Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria

GaliciaAustrian GaliciaAustrian PolandGalicia and LodomeriaGalicianKingdom of GaliciaGalicia-LodomeriaHabsburg GaliciaPolish GaliciaAustro-Hungarian Galicia
The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, also known as Galicia or Austrian Poland, was established in 1772 as a crownland of the Habsburg Monarchy as a result of the First Partition of Poland.wikipedia
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Cisleithania

AustrianCisleithania (Austria)Austria
From 1867 it was an ethnic Pole-administered autonomous crownland under Cisleithanian Austria-Hungary, until its dissolution in 1918.
It reached from Vorarlberg in the west to the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria and the Duchy of Bukovina (today part of Ukraine and Romania) in the east, as well as from the Kingdom of Bohemia in the north to the Kingdom of Dalmatia (today part of Croatia) in the south.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
From 1867 it was an ethnic Pole-administered autonomous crownland under Cisleithanian Austria-Hungary, until its dissolution in 1918.
Certain regions, such as Polish Galicia within Cisleithania and Croatia within Transleithania, enjoyed autonomous status, each with its own unique governmental structures (see: Polish Autonomy in Galicia and Croatian–Hungarian Settlement).

Volodymyr-Volynskyi

Włodzimierz WołyńskiVolodymyrVolodymyr-Volynsky
"Lodomeria", is also a Latinized form of Volodymyr-Volynskyi that was founded in the 10th century by Vladimir the Great and until the partitions of Poland was known simply as Volodymyr (Włodzimierz).
The mediaeval Latin name of the town "Lodomeria" became the namesake of the 19th century Austro-Hungarian Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, of which the town itself was not a part.

Galicia (Eastern Europe)

GaliciaGalicianHalychyna
The nucleus of historic Galicia consists of the modern Lviv, Ternopil, and Ivano-Frankivsk regions of western Ukraine.
It was once the small Kingdom of Galicia–Volhynia and later a crown land of Austria-Hungary, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, which straddled the modern-day border between Poland and Ukraine.

West Galicia

New GaliciaWestern GaliciaGalicia
Following the Napoleonic Wars and the Congress of Vienna, the Austrian Empire ceded portions of Galicia to the Russian Empire, West Galicia and Tarnopol District.
The Habsburg Monarchy, which had not participated in the Second Partition, now received a share that comprised the lands north of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria gained in the First Partition of 1772.

Galician Russophilia

RussophilesRussophileUkrainian Russophiles
* Galician Ruthenia (Галицкая Русь, Galitskaya Rus), Ciscarpathian Ruthenia (Прикарпатская Русь, Prikarpatskaya Rus), unofficial and propaganda names known in the Russian Empire and among Russophiles of Galicia
Galician Russophilia or Moscophiles were participants in a cultural and political movement largely in the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, Austria-Hungary (currently western Ukraine).

Congress Poland

Kingdom of PolandPolandRussian Poland
In 1815, as a result of decisions of the Congress of Vienna, the Lublin area and surrounding regions (most of the New or West Galicia) were ceded by the Austrian Empire to Congress Poland (Kingdom of Poland), which was ruled by the Tsar, and the Ternopil Region, including the historical region of Southern Podolia, was returned to the Austrian Empire by Russia, which had held it since 1809.
An equivalent to Congress Poland within the Austrian Empire was the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, also commonly referred to as "Austrian Poland".

Habsburg Monarchy

Habsburg EmpireHabsburgAustria
The Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, also known as Galicia or Austrian Poland, was established in 1772 as a crownland of the Habsburg Monarchy as a result of the First Partition of Poland.

Lviv Oblast

LvivLviv regionLvivska Oblast
The nucleus of historic Galicia consists of the modern Lviv, Ternopil, and Ivano-Frankivsk regions of western Ukraine.
In Ukraine today, there are three provinces (oblasts) that formed the eastern part of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria.

Ternopil Oblast

TernopilTernopil regionTarnopil Oblast
The nucleus of historic Galicia consists of the modern Lviv, Ternopil, and Ivano-Frankivsk regions of western Ukraine.
In Ukraine today, there are three provinces (oblasts) that formed the eastern part of the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria.

Agenor Romuald Gołuchowski

Agenor GołuchowskiAgenor GoluchowskiCount Agenor Gołuchowski
A decade of renewed absolutism followed, but to placate the Poles, Count Agenor Goluchowski, a conservative representative of the eastern Galician aristocracy, the so-called Podolians, was appointed Viceroy.
Count Agenor Romuald Gołuchowski (8 February 1812, Skala-Podilska, Galicia – 3 August 1875, Lwów, Galicia) was a Polish-Austrian conservative politician, member of parliament of Austria, Minister of Interior and governor of Galicia, and father of Agenor Maria Gołuchowski and Adam Gołuchowski.

