Kingdom of Hungary

HungaryHungarianHungariansHungarian KingdomKing of Hungarymedieval Kingdom of HungaryGreater HungaryHungarian crownHungarian EmpireHungarian king
The Kingdom of Hungary was a monarchy in Central Europe that existed from the Middle Ages into the twentieth century (1000–1946 with the exception of 1918–1920).wikipedia
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Árpád dynasty

ÁrpádÁrpádsHouse of Árpád
The Principality of Hungary emerged as a Christian kingdom upon the coronation of the first king Stephen I at Esztergom in about the year 1000; his family (the Árpád dynasty) led the monarchy for 300 years.
The Árpáds or Arpads (Árpádok, Arpadovići, Арпадовци, Arpádovci) was the ruling dynasty of the Principality of Hungary in the 9th and 10th centuries and of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1000 to 1301.

Coronation of the Hungarian monarch

coronationcrownedHungarian coronation
The Principality of Hungary emerged as a Christian kingdom upon the coronation of the first king Stephen I at Esztergom in about the year 1000; his family (the Árpád dynasty) led the monarchy for 300 years.
The Coronation of the Hungarian monarch was a ceremony in which the king or queen of the Kingdom of Hungary was formally crowned and invested with regalia.

Kingdom of Hungary (1526–1867)

Kingdom of HungaryHungaryHabsburg Kingdom of Hungary
Due to the Ottoman occupation of the central and southern territories of Hungary in the 16th century, the country was partitioned into three parts: the Habsburg Royal Hungary, Ottoman Hungary and the semi-independent Principality of Transylvania.
The Kingdom of Hungary between 1526 and 1867, while outside the Holy Roman Empire, was part of the lands of the Habsburg Monarchy that became the Empire of Austria in 1804.

Ottoman Hungary

Turkish occupationHungaryOttoman occupation
Due to the Ottoman occupation of the central and southern territories of Hungary in the 16th century, the country was partitioned into three parts: the Habsburg Royal Hungary, Ottoman Hungary and the semi-independent Principality of Transylvania.
Ottoman Hungary was the territory of southern and central Medieval Hungary which was ruled by the Ottoman Empire from 1541 to 1699.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-HungarianAustro-Hungarian EmpireAustrian
From 1867, territories connected to the Hungarian crown were incorporated into Austria-Hungary under the name of Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen.
Austria-Hungary, often referred to as the Austro-Hungarian Empire or the Dual Monarchy in English-language sources, was a constitutional union of the Austrian Empire (the Kingdoms and Lands Represented in the Imperial Council, or Cisleithania) and the Kingdom of Hungary (Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen or Transleithania) that existed from 1867 to 1918, when it self-dissolved at the end of World War I.

Battle of Mohács

MohácsMohács disaster1526 Battle of Mohács
The House of Habsburg held the Hungarian throne after the Battle of Mohács until 1918 and also played a key role in the liberation wars against the Ottoman Empire.
It was fought on 29 August 1526 near Mohács, Kingdom of Hungary, between the forces of the Kingdom of Hungary, led by Louis II, and those of the Ottoman Empire, led by Suleiman the Magnificent.

Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen

Kingdom of HungaryHungaryLands of the Crown of Saint Stephen (Hungary)
From 1867, territories connected to the Hungarian crown were incorporated into Austria-Hungary under the name of Lands of the Crown of Saint Stephen.
Pursuant to Article 1 of the Croatian–Hungarian Settlement of 1868, this territory was officially defined as "a state union of Kingdom of Hungary and Triune Kingdom of Croatia, Slavonia and Dalmatia".

Treaty of Trianon

TrianonTrianon Peace Treatycensus data
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
The Treaty of Trianon was the peace agreement of 1920 that formally ended World War I between most of the Allies of World War I and the Kingdom of Hungary, the latter being one of the successor states to Austria-Hungary.

Hungary

🇭🇺HungarianHUN
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
His great-grandson Stephen I ascended the throne in 1000, converting his realm to a Christian kingdom.

Carpathian Ruthenia

TranscarpathiaZakarpattiaCarpathia
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
Before World War I most of this region was part of the Kingdom of Hungary.

Slovakia

🇸🇰SlovakSVK
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
In the 10th century, after the dissolution of Great Moravia, the territory was integrated into the Principality of Hungary, which would become the Kingdom of Hungary in 1000.

Principality of Hungary

HungarianHungariansHungary
The Principality of Hungary emerged as a Christian kingdom upon the coronation of the first king Stephen I at Esztergom in about the year 1000; his family (the Árpád dynasty) led the monarchy for 300 years.
The principality was succeeded by the Christian Kingdom of Hungary with the coronation of St Stephen I at Esztergom on Christmas Day 1000 (its alternative date is 1 January 1001).

