Kingdom of Israel (united monarchy)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelUnited Kingdom of IsraelKing of IsraelUnited MonarchyUnited Kingdom of Israel and Judahkings of IsraelUnited Monarchy of IsraelKingAncient Israel
The United Monarchy is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible.wikipedia
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Saul

King Saulbattle of GilboaKing Saul of Israel
The United Monarchy is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible.
Saul (, meaning "asked for, prayed for"), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the first king of the Kingdom of Israel and Judah.

Solomon

King SolomonSalomonSolomonic magic
The United Monarchy is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible.
He is described as the third king of the United Monarchy, which would break apart into the northern Kingdom of Israel and the southern Kingdom of Judah shortly after his death.

David

King DavidDavid and GoliathDavidic
The United Monarchy is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible.
David is described in the Hebrew Bible as the second king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah after Saul and Ish-bosheth.

Rehoboam

King Rehoboam of JudahSolomon's heir Rehoboam, King of the Hebrews
On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the biblical account reports that the country split into two kingdoms: the Kingdom of Israel (including the cities of Shechem and Samaria) in the north and the Kingdom of Judah (containing Jerusalem) in the south.
Rehoboam (/ˌriːəˈboʊ.əm/ Hebrew: רְחַבְעָם‬, Rehav'am; Greek: Ροβοαμ, Rovoam; Latin: Roboam) was the fourth king of Israel according to the Hebrew Bible.

Kingdom of Israel (Samaria)

Kingdom of IsraelIsraelnorthern Kingdom of Israel
On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the biblical account reports that the country split into two kingdoms: the Kingdom of Israel (including the cities of Shechem and Samaria) in the north and the Kingdom of Judah (containing Jerusalem) in the south.
According to the Hebrew Bible, the Kingdom of Israel was one of two successor states to the former United Kingdom of Israel and Judah.

Kingdom of Judah

Judahking of JudahJudahite
On the succession of Solomon's son, Rehoboam, around 930 BCE, the biblical account reports that the country split into two kingdoms: the Kingdom of Israel (including the cities of Shechem and Samaria) in the north and the Kingdom of Judah (containing Jerusalem) in the south.
The Hebrew Bible depicts it as the successor to a United Monarchy, but historians are divided about the veracity of this account.

Samuel

Prophet Samuel11 SamuelHannah and the Birth of Samuel
The anti-monarchical source describes Samuel as having thoroughly routed the Philistines, yet begrudgingly accepting the people's demand for a ruler, subsequently appointing Saul by cleromancy.
Samuel is a figure who, in the narratives of the Hebrew Bible, plays a key role in the transition from the period of the biblical judges to the institution of a kingdom under Saul, and again in the transition from Saul to David.

Philistines

PhilistinePhilistiaPeleset
The anti-monarchical source describes Samuel as having thoroughly routed the Philistines, yet begrudgingly accepting the people's demand for a ruler, subsequently appointing Saul by cleromancy. Increasing pressure from the Philistines and other neighboring peoples is said by the Bible to have forced the Israelites to unite as state following the anointing of Saul by Samuel.
This description portrays them at one period of time as among the Kingdom of Israel's most dangerous enemies.

Michal

David and Saul become bitter enemies, at least from Saul's point of view, although sources describe Jonathan, Saul's son, and Michal, Saul's daughter, as assisting David to escape Saul, ultimately leading to a brief reconciliation before Saul's death.
Michal was, according to the first Book of Samuel, a princess of the United Kingdom of Israel; the younger daughter of King Saul, she was the first wife of David, who later became king, first of Judah, then of Israel.

Absalom

Absalom (Abishalom)Absalom's ConspiracyAbsalom's revolt
Israel rebels against David and appoints David's son Absalom king, forcing David into exile east of the Jordan.
Absalom (, Avshalom, "father of peace"), according to the Hebrew Bible, was the third son of David, King of Israel with Maacah, daughter of Talmai, King of Geshur.

Jonathan (1 Samuel)

JonathanJonathasYehonatan
David and Saul become bitter enemies, at least from Saul's point of view, although sources describe Jonathan, Saul's son, and Michal, Saul's daughter, as assisting David to escape Saul, ultimately leading to a brief reconciliation before Saul's death.
A prince of the United Kingdom of Israel, he was the eldest son of King Saul as well as a close friend of David, who eventually succeeded Saul as king.

Twelve Tribes of Israel

tribes of Israel12 tribes of Israeltwelve tribes
According to the Book of Judges, before the rise of the united monarchy the Israelite tribes lived as a confederation under ad hoc charismatic leaders called judges.
In the biblical narrative, the period from the conquest of Canaan under the leadership of Joshua until the formation of the first Kingdom of Israel, passed with the tribes forming a loose confederation, described in the Book of Judges.

Biblical judges

Judgesjudgebiblical judge
According to the Book of Judges, before the rise of the united monarchy the Israelite tribes lived as a confederation under ad hoc charismatic leaders called judges.
The biblical scholar Kenneth Kitchen argues that, from the conquest of Canaan by Joshua until the formation of the first Kingdom of Israel and Judah (c.