Galician slaughter

Galician peasant revolt1846 peasant uprisinga peasant uprising against the Polish gentry
Polish manorial gentry supported or were sympathetic to barely concealed plans for an uprising to establish an independent Polish state, but peasants on the manorial estates of western Galicia, reduced to misery by poor harvests, saw little advantage for themselves in a free Poland and seized the opportunity to rise against the institution of serfdom, killing many of the estate owners.
The Galician Slaughter, also known as the Peasant Uprising of 1846 or the Szela uprising (Galizischer Bauernaufstand; Rzeź galicyjska or Rabacja galicyjska), was a two-month uprising of Galician peasants that led to the suppression of the szlachta uprising (Kraków Uprising) and the massacre of szlachta in Galicia in the Austrian partition in early 1846.

Ukrainian Greek Catholic Church

Ukrainian Greek CatholicUkrainian CatholicUkrainian Catholic Church
The Eastern Rite "Uniate" Church, which primarily served the Ruthenians, was renamed the Greek Catholic Church to bring it onto a par with the Roman Catholic Church; it was given seminaries, and eventually, a Metropolitan.
As a result of the reforms, over the next century the Greek-Catholic Church in Austrian Galicia ceased being a puppet of foreign interests and became the primary cultural force within the Ukrainian community.

Eastern Front (World War I)

Eastern FrontRussian FrontEastern
The Russian forces overran most of the region in 1914 after defeating the Austro-Hungarian army in a chaotic frontier battle in the opening months of the war.
So instead of four armies invading East Prussia, the Russians planned to send two armies to East Prussia, and two armies to defend against Austro-Hungarian forces invading from Galicia.

Ruthenia

RusRuthenianAll Rus
The name "Galicia" is the Latinized form of Halych, a principality of the medieval Ruthenia. Lviv (Lemberg) served as capital of Austrian Galicia, which was dominated by the Polish aristocracy, despite the fact that the population of the eastern half of the province was mostly Ukrainian, or "Ruthenian", as they were known at the time.
When the Austrian monarchy made vassal state Galicia–Lodomeria a province in 1772, Habsburg officials realized that the local East Slavic people were distinct from both Poles and Russians and still called themselves Rus. This was true until the empire fell in 1918.

Lodomeria

"Lodomeria", is also a Latinized form of Volodymyr-Volynskyi that was founded in the 10th century by Vladimir the Great and until the partitions of Poland was known simply as Volodymyr (Włodzimierz).
Lodomeria together with Galicia formed one of the many titles of the Emperor of Austria, "the ruler of Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria".

Revolutions of 1848 in the Austrian Empire

Revolutions of 1848Revolution of 18481848 revolution
In 1848, revolutionary actions broke out in Vienna and other parts of the Austrian Empire.
In 1846 there had been an uprising of Polish nobility in Austrian Galicia, which was only countered when peasants, in turn, rose up against the nobles.

Second Polish Republic

PolandPolishinterwar Poland
In 1918, Western Galicia became a part of the restored Republic of Poland, which absorbed the Lemko-Rusyn Republic.
On 6 November socialists proclaimed the Republic of Tarnobrzeg at Tarnobrzeg in Austrian Galicia.

Ivan Franko

FrankoI. FrankoI.Franko
The Great Economic Emigration, especially the emigration to Brazil, the "Brazilian Fever" as it was called at the time, was described in contemporary literary works by the Polish poet Maria Konopnicka, the Ukrainian writer Ivan Franko, and many others.
Franko was born in the Ukrainian village of Nahuievychi located then in the Austrian kronland of Galicia, today part of Drohobych Raion, Lviv Oblast, Ukraine.

Lviv

LwówLembergLvov
Lviv (Lemberg) served as capital of Austrian Galicia, which was dominated by the Polish aristocracy, despite the fact that the population of the eastern half of the province was mostly Ukrainian, or "Ruthenian", as they were known at the time.
In 1772, after the First Partition of Poland, the city became the capital of the Habsburg Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria.

Ruthenians

RuthenianRuthenesRusyns
Meanwhile, the Ruthenians felt more and more abandoned by Vienna and among the "Old Ruthenians" grouped around the Greek Catholic Cathedral of Saint George, there occurred a turn towards Russia.
After the partition of Poland the term Ruthenian referred exclusively to people of the Rusyn- and Ukrainian-speaking areas of the Austro-Hungarian Empire, especially in the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria, Bukovina, and Transcarpathia.

Poland

PolishPOLRepublic of Poland
This historical region in Eastern Europe is divided today between Poland and Ukraine.
After the partitions of Poland at the end of the 18th century, the bulk of the ethnic Polish population was primarily located in Congress Poland, and in the Galicia and Poznań provinces.

Central Powers

Central PowerCentralenemy
During the First World War Galicia saw heavy fighting between the forces of Russia and the Central Powers.
Austrian Cisleithania contained various duchies and principalities but also the Kingdom of Bohemia, the Kingdom of Dalmatia, the Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria.

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
In 1804 it became a crownland of the Austrian Empire.

Principality of Halych

HalychPrince of HalychHalychian Rus
The name "Galicia" is the Latinized form of Halych, a principality of the medieval Ruthenia.
In 1772, Halychia was attached to the Austrian Empire within which it existed as an administrative unit called "Kingdom of Galicia and Lodomeria" with the center in Lviv.