Kingdom of Mysore

MysoreMysore KingdomSultanate of MysoreMysore StateMysoreanPrincely State of MysoreKhudadadMaharaja of MysoreKing of MysoreSultan of Mysore
The Kingdom of Mysore was a kingdom in southern India, traditionally believed to have been founded in 1399 in the vicinity of the modern city of Mysore.wikipedia
1,019 Related Articles

Mysore

MysuruMysore cityMysore, India
The Kingdom of Mysore was a kingdom in southern India, traditionally believed to have been founded in 1399 in the vicinity of the modern city of Mysore.
It served as the capital city of the Kingdom of Mysore for nearly six centuries from 1399 until 1956.

Hyder Ali

Haidar AliHaider AliHyderali
The kingdom experienced sustained growth in per capita income and population, structural change in the economy, and increased pace of technological innovation, and reached the height of its economic and military power and dominion in the latter half of the 18th century under the de facto ruler Haider Ali and his son Tipu Sultan. The latter part of the rule of Krishnaraja II saw the Deccan Sultanates being eclipsed by the Mughals and in the confusion that ensued, Haider Ali, a captain in the army, rose to prominence.
1720 – 7 December 1782) was the Sultan and de facto ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore in southern India.

Tipu Sultan

Tippu SultanTipuTippoo Sahib
The kingdom experienced sustained growth in per capita income and population, structural change in the economy, and increased pace of technological innovation, and reached the height of its economic and military power and dominion in the latter half of the 18th century under the de facto ruler Haider Ali and his son Tipu Sultan.
Tipu Sultan (born Sultan Fateh Ali Sahab Tipu, 20 November 1750 – 4 May 1799), also known as Tipu Sahab or the Tiger of Mysore, was a ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore and a pioneer of rocket artillery.

Economy of the Kingdom of Mysore

economic development programeconomiceconomic development technique
The kingdom experienced sustained growth in per capita income and population, structural change in the economy, and increased pace of technological innovation, and reached the height of its economic and military power and dominion in the latter half of the 18th century under the de facto ruler Haider Ali and his son Tipu Sultan.
The Kingdom of Mysore (Kannada ಮೈಸೂರು ಸಾಮ್ರಾಜ್ಯ ) (1399 - 1947 CE) was a kingdom in southern India founded in 1399 by Yaduraya in the region of the modern city of Mysore, in the Karnataka state.

Kanthirava Narasaraja I

Kantheerava Narasaraja Wodeyar INarasaraja Wodeyar IKanthirava Narasaraja Wodeyar I
The 17th century saw a steady expansion of its territory and during the rule of Narasaraja Wodeyar I and Chikka Devaraja Wodeyar, the kingdom annexed large expanses of what is now southern Karnataka and parts of Tamil Nadu to become a powerful state in the southern Deccan.
Kanthirava Narasaraja Wodeyar I (Ranadhira Kanteerava Narasa Raja Wodeyar) (1615-31 July 1659) was the twelfth maharaja of the Kingdom of Mysore from 1638 to 1659.

Wadiyar dynasty

WodeyarWodeyar dynastyWadiyar
The kingdom, which was ruled by the Wodeyar family, initially served as a vassal state of the Vijayanagara Empire.
The Wadiyar (alternatively spelt Wodeyer or Odeyer) dynasty was a Hindu Yaduvanshi dynasty in Indian subcontinent that ruled the Kingdom of Mysore from 1399 to 1950, with a brief interruption in the late 1700s.

Anglo-Mysore Wars

Anglo-Mysore Warconstant warfare against the Sultans of MysoreAnglo–Mysore Wars
During this time, it came into conflict with the Marathas, the Nizam of Hyderabad, the Kingdom of Travancore and the British, which culminated in the four Anglo-Mysore Wars.
The Anglo–Mysore Wars were a series of wars fought in over the last three decades of the 18th century between the Kingdom of Mysore on the one hand, and the British East India Company (represented chiefly by the Madras Presidency), and Maratha Confederacy and the Nizam of Hyderabad on the other.