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Due to the Ottoman occupation of the central and southern territories of Hungary in the 16th century, the country was partitioned into three parts: the Habsburg Royal Hungary, Ottoman Hungary and the semi-independent Principality of Transylvania.
Suleiman the Magnificent (1520–1566) captured Belgrade in 1521, conquered the southern and central parts of the Kingdom of Hungary as part of the Ottoman–Hungarian Wars, and, after his historic victory in the Battle of Mohács in 1526, he established Turkish rule in the territory of present-day Hungary (except the western part) and other Central European territories.

Croatia

🇭🇷CroatianRepublic of Croatia
From 1102 it also included Croatia, being in personal union with it, united under the King of Hungary.
Croatia entered a personal union with Hungary in 1102.

King of Hungary

Kingkings of HungaryHungary
From 1102 it also included Croatia, being in personal union with it, united under the King of Hungary.
The King of Hungary (magyar király) was the ruling head of state of the Kingdom of Hungary from 1000 (or 1001) to 1918.

Poland

🇵🇱PolishPOL
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
The Jagiellon dynasty at one point also established dynastic control over the kingdoms of Bohemia (1471 onwards) and Hungary.

Rijeka

FiumeOrehovicaŠkurinje
The names in the other native languages of the kingdom were: Królestwo Węgier, Regatul Ungariei, Kraljevina Ugarska, Kraljevina Ugarska, Kraljevina Ogrska, Uhorské kráľovstvo, and Italian (for the city of Fiume), Regno d'Ungheria.
Historically, because of its strategic position and its excellent deep-water port, the city was fiercely contested, especially among Italy, Hungary (serving as the Kingdom of Hungary's largest and most important port), and Croatia, changing hands and demographics many times over centuries.

Székesfehérvár

FehérvárStuhlweissenburgİstolni Belgrad
Since the ceremony was not performed with the Hungarian Holy Crown, and in the city of Székesfehérvár, it was considered illegitimate.
Székesfehérvár, a royal residence (székhely), as capital of the Kingdom of Hungary, held a central role in the Middle Ages.

Serbia

🇷🇸SRBSerbian
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
The northern part, Vojvodina, was ruled by the Kingdom of Hungary.

Transylvania

TransylvanianTransilvaniaSiebenbürgen
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
The Kingdom of Hungary established partial control over Transylvania in 1003, when king Stephen I, according to legend, defeated the prince named Gyula.

Romania

🇷🇴ROURomanian
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
Under Radu I and his successor Dan I, the realms in Transylvania and Severin continued to be disputed with Hungary, while Wallachia and Moldavia remained largely independent from the Kingdom of Hungary, yet soon enough being forced to withstand the Ottoman threat from the east.

Eastern Hungarian Kingdom

John Szapolyai's Hungarian kingdomTransylvaniaeastern territories of the medieval Kingdom of Hungary
Eastern Hungarian Kingdom under the Szapolyai. Note that this territory, often under Ottoman influence, was different from Transylvania proper and included various other territories sometimes referred to as Partium. Later the entity was called Principality of Transylvania.
The Eastern Hungarian Kingdom (in Hungarian: Keleti Magyar Királyság) is a modern term used by historians to designate the realm of John Zápolya and his son John Sigismund Zápolya, who contested the claims of the House of Habsburg to rule the Kingdom of Hungary from 1526 to 1570.

Austria

🇦🇹AUTAustrian
The Kingdom of Hungary was a multiethnic state from its inception until the Treaty of Trianon and it covered what is today Hungary, Poland, Slovakia, Transylvania and other parts of what is now Romania, Carpathian Ruthenia (now part of Ukraine), Vojvodina (now part of Serbia), Burgenland (now part of Austria), and other smaller territories surrounding present-day Hungary's borders.
The Austro-Hungarian Compromise of 1867, the Ausgleich, provided for a dual sovereignty, the Austrian Empire and the Kingdom of Hungary, under Franz Joseph I.

Ladislaus I of Hungary

Ladislaus ILadislausSaint Ladislaus
The second greatest Hungarian king, also from the Árpád dynasty, was Ladislaus I of Hungary, who stabilized and strengthened the kingdom.
He occupied almost all Croatia in 1091, which marked the beginning of an expansion period for the medieval Kingdom of Hungary.

Budapest

Budapest, HungaryPestBuda
Several holidays, the official language (Hungarian), and the capital city Budapest have also been retained.
The Magyar tribes led by Árpád, forced out of their original homeland north of Bulgaria by Tsar Simeon after the Battle of Southern Buh, settled in the territory at the end of the 9th century displacing the founding Bulgarian settlers of the towns of Buda and Pest, and a century later officially founded the Kingdom of Hungary.