Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelnorthern Kingdom of Israelking of Israelnorthern kingdomIsrael (Samaria)northSamariaIsraeliteKingdom of (northern) Israel
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Kingdom of Israel was one of two successor states to the former United Kingdom of Israel and Judah.wikipedia
436 Related Articles

Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelUnited Kingdom of Israel
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Kingdom of Israel was one of two successor states to the former United Kingdom of Israel and Judah.
On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the biblical account reports that the country split into two kingdoms: the Kingdom of Israel (including the cities of Shechem and Samaria) in the north and the Kingdom of Judah (containing Jerusalem) in the south.

Omrides

OmrideHouse of OmriOmride dynasty
Modern scholarship, incorporating textual criticism and archaeology, has challenged the biblical account that the northern kingdom of Israel broke off from a united monarchy with the southern kingdom of Judah, suggesting instead that the northern civilization of Israel developed independently of Judah (a comparatively small and rural area), and that it first reached the political, economic, military and architectural sophistication of a kingdom under the Omride dynasty around 884 BCE.
The Omrides, Omrids or House of Omri were a ruling dynasty of the Kingdom of Israel (Samaria) founded by King Omri.

Samaria (ancient city)

SamariaSamaria-SebasteSebaste
The major cities of the kingdom were Shechem, Tirzah, and Shomron (Samaria). King Omri built his capital in Samaria (1 Kings 16:24), which continued as such until the destruction of the Kingdom by the Assyrians . During the three-year siege of Samaria by the Assyrians, Shalmaneser V died and was succeeded by Sargon II of Assyria, who himself records the capture of that city thus: "Samaria I looked at, I captured; 27,280 men who dwelt in it I carried away" into Assyria. Its capital was Samaria according to the Book of Isaiah.
It was the capital of the northern Kingdom of Israel in the 9th and 8th centuries BC. The ruins of the city are located in the Samaria mountains of the West Bank and are under the jurisdiction of the Israel National Parks Authority.

Neo-Assyrian Empire

Neo-AssyrianAssyrianAssyrians
The Kingdom of Israel existed roughly from 930 BCE until 720 BCE, when it was conquered by the Neo-Assyrian Empire.
Following the conquests of Adad-nirari II in the late 10th century BC, Assyria emerged as the most powerful state in the known world at the time, coming to dominate the Ancient Near East, East Mediterranean, Asia Minor, Caucasus, and parts of the Arabian Peninsula and North Africa, eclipsing and conquering rivals such as Babylonia, Elam, Persia, Urartu, Lydia, the Medes, Phrygians, Cimmerians, Israel, Judah, Phoenicia, Chaldea, Canaan, the Kushite Empire, the Arabs, and Egypt.

Shechem

ŠakmuSichemJacob's Well
The major cities of the kingdom were Shechem, Tirzah, and Shomron (Samaria).
Shechem, also spelled Sichem ( / Standard Šəḵem Tiberian Šeḵem, "shoulder"), was a Canaanite city mentioned in the Amarna letters, and is mentioned in the Hebrew Bible as an Israelite city of the tribe of Manasseh and the first capital of the Kingdom of Israel.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
Historians often refer to the Kingdom of Israel as the "Northern Kingdom" or as the "Kingdom of Samaria" to differentiate it from the Southern Kingdom of Judah.
The two kingdoms, Judah in the south and Israel in the north, coexisted uneasily after the split until the destruction of the Kingdom of Israel by Assyria in c. 722/721.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magic
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.
He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death.

Jeroboam

Jeroboam IKing Jeroboam of IsraelBiblical, first king of Northern Kingdom
Jeroboam, who was not of the Davidic line, was sent forth from Egypt by the malcontents.
Jeroboam I (Hebrew: Yārāḇə‘ām; Ἱεροβοάμ) was the first king of the northern Kingdom of Israel after the revolt of the ten northern Israelite tribes against Rehoboam that put an end to the United Monarchy.

Tribe of Reuben

ReubenReubenitesReubenite
According to the Hebrew Bible, the territory of the Kingdom of Israel comprised the territories of the tribes of Zebulun, Issachar, Asher, Naphtali, Dan, Manasseh, Ephraim, Reuben and Gad.
Reuben, along with nine other tribes, is reckoned by the Bible as part of the northern kingdom of Israel, and disappears from history with the demise of that kingdom in c. 723 BC.

Tribe of Manasseh

ManassehMenassehMenashe
According to the Hebrew Bible, the territory of the Kingdom of Israel comprised the territories of the tribes of Zebulun, Issachar, Asher, Naphtali, Dan, Manasseh, Ephraim, Reuben and Gad. 2 Chronicles 15:9 also says that members of the tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh and Simeon fled to Judah during the reign of Asa of Judah.
However, on the accession of Rehoboam, David's grandson, in c. 930 BC the northern tribes split from the House of David to reform a Kingdom of Israel as the Northern Kingdom.

Ephraim and Judah

Ephraimthe tribe that embodies
It is also frequently referenced (particularly in poetry) as Ephraim, the tribe whose territory housed the capital cities and the royal families.
Since "Ephraim" was a specific tribe of Israel, careful contextual analysis should be used when distinguishing the differences in tribal and figurative kingdom identifications within the Tanakh, especially since the Prophets used the terms "Ephraim", "Joseph", and "Israel" interchangeably, speaking of the same entity, the Northern Kingdom of Israel, the House of Israel, or the House of Joseph.