Jerusalem

QudsJerusalem, Israelal-Quds
Following the civil war with Saul, David forges a strong and unified Israelite monarchy, reigning c. 1000 to 961 BCE and establishing Jerusalem as his national capital in 1006 BCE.
According to the Bible, King David conquered the city from the Jebusites and established it as the capital of the united kingdom of Israel, and his son, King Solomon, commissioned the building of the First Temple.

Anointing

anointedunctionanoint
Increasing pressure from the Philistines and other neighboring peoples is said by the Bible to have forced the Israelites to unite as state following the anointing of Saul by Samuel.
Prophets and the Israelite kings were also anointed as well, the kings from a horn.

Hebron

el-KhulilHebron/Al-Khalil Old TownHalil
After Saul's death, Ishbaal rules over the kingdom of Israel from Mahanaim, while David establishes the capital of the kingdom of Judah in Hebron.
Later, the biblical narrative has King David called by God to relocate to Hebron and reign from there for some seven years . It is there that the elders of Israel come to him to make a covenant before Elohim and anoint him king of Israel.

Israelites

IsraeliteIsraelchildren of Israel
The United Monarchy is the name given to the Israelite kingdom of Israel and Judah, during the reigns of Saul, David and Solomon, as depicted in the Hebrew Bible. According to the Book of Judges, before the rise of the united monarchy the Israelite tribes lived as a confederation under ad hoc charismatic leaders called judges.
In 120 BCE the Hasmonean king Yohanan Hyrcanos I destroyed the Samaritan temple on Mount Gerizim, due to the resentment between the two groups over a disagreement of whether Mount Moriah in Jerusalem or Mount Gerizim in Shechem was the actual site of the Aqedah, and the chosen place for the Holy Temple, a source of contention that had been growing since the two houses of the former united monarchy first split asunder in 930 BCE and which had finally exploded into warfare.

Solomon's Temple

TempleFirst TempleFirst
Solomon embarks on an aggressive campaign of public building, erecting the First Temple in Jerusalem with assistance from the King of Tyre, with whom he has maintained the strong alliance forged by his father.
The Hebrew Bible states that the temple was constructed under Solomon, king of the United Kingdom of Israel and Judah and that during the Kingdom of Judah, the temple was dedicated to Yahweh, and is said to have housed the Ark of the Covenant.

Zobah

Aram-ZobahAram ZobaAram-Sôvah
Israel grows from kingdom to empire, its sphere of influence—militarily and politically—expanding to control the weaker client states of Philistia, Moab, Edom and Ammon, with Aramaean city-states Aram-Zobah and Aram-Damascus becoming vassal states.
King Hadadezer bar Rehob allied with Ammon against David, who defeated Zobah and made the kingdom tributary to Israel (II Samuel 10).

Court History of David

This section of the biblical text, and the bulk of the remainder of the Books of Samuel, is thought by textual critics to belong to a single large source known as the Court History of David.
German theologian Leonhard Rost (see German Wikipedia article on Rost) described the history of David's family in and as a Succession Document aiming to justify Solomon's succession to the throne of the United Monarchy after the death of David.

Ish-bosheth

IshbaalEsh-baalEshbaʿal
His heir, Ishbaal, rules for only two years before being assassinated.
According to the Hebrew Bible, Ish-bosheth (, Ishboshet), also called Eshbaal (, Eshbaal; also Ashbaal or Ishbaal), was one of the four sons of King Saul and was chosen as the second king over the Kingdom of Israel, which then consisted of all the Twelve Tribes of Israel, after the death of his father and three brothers at the Battle of Mount Gilboa.

Hiram I

HiramHiram, King of TyreHiram of Tyre
Solomon embarks on an aggressive campaign of public building, erecting the First Temple in Jerusalem with assistance from the King of Tyre, with whom he has maintained the strong alliance forged by his father.
The Hebrew Bible says that he allied himself with David, king of the United Kingdom of Israel and his artisans built David's palace in Jerusalem after his capture of the city.

Books of Samuel

1 Samuel2 SamuelSamuel
According to the Second Book of Samuel, Saul's disobedience prompts God to curtail his reign and hand his kingdom over to another dynasty.
contains David's final words to Solomon, his son and successor as king.

Mahanaim

After Saul's death, Ishbaal rules over the kingdom of Israel from Mahanaim, while David establishes the capital of the kingdom of Judah in Hebron.
In the Biblical narrative, around the start of the United Monarchy, the city was a stronghold that had been adapted to serve as a sanctuary for important fugitives (2 Samuel 18:2); the narrative states that after King Saul died, Abner, the commander of Saul’s army, established Saul’s son, Ish-bosheth, in Mahanaim as king of Israel (2 Samuel 2:8).

Goliath

David and GoliathDavid versus GoliathDavid-and-Goliath
In August 2015, Israeli archaeologists discovered massive fortifications in the ruins of the ancient city of Gath, supposed birthplace of Goliath.
The story signified Saul's unfitness to rule, as Saul himself should have fought for the Kingdom of Israel.