Kingdom of Soissons

Domain of SoissonsSoissonsKingdom of SyagriusRoman rump staterump state
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.wikipedia
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Syagrius

The rulers of the rump state, notably its final ruler Syagrius, were referred to as "Kings of the Romans" (Latin: rex Romanorum) by the Germanic peoples surrounding Soissons, with the polity itself being identified as the Regnum Romanorum, "Kingdom of the Romans", by the Visigothic historian Gregory of Tours.
Syagrius (430 – 486 or 487) was the last Gallic military commander of a Roman rump state in northern Gaul, now called the Kingdom of Soissons.

Gaul

GallicGalliaGaulish
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.
Roman control of Gaul lasted for five centuries, until the last Roman rump state, the Domain of Soissons, fell to the Franks in AD 486.

Aegidius

The emergence of the Domain of Soissons began when Emperor Majorian (457–461) appointed Aegidius as magister militum of Roman Gaul.
Aegidius (died 464 or 465) was ruler of the short-lived Kingdom of Soissons from 461–464/465AD.

Battle of Soissons (486)

Battle of SoissonsdefeatedSoissons
In 486 Syagrius lost the Battle of Soissons to the Frankish king Clovis I and the domain was thereafter under the control of the Franks.
The Battle of Soissons was fought in 486 between Frankish forces under Clovis I and the Gallo-Roman domain of Soissons under Syagrius.

Rump state

rumpremnant staterump states
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.
One example of this is the Kingdom of Soissons in northern Gaul.

Clovis I

ClovisKing ClovisChlodovech
In 486 Syagrius lost the Battle of Soissons to the Frankish king Clovis I and the domain was thereafter under the control of the Franks.
In what is now northern France, then northern Gaul, he took control of a rump state of the Western Roman Empire controlled by Syagrius at the Battle of Soissons (486), and by the time of his death in either 511 or 513, he had also conquered smaller Frankish kingdoms towards the northeast, the Alemanni to the east, and Visigothic kingdom of Aquitania to the south.

Western Roman Empire

Western EmpireWesternWest
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.
Syagrius, who had managed to preserve Roman sovereignty in an exclave in northern Gaul (a realm today known as the Domain of Soissons) also recognized Nepos as his sovereign and the legitimate Western Emperor.

Franks

FrankishFrankFrankish kingdom
In 486 Syagrius lost the Battle of Soissons to the Frankish king Clovis I and the domain was thereafter under the control of the Franks.
After conquering the Kingdom of Soissons and expelling the Visigoths from southern Gaul at the Battle of Vouillé, he established Frankish hegemony over most of Gaul, excluding Burgundy, Provence and Brittany, which were eventually absorbed by his successors.

Roman Gaul

GaulGallo-RomanGallic
The emergence of the Domain of Soissons began when Emperor Majorian (457–461) appointed Aegidius as magister militum of Roman Gaul.
However, certain aspects of the ancient Celtic culture continued after the fall of Roman administration and the Domain of Soissons, a remnant of the Empire, survived from 457 to 486.

Francia

FrankishFrankish EmpireFrankish Kingdom
When he died, the Frankish realm was divided into four kingdoms, one for each of his sons.
In a thirty-year reign (481–511) Clovis defeated the Roman general Syagrius and conquered the Kingdom of Soissons, defeated the Alemanni (Battle of Tolbiac, 496) and established Frankish hegemony over them.

Alaric II

AlaricAlaric II, King of the Visigoths
Syagrius fled to the Visigothic king Alaric II, but the Franks threatened war if Syagrius were not surrendered to them.
The earliest documented event in Alaric's reign concerned providing refuge to Syagrius, the former ruler of the Domain of Soissons (in what is now northwestern France) who had been defeated by Clovis I, King of the Franks.

Vase of Soissons

*Vase of Soissons
The Vase of Soissons was a semi-legendary sacred vase, probably in precious metal or a hardstone carving rather than pottery (though the material is not specified), which was kept in a cathedral in the Kingdom of Soissons during Late Antiquity.

Soissons

Abbey of Saint-MédardDiocese of SoissonsSoissonnais
From 457 to 486, under Aegidius and his son Syagrius, Noviodunum was the capital of the Kingdom of Soissons, until it fell to the Frankish king Clovis I in 486 after the Battle of Soissons.

Historiography

historiographicalhistoriographerhistoriographic
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.

Late antiquity

late antiqueancientlate
In historiography, the Kingdom or Domain of Soissons refers to a rump state of the Western Roman Empire in northern Gaul, between the Somme and the Seine, that lasted for some twenty-five years during Late Antiquity.

Gregory of Tours

GregorySt. Gregory of ToursHistory of the Franks
The rulers of the rump state, notably its final ruler Syagrius, were referred to as "Kings of the Romans" (Latin: rex Romanorum) by the Germanic peoples surrounding Soissons, with the polity itself being identified as the Regnum Romanorum, "Kingdom of the Romans", by the Visigothic historian Gregory of Tours.

Majorian

Flavius Julius Valerius MajorianusJulius Majorianus AugustusMajorien
The emergence of the Domain of Soissons began when Emperor Majorian (457–461) appointed Aegidius as magister militum of Roman Gaul.

Magister militum

magistri militummagister peditummagister militum per Orientem
The emergence of the Domain of Soissons began when Emperor Majorian (457–461) appointed Aegidius as magister militum of Roman Gaul.

Ricimer

Flavius Ricimer
When Majorian was killed on the orders of Ricimer in 461, Aegidius maintained his own rule in the remnants of Roman Gaul that came to be known as the Domain or Kingdom of Soissons.

Romano-British culture

Romano-BritishRomano-BritonsRomano-Celtic
In the chaos of contemporary Gaul, he maintained his power against Franks to his east and Visigoths to his south; his relations to the Romano-British of Brittany may have been friendly.

History of Brittany

BrittanyBretonBreton history
In the chaos of contemporary Gaul, he maintained his power against Franks to his east and Visigoths to his south; his relations to the Romano-British of Brittany may have been friendly.

Territory

territoriesoverseas territoryterritorial
In 486 Syagrius lost the Battle of Soissons to the Frankish king Clovis I and the domain was thereafter under the control of the Franks.

Roman Italy

ItalyItaliaItalian
The remaining Roman territory in Gaul in the northwest was connected with the Roman possessions in the Auvergne, Provence and Languedoc which connected these to Italy.

Alans

AlanAlanicAlanian
Aegidius was allied with the Alans, and with Childeric I, king of the Salian Franks of Tournai, and helped them defeat the Visigoths at Orléans in 463.

Childeric I

ChildericChilderic I, King of the Salian FranksChilderick
Aegidius was allied with the Alans, and with Childeric I, king of the Salian Franks of Tournai, and helped them defeat the Visigoths at Orléans in 463.