Kingdom of Kush

KushKushiteKushitesCushCushitesKushitic KingdomNubiansCushiteEthiopianKing of Kush
The Kingdom of Kush was an ancient kingdom in Nubia, located at the Sudanese and southern Egyptian Nile Valley.wikipedia
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Sudan

SudaneseRepublic of SudanRepublic of the Sudan
The Kingdom of Kush was an ancient kingdom in Nubia, located at the Sudanese and southern Egyptian Nile Valley.
undefined 1500 BC–1070 BC) and the rise of the kingdom of Kush (c.

Nubia

NubianChristian Nubiaancient Nubians
The Kingdom of Kush was an ancient kingdom in Nubia, located at the Sudanese and southern Egyptian Nile Valley. Alara founded the Napatan, or 25th, Kushite dynasty at Napata in Nubia, now Sudan.
Nubia was home to several empires, most prominently the kingdom of Kush, which conquered Egypt during the 8th century BC during the reign of Piye and ruled the country as its Twenty-fifth Dynasty (to be replaced a century later by the native Egyptian Twenty-sixth Dynasty).

Kashta

After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
Kashta was an 8th century BC king of the Kushite Dynasty in ancient Nubia and the successor of Alara.

List of monarchs of Kush

Kushite Kingcomplete listKing of Kush
After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
This is an incomplete list for rulers with the title of Qore (king) or Kandake (queen) of the Kingdom of Kush.

Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt

25th DynastyTwenty-fifth Dynasty25th Dynasty of Egypt
After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
The 25th dynasty was a line of pharaohs who originated in the Kingdom of Kush, located in present-day northern Sudan and Upper Egypt.

New Kingdom of Egypt

New KingdomEgyptian EmpireRamesside
The Kushite era of rule in Nubia was established after the Late Bronze Age collapse and the disintegration of the New Kingdom of Egypt.
Similarly, in response to very successful 17th-century attacks during the Second Intermediate Period by the powerful Kingdom of Kush, the rulers of the New Kingdom felt compelled to expand far south into Nubia and to hold wide territories in the Near East.

Napata

Napatan kingdomNapatanNapatan kingdom of Nubia
Kush was centered at Napata (now modern Karima, Sudan) during its early phase. Alara founded the Napatan, or 25th, Kushite dynasty at Napata in Nubia, now Sudan.
It was the sometime capital of the Nubian Twenty-fifth Dynasty and, after its fall in 663 BC, of the Kingdom of Kush.

Egypt

EgyptianEGYArab Republic of Egypt
The Kingdom of Kush was an ancient kingdom in Nubia, located at the Sudanese and southern Egyptian Nile Valley.
The country was later invaded and conquered by Libyans, Nubians and Assyrians, but native Egyptians eventually drove them out and regained control of their country.

Kingdom of Aksum

AksumiteAksumKingdom of Axum
The seat was eventually captured and burnt to the ground by the Kingdom of Aksum.
The Aksumite rulers facilitated trade by minting their own Aksumite currency, with the state establishing its hegemony over the declining Kingdom of Kush.

Meroë

MeroeMeroiticMeroitic period
During classical antiquity, the Kushite imperial capital was located at Meroë.
This city was the capital of the Kingdom of Kush for several centuries.

Alodia

AlwaAlodia/AlwaAloudia
Afterwards the Nubians established the three, eventually Christianized, kingdoms of Nobatia, Makuria and Alodia.
Founded sometime after the ancient kingdom of Kush fell, in around 350 AD, Alodia is first mentioned in historical records in 569.

Nubians

NubianNubian people Nubian
Afterwards the Nubians established the three, eventually Christianized, kingdoms of Nobatia, Makuria and Alodia.
Other parts of Nubia, particularly Lower or Upper Nubia, were at times a part of ancient Pharaonic Egypt and at other times a rival state representing parts of Meroë or the Kingdom of Kush.

Nobatia

NobadiaNobataeKingdom of Nobatia
Afterwards the Nubians established the three, eventually Christianized, kingdoms of Nobatia, Makuria and Alodia.
Together with the two other Nubian kingdoms, Makuria and Alodia, it succeeded the kingdom of Kush.

Makuria

Kingdom of MakuriaEarly ChristianMakouria
Afterwards the Nubians established the three, eventually Christianized, kingdoms of Nobatia, Makuria and Alodia.
By the early 4th century, if not before, the Kingdom of Kush with its capital Meroe was collapsing.