Tribe of Ephraim

EphraimEphraimitesEphrem
According to the Hebrew Bible, the territory of the Kingdom of Israel comprised the territories of the tribes of Zebulun, Issachar, Asher, Naphtali, Dan, Manasseh, Ephraim, Reuben and Gad. 2 Chronicles 15:9 also says that members of the tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh and Simeon fled to Judah during the reign of Asa of Judah.
However, on the accession of Rehoboam, David's grandson, in c. 930 BCE the northern tribes split from the House of David to form the northern Kingdom of Israel.

Rehoboam

King Rehoboam of JudahSolomon's heir Rehoboam, King of the Hebrews
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.
In the account of I Kings and II Chronicles, he was initially king of the United Monarchy of Israel, but after the ten northern tribes of Israel rebelled in 932/931 BC to form the independent Kingdom of Israel (Samaria), under the rule of Jeroboam, Rehoboam remained as king only of the Kingdom of Judah, or southern kingdom.

Omri

King Omri
King Omri built his capital in Samaria (1 Kings 16:24), which continued as such until the destruction of the Kingdom by the Assyrians . During the three-year siege of Samaria by the Assyrians, Shalmaneser V died and was succeeded by Sargon II of Assyria, who himself records the capture of that city thus: "Samaria I looked at, I captured; 27,280 men who dwelt in it I carried away" into Assyria. Today, among archaeologists, Samaria is one of the most universally accepted archaeological sites from the biblical period At around 850 BCE, the Mesha Stele, written in Old Hebrew alphabet, records a victory of King Mesha of Moab against king Omri of Israel and his son Ahab.
Omri (, ‘Omri; fl. 9th century BC) was, according to the Hebrew Bible, the sixth king of Israel.

Tirzah (ancient city)

Tirzaha rebellious townBiblical city of Tirzah
The major cities of the kingdom were Shechem, Tirzah, and Shomron (Samaria).
During the time of King Jeroboam, Tirzah is mentioned as the place where Abijah, son of Jeroboam, died as a result of illness . Later Tirzah is described as a capital of the northern kingdom of Israel during the reigns of Baasha, Elah, Zimri and Omri.

Davidic line

House of DavidDavidic dynastyDavidic
Jeroboam, who was not of the Davidic line, was sent forth from Egypt by the malcontents.
After the death of David's son, King Solomon, the ten northern tribes of the Kingdom of Israel rejected the Davidic line, refusing to accept Solomon's son, Rehoboam, and instead chose as king Jeroboam and formed the northern Kingdom of Israel.

Ahab

King AhabAh-ab
Today, among archaeologists, Samaria is one of the most universally accepted archaeological sites from the biblical period At around 850 BCE, the Mesha Stele, written in Old Hebrew alphabet, records a victory of King Mesha of Moab against king Omri of Israel and his son Ahab. The conflict between Israel and Judah was resolved when Jehoshaphat, King of Judah, allied himself with the house of Ahab through marriage.
Ahab (Achab) was the seventh king of Israel since Jeroboam I, the son and successor of Omri, and the husband of Jezebel of Sidon, according to the Hebrew Scriptures.

Tribe of Judah

JudahTribes of Judahhouse of Judah
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.
On the accession of Rehoboam, Solomon's son, in c. 930 BCE, the ten northern tribes under the leadership of Jeroboam from the Tribe of Ephraim split from the House of David to create the Northern Kingdom in Samaria.

Pekah

Pekah of IsraelPekah the son of Remaliah
In c. 732 BCE, Pekah of Israel, while allied with Rezin, king of Aram, threatened Jerusalem.
Pekah (פֶּ֨קַח Peqaḥ; ) was king of Israel.

Jehu

However, the sons of Ahab were slaughtered by Jehu following his coup d'état around 840 BCE.
Jehu ( Yehu, meaning "Yahu is He"; ; Iehu) was the tenth king of the northern Kingdom of Israel since Jeroboam I, noted for exterminating the house of Ahab at the instruction of Jehovah.

Jehoshaphat

JosaphatIosaphat/JosaphatJesophat
The conflict between Israel and Judah was resolved when Jehoshaphat, King of Judah, allied himself with the house of Ahab through marriage.
He spent the first years of his reign fortifying his kingdom against the Kingdom of Israel.

Book of Isaiah

IsaiahIs.Deutero-Isaiah
Its capital was Samaria according to the Book of Isaiah.
During this period, Assyria was expanding westward from its origins in modern-day northern Iraq towards the Mediterranean, destroying first Aram (modern Syria) in 734–732 BCE, then the Kingdom of Israel in 722–721, and finally subjugating Judah in 701.

Athaliah

Athaliah, King of Jerusalem(Queen) AthaliahAthalie
Later, Jehosophat's son and successor, Jehoram of Judah, married Ahab's daughter Athaliah, cementing the alliance.
Athaliah is usually considered the daughter of King Ahab and Queen Jezebel of Israel.

Asa of Judah

AsaAsa, king of JudahKing Asa
2 Chronicles 15:9 also says that members of the tribes of Ephraim, Manasseh and Simeon fled to Judah during the reign of Asa of Judah.
After concluding a battle with Zerah of Ethiopia in the 10th year of his reign, there was peace in Judah until the 25th year of Asa's reign . In his 26th year he was confronted by Baasha, king of Israel.

Tribe of Benjamin

BenjaminBenjamiteBenjamites
After the death of Solomon in about 931 BCE, all the Israelite tribes except for Judah and Benjamin (called the ten northern tribes) refused to accept Rehoboam, the son and successor of Solomon, as their king.
On the accession of Rehoboam, David's grandson, in c. 930 BCE the northern tribes split from the House of David to constitute the northern Kingdom of Israel.