Kingdom of Sussex

SussexSouth SaxonsKingdom of the South SaxonsKing of SussexKing of the South SaxonsSouth Saxona separate kingdomAnglo-SaxonAnglo-Saxon kingdomformer medieval kingdom
This refers to the "Kingdom of Sussex".wikipedia
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Sussex

County of SussexSussex, EnglandSouth Saxon
The Kingdom of Sussex had its initial focus in a territory based on the former kingdom and Romano-British civitas of the Regnenses and its boundaries coincided in general with those of the later county of Sussex.
Sussex, from the Old English Sūþsēaxe (South Saxons), is a historic county in South East England corresponding roughly in area to the ancient Kingdom of Sussex.

History of Anglo-Saxon England

Anglo-Saxon EnglandAnglo-SaxonSaxon
The Kingdom of the South Saxons, today referred to as the Kingdom of Sussex (Sūþseaxna rīce), was one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the Heptarchy of Anglo-Saxon England.
Anglo-Saxon history thus begins during the period of Sub-Roman Britain following the end of Roman control, and traces the establishment of Anglo-Saxon kingdoms in the 5th and 6th centuries (conventionally identified as seven main kingdoms: Northumbria, Mercia, East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Sussex, and Wessex), their Christianisation during the 7th century, the threat of Viking invasions and Danish settlers, the gradual unification of England under the Wessex hegemony during the 9th and 10th centuries, and ending with the Norman conquest of England by William the Conqueror in 1066.

Heptarchy

Anglo-Saxon kingdomsAnglo-Saxon kingsAnglo-Saxon kingdom
The Kingdom of the South Saxons, today referred to as the Kingdom of Sussex (Sūþseaxna rīce), was one of the seven traditional kingdoms of the Heptarchy of Anglo-Saxon England.
East Anglia, Essex, Kent, Mercia, Northumbria, Sussex, and Wessex.

Haestingas

HæstingasHaestaHastings area of Sussex
From the late 8th century, Sussex seems to have absorbed the Kingdom of the Haestingas, after the region was conquered by the Mercian king Offa. There is a theory that Watt may have been a sub-king who ruled over a tribe of people centred around modern day Hastings, known as the Haestingas and Nunna is described, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as the kinsman of Ine of Wessex who fought with him against Geraint, King of the Britons, in 710.
The foundation legend of the Kingdom of the South Saxons is given by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which states that in the year AD 477 Ælle arrived at a place called Cymenshore in three ships with his three sons.

Wessex

West SaxonsWest SaxonKingdom of Wessex
The South Saxons were ruled by the kings of Sussex until the country was annexed by Wessex, probably in 827, in the aftermath of the Battle of Ellandun. To the west, Bede describes the boundary with the Kingdom of Wessex as being opposite the Isle of Wight, and which later fell on the River Ems.
Cædwalla later conquered Sussex, Kent and the Isle of Wight.

Manhood Peninsula

ManhoodManhood EndManhood peninsula.
The Weald was not the only area of Sussex that was forested in Saxon times--for example, at the western end of Sussex is the Manhood Peninsula, which in the modern era is largely deforested, but the name is probably derived from the Old English maene-wudu meaning "men's wood" or "common wood" indicating that it was once woodland.
It was probably founded during the Anglo-Saxon period and had its own courts and local government until the system of hundreds was abolished by act of Parliament in the 19th century.

Chichester

Chichester, West SussexChichester, EnglandChichester, Sussex
The capital of the Kingdom of Sussex was at Chichester, and the seat of the kingdom's bishopric was at Selsey.
It was the chief city of the Kingdom of Sussex.

Ælle of Sussex

ÆlleAelleAelle of Sussex
The foundation legend of the Kingdom of the South Saxons is given by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which states that in the year AD 477 Ælle arrived at a place called Cymenshore in three ships with his three sons, Cissa, Cymen and Wlencing.
Ælle (also Aelle or Ella) is recorded in early sources as the first king of the South Saxons, reigning in what is now called Sussex, England, from 477 to perhaps as late as 514.

Battle of Mercredesburne

MercredesburneMearcredesburnaMecredesburne
The Chronicle goes on to describe Ælle's battle with the British in 485 near the bank of Mercredesburne, and his siege of the Saxon Shore fort at Andredadsceaster at modern Pevensey in 491 after which the inhabitants were massacred.
The Battle of Mercredesburne was one of three battles fought as part of the conquest of what became the Kingdom of Sussex in southern England.

Selsey

Church NortonSelsey, West SussexIsle of the Seals
The capital of the Kingdom of Sussex was at Chichester, and the seat of the kingdom's bishopric was at Selsey.
Selsey was the capital of the Kingdom of Sussex, possibly founded by Ælle.