Neo-Assyrian Empire

Neo-AssyrianAssyrianAssyrians
After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
Beginning with the campaigns of Adad-nirari II, Assyria again became a great power, overthrowing the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt and conquering Elam, Urartu, Media, Persia, Mannea, Gutium, Phoenicia/Canaan, Arabia, Israel, Judah, Philistia, Edom, Moab, Samarra, Cilicia, Cyprus, Chaldea, Nabatea, Commagene, Dilmun, Shutu and Neo-Hittites; driving the Nubians, Kushites and Ethiopians from Egypt; defeating the Cimmerians and Scythians; and exacting tribute from Phrygia among others.

Ashurbanipal

AssurbanipalAssur-bani-palAššur-bāni-apli
After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
Ashurbanipal inherited from Esarhaddon not only the throne of the empire but also the ongoing war in Egypt with Kush/Nubia.

Cush (Bible)

CushCushiteBiblical Cush
The name Kush, since at least the time of Josephus, has been connected with the biblical character Cush, in the Hebrew Bible (Hebrew: כוש), son of Ham (Genesis 10:6).
As such, "Cush" is alternately identified in scripture with the Kingdom of Kush or ancient Ethiopia.

Nubian pyramids

pyramidspyramidpyramids of Nubia
Kushites also built burial mounds and pyramids, and shared some of the same gods worshiped in Egypt, especially Ammon and Isis.
Nubian pyramids are pyramids that were built by the rulers of the ancient Kushite kingdoms.

Kerma culture

Kingdom of KermaKermaBronze age
The extent of cultural/political continuity between the Kerma culture and the chronologically succeeding Kingdom of Kush is difficult to determine.
By the eleventh century BCE, the more-Egyptianized Kingdom of Kush emerged, possibly from Kerma, and regained the region's independence from Egypt.

Psamtik I

Psammetichus IPsammetichusKing Psammetichus
After Kashta ("the Kushite") invaded Egypt in the 8th century BC, the monarchs of Kush were also the pharaohs of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty of Egypt, until they were defeated by the Neo-Assyrian Empire under the rule of Ashurbanipal a century later and finally expelled from Egypt by Psamtik I.
Necho I died in 664 BC when the Kushite king Tantamani tried unsuccessfully to seize control of lower Egypt from the Assyrian Empire.

Horn of Africa

HornSomali peninsulanortheastern Africa
Dental trait analysis of fossils dating from the Meroitic period in Semna, northern Nubia, found that they displayed traits similar to those of populations inhabiting the Nile, Horn of Africa, and Maghreb.
The state also established its hegemony over the declining Kingdom of Kush and regularly entered the politics of the kingdoms on the Arabian peninsula, eventually extending its rule over the region with the conquest of the Himyarite Kingdom.

Third Intermediate Period of Egypt

Third Intermediate PeriodLower EgyptThird Intermediate
Egypt's international prestige had declined considerably towards the end of the Third Intermediate Period.
Various points are offered as the beginning for the latter era, though it is most often regarded as dating from the foundation of the Twenty-Sixth Dynasty by Psamtik I in 664 BC, following the expulsion of the Nubian Kushite rulers of the Twenty-fifth Dynasty by the Assyrians under King Assurbanipal.

Mentuhotep II

Montuhotep IINebhepetre Mentuhotep IIMortuary Temple of Mentuhotep II
Mentuhotep II, the 21st century BC founder of the Middle Kingdom, is recorded to have undertaken campaigns against Kush in the 29th and 31st years of his reign.
This is the first attested appearance of the term Kush for Nubia in Egyptian records.

Alara of Nubia

Alara
Alara founded the Napatan, or 25th, Kushite dynasty at Napata in Nubia, now Sudan.
Alara was a King of Kush who is generally regarded as the founder of the Napatan royal dynasty by his 25th Dynasty Nubian successors and was the first recorded prince of Nubia.

Piye

PiankhyPaanchiPiankhi
Kashta's successor Piye seized control of Lower Egypt around 727 BC.
Piye (once transliterated as Piankhi; d. 714 BC) was an ancient Kushite king and founder of the Twenty-fifth dynasty of Egypt who ruled Egypt from 744–714 BC.