Chikka Devaraja

Chikka Devaraja WodeyarChikkadevaraja WodeyarChikka Devaraja Wadiyar
The 17th century saw a steady expansion of its territory and during the rule of Narasaraja Wodeyar I and Chikka Devaraja Wodeyar, the kingdom annexed large expanses of what is now southern Karnataka and parts of Tamil Nadu to become a powerful state in the southern Deccan.
Devaraja Wodeyar II (Chikka Devaraja Wodeyar; 22 Sept 1645 – 16 Nov 1704) was the fourteenth maharaja of the Kingdom of Mysore from 1673 to 1704.

South India

Southern IndiaSouth IndianPeninsular India
The Kingdom of Mysore was a kingdom in southern India, traditionally believed to have been founded in 1399 in the vicinity of the modern city of Mysore.
During the British colonial rule, the region was divided into the Madras Presidency, Hyderabad State, Mysore, Travancore, Kochi, Vizianagaram and a number of other minor princely states.

Princely state

princely statesIndian Princely Statesprincely
The British restored the Wodeyars to their throne by way of a subsidiary alliance and the diminished Mysore was transformed into a princely state.
In the south, however, the Hindu Vijayanagara Empire remained dominant until the mid-17th century; among its tributaries was the future Mysore Kingdom.

Kannada literature

KannadaNavodayaliterature
The first unambiguous mention of the Wodeyar family is in 16th century Kannada literature from the reign of the Vijayanagara king Achyuta Deva Raya (1529–1542); the earliest available inscription, issued by the Wodeyars themselves, dates to the rule of the petty chief Timmaraja II in 1551.
After the decline of the Vijayanagara empire in the 16th century, Kannada literature was supported by the various rulers, including the Wodeyars of the Kingdom of Mysore and the Nayakas of Keladi.

Coimbatore

Coimbatore cityKovaiCoimbatore, Tamil Nadu
Expansionist ambitions then turned southward into Tamil country where Narasaraja Wodeyar acquired Satyamangalam (in modern northern Coimbatore district) while his successor Dodda Devaraja Wodeyar expanded further to capture western Tamil regions of Erode and Dharmapuri, after successfully repulsing the chiefs of Madurai. The kingdom soon grew to include Salem and Bangalore to the east, Hassan to the west, Chikkamagaluru and Tumkur to the north and the rest of Coimbatore to the south.
In the later part of the 18th century, the Coimbatore region came under the Kingdom of Mysore and following the defeat of Tipu Sultan in the Anglo-Mysore Wars, the British East India Company annexed Coimbatore to the Madras Presidency in 1799.

Vijayanagara Empire

Vijayanagar EmpireVijayanagarVijayanagara
The kingdom, which was ruled by the Wodeyar family, initially served as a vassal state of the Vijayanagara Empire.
These include the Mysore Kingdom, Keladi Nayaka, Nayaks of Madurai, Nayaks of Tanjore, Nayakas of Chitradurga and Nayak Kingdom of Gingee – all of which declared independence and went on to have a significant impact on the history of South India in the coming centuries.

Bangalore

BengaluruBangalore, IndiaBangalore, Karnataka
The kingdom soon grew to include Salem and Bangalore to the east, Hassan to the west, Chikkamagaluru and Tumkur to the north and the rest of Coimbatore to the south.
After the fall of Vijayanagar empire in 16th century, the Mughals sold Bangalore to Chikkadevaraja Wodeyar (1673–1704), the then ruler of the Kingdom of Mysore for three lakh rupees.

Indian independence movement

Indian independenceIndian freedom movementindependence
The Wodeyars continued to rule the state until Indian independence in 1947, when Mysore acceded to the Union of India.
The Anglo–Mysore Wars were a series of wars fought in over the last three decades of the 18th century between the Kingdom of Mysore on the one hand, and the British East India Company (represented chiefly by the Madras Presidency), and Maratha Confederacy and the Nizam of Hyderabad on the other.

Hassan district

HassanHasanManjarbad
The kingdom soon grew to include Salem and Bangalore to the east, Hassan to the west, Chikkamagaluru and Tumkur to the north and the rest of Coimbatore to the south.
In the 17th and 18th centuries, Hassan became a land of contention between the Keladi Nayakas of Shimoga and the Mysore Kingdom.