Weald

High WealdThe WealdLow Weald
A large part of its territory was covered by the forest that took its name from the fort of Anderitum at modern Pevensey, and known to the Romano-British as the Forest of Andred and to the Saxons as Andredsleah or Andredsweald, known today as the Weald.
The Anglo-Saxon Chronicle relates events during the Anglo-Saxon conquest of Sussex when the native Britons (whom the Anglo-Saxons called Welsh) were driven from the coastal towns into the recesses of the forest for sanctuary,:

Rape (county subdivision)

Raperapesa county subdivision
By the Late Saxon period, the main administrative unit of Sussex was the district known as the rape.
It is possible that the rapes represent the shires of the ancient kingdom of Sussex, especially as in the 12th century they had sheriffs of their own.

Bede

Venerable BedeSaint BedeThe Venerable Bede
To the west, Bede describes the boundary with the Kingdom of Wessex as being opposite the Isle of Wight, and which later fell on the River Ems.
The fourth book begins with the consecration of Theodore as Archbishop of Canterbury, and recounts Wilfrid's efforts to bring Christianity to the kingdom of Sussex.

Cymenshore

Owers Bankthe OwersCymensora
The foundation legend of the Kingdom of the South Saxons is given by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which states that in the year AD 477 Ælle arrived at a place called Cymenshore in three ships with his three sons, Cissa, Cymen and Wlencing.
The legendary foundation of Saxon Sussex, by Ælle, is likely to have originated in an oral tradition before being recorded in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle.

Saxons

SaxonSassenachSaxon people
On the south coast of the island of Great Britain, it was originally a sixth-century Saxon colony and later an independent kingdom.

Selsey Abbey

SelseySee of Selseymonastery
Æðelwealh gave 87 hides (an area of land) and a royal vill to Wilfrid to enable him to found Selsey Abbey.
The Kingdom of Sussex was the last area of Anglo-Saxon England to be evangelised.

Cædwalla of Wessex

CædwallaCaedwallaCaedwalla of Wessex
Shortly after the arrival of St Wilfrid, the kingdom was ravaged with "fierce slaughter and devastation" and Æðelwealh was slain by an exiled West Saxon prince Cædwalla.
He was exiled from Wessex as a youth and during this period gathered forces and attacked the South Saxons, killing their king, Æthelwealh, in what is now Sussex.

Hwicce

kingdom of the HwicceWicciaHwicca
Æðelwealh also married Eabe, a princess of the Hwicce, a Mercian satellite province.
The Tribal Hidage assessed Hwicce at 7000 hides, which would give it a similar sized economy to the kingdoms of Essex and Sussex.

Wilfrid

St WilfridSaint WilfridSt. Wilfrid
In 681, the exiled St Wilfrid of Northumbria arrived in the kingdom of the South Saxons and remained there for five years evangelising and baptising the people.
Wilfrid spent the next few years in Selsey, now in West Sussex, where he founded an episcopal see and converted the pagan inhabitants of the Kingdom of Sussex to Christianity.

Bishop of Chichester

Bishop of SelseyChichesterBishops of Chichester
The abbey eventually became the seat of the South Saxon bishopric, where it remained until after the Norman Conquest, when it was moved to Chichester by decree of the Council of London of 1075.
The episcopal see at Selsey was founded by Saint Wilfrid, formerly Bishop of the Northumbrians, for the Anglo-Saxon Kingdom of Sussex in the late 7th century.

Ine of Wessex

IneKing IneKing Ine of Wessex
There is a theory that Watt may have been a sub-king who ruled over a tribe of people centred around modern day Hastings, known as the Haestingas and Nunna is described, in the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, as the kinsman of Ine of Wessex who fought with him against Geraint, King of the Britons, in 710.
By the end of Ine's reign, the kingdoms of Kent, Sussex, and Essex were no longer under West Saxon sway; however, Ine maintained control of what is now Hampshire, and consolidated and extended Wessex's territory in the western peninsula.

Nothhelm of Sussex

NoðhelmNothelmNothhelm
In 692 a grant is made by a king called Noðhelm (or Nunna) to his sister, which is witnessed by another king called Watt.
Noðhelm, or Nunna for short, was King of Sussex, apparently reigning jointly with Watt, Osric, and Æðelstan.

Æthelbert of Sussex

ÆðelberhtÆthelberht
A little later, Æðelberht was King of Sussex, but he is known only from charters.
Aethelbert (Æðelberht; fl. 8th century) was King of Sussex, but is known only from charters.

Cissa of Sussex

Cissa
The foundation legend of the Kingdom of the South Saxons is given by the Anglo-Saxon Chronicle, which states that in the year AD 477 Ælle arrived at