of Hyderabad on the north.

Ernakulam

EranakulamVadakodeDistrict of Ernakulam
The Maharajah of Cochin initiated local administration in 1896 by forming town councils in Mattancherry and Ernakulam.
Ernakulam was once the capital of the Kingdom of Cochin.

Travancore

Kingdom of TravancoreTravancore KingdomTravancore State
Travancore merged with Cochin to create Travancore-Cochin, which was in turn unified with the Malabar district of Madras Presidency.
At its zenith, the kingdom covered most of modern-day central and southern Kerala with the Thachudaya Kaimal's enclave of Irinjalakuda Koodalmanikkam temple in the neighbouring Kingdom of Cochin, as well as the district of Kanyakumari, now in the Indian state of Tamil Nadu.

Dutch Malabar

MalabarDutchCochin
Portuguese alliance was followed by that of the Dutch, who had by then conquered Quilon after various encounters with the Portuguese and their allies.
The Kingdom of Cochin was an ally of the Dutch East India Company.

Travancore-Cochin

Thiru-KochiTravancore CochinTravancore-Cochin Legislative Assembly
Travancore merged with Cochin to create Travancore-Cochin, which was in turn unified with the Malabar district of Madras Presidency.
It was originally called United State of Travancore and Cochin and was created on 1 July 1949 by the merger of two former Princely States, the kingdoms of Travancore and Cochin with Thiruvananthapuram as the capital.

Afonso de Albuquerque

AlbuquerqueAlfonso de Albuquerquede Albuquerque
Soon after the time of Afonso de Albuquerque, Portuguese alliance in Kerala declined.
They engaged in several battles against the forces of the Zamorin of Calicut (Calecute, Kozhikode) and succeeded in establishing the King of Cohin (Cohim, Kochi) securely on his throne.

Sakthan Thampuran

Rama Varma IXShakthan ThampuranRama Varma Sakthan Thampuran
Rama Varma Kunhjippilla Thampuran (1751–1805), or Rama Varma IX, popularly known as Sakthan Thampuran (Sakthan meaning powerful), was the ruler of the Kingdom of Cochin.

Irinjalakuda

IrinjalakkudaIringalakudaIrinjalakuda gramam
In 1762 Maharaja Kingdom of Cochin formed Mukundapuram taluk by adding Mapranam nadu and parts of Nandilathu nadu to Mukundapuram nadu(Muriyanadu).

Kerala Varma III

Karkidaka Masathil Theepeta Thampuran (died August 1828) (regnal name: Kerala Varma III), popularly known as Virulam Thampuran, was an Indian monarch who ruled the Kingdom of Cochin from 1809 to 1828.

Chera dynasty

CheraCherasChera Kingdom
The Nambudiri (the Brahmin chief) of Perumpadappu (not present-day Perumpadappu in Ernakulam District, but an area which includes Chitrakuda in Vannery nadu, of the present day Ponnani taluk) had married the sister of the last Later Chera king, Rama Varma Kulashekhara, and as a consequence obtained Mahodayapuram, and Thiruvanchikulam Temple along with numerous other rights, such as that of the Mamankam festival. The Kingdom of Cochin, originally known as Perumpadappu Swarupam, was under the rule of the Later Cheras in the Middle Ages.
In the modern period, the rulers of Cochin and Travancore (in Kerala) also claimed the title "Chera".

Fort Kochi

Fort CochinFort ManuelFort Manuel on Cochin
The Cochin kingdom (the Princely State) included much of modern-day Thrissur district excluding chavakkad taluk, few areas of Alathur taluk and the whole of Chittur Taluk of the Palakkad district and Kochi Taluk (excluding Fort Kochi), most of Kanayannur Taluk (excluding Edappally), parts of Aluva Taluk (Karukutty, Angamaly, Kalady, Chowwara, Kanjoor, Sreemoolanagaram, Malayattoor, Manjapra), parts of Kunnathunad Taluk and parts of Paravur Taluk (Chendamangalam) of the Ernakulam district which are now the part of the Indian state of Kerala.
Kochi was a fishing village in the Kingdom of Kochi in the pre-colonial Kerala.

Malabar District

Malabardistrict of MalabarMalabar (India)
Travancore merged with Cochin to create Travancore-Cochin, which was in turn unified with the Malabar district of Madras Presidency.
The district lay between the Arabian Sea on the west, South Canara District on the north, the Western Ghats to the east, and the princely state of Cochin to the south.

Rama Varma XI

Rama Varma XI (died November 1837) was an Indian monarch who ruled the Kingdom of Cochin from 1828 to 1837.