Dharmapuri

TagadurThagadoor
Expansionist ambitions then turned southward into Tamil country where Narasaraja Wodeyar acquired Satyamangalam (in modern northern Coimbatore district) while his successor Dodda Devaraja Wodeyar expanded further to capture western Tamil regions of Erode and Dharmapuri, after successfully repulsing the chiefs of Madurai.
During 18th century present day Dharmapuri district was part of the Kingdom of Mysore and was called Baramahal.

History of Karnataka

Karnataka's historypost-medieval Karnataka
Haider Ali has earned an important place in the history of Karnataka for his fighting skills and administrative acumen.
According to the States Reorganization Act, 1956, the Kannada-speaking areas of Hyderabad State, Madras State were unified with Mysore State.

First Anglo-Mysore War

First Mysore WarBattle of ChengamFirst
In a bid to stem Haidar's rise, the British formed an alliance with the Marathas and the Nizam of Golconda, culminating in the First Anglo-Mysore War in 1767.
The First Anglo–Mysore War (1766–1769) was a conflict in India between the Sultanate of Mysore and the East India Company.

Second Anglo-Mysore War

Second Mysore WarSecondSecond Anglo–Mysore War
In July 1779 Haider Ali headed an army of 80,000, mostly cavalry, descending through the passes of the Ghats amid burning villages, before laying siege to British forts in northern Arcot starting the Second Anglo-Mysore War.
The Second Anglo–Mysore War was a conflict between the Kingdom of Mysore and the British East India Company from 1780 to 1784.

Zamorin of Calicut

ZamorinSamoothiriMalabar
By 1761, the Maratha menace had diminished and by 1763, Haider Ali had captured the Keladi kingdom, defeated the rulers of Bilgi, Bednur and Gutti, invaded the Malabar in the south and conquered the Zamorin's capital Calicut with ease in 1766 and extended the Mysore kingdom up to Dharwad and Bellary in the north.
In 1766 Haider Ali of Mysore defeated the Samoothiri of Kozhikode – an English East India Company dependant at the time – and absorbed Kozhikode to his state.

Battle of Saunshi

Haider Ali's army advanced towards the Marathas and fought them at the Battle of Saunshi and came out victorious during the same year.
The Battle of Saunshi was fought between the Sultanate of Mysore and the Maratha Empire.

Third Anglo-Mysore War

Third Mysore WarThird3rd Anglo-Mysore War
Tipu's successful attacks in 1790 on the Kingdom of Travancore, a British ally, was an effective victory for him, however it resulted in greater hostilities with the British which resulted in the Third Anglo-Mysore War.
The Third Anglo–Mysore War (1790–1792) was a conflict in South India between the Kingdom of Mysore and the East India Company and its allies, including the Maratha Empire and the Nizam of Hyderabad.

Krishnaraja Wadiyar II

Krishnaraja Wodeyar IIKrishanaraja Wodeyar IIKrishnaraja II
The latter part of the rule of Krishnaraja II saw the Deccan Sultanates being eclipsed by the Mughals and in the confusion that ensued, Haider Ali, a captain in the army, rose to prominence.
Krishnaraja Wadiyar II (Immadi Krishnaraja Wadiyar; ಇಮ್ಮಡಿ ಕೃಷ್ಣರಾಜ ಒಡೆಯರ್, 1728 – 25 April 1766 ), was the eighteenth maharaja of the Kingdom of Mysore from 1734 to 1766.

Siege of Seringapatam (1792)

Siege of Seringapatam1792began siege operations
By 1792, with aid from the Marathas who attacked from the north-west and the Nizam who moved in from the north-east, the British under Lord Cornwallis successfully besieged Srirangapatna, resulting in Tipu's defeat and the Treaty of Srirangapatna.
The 1792 Siege of Seringapatam was a battle and siege of the Mysorean capital city of Seringapatam (Srirangapatna) at the end of the Third Anglo-Mysore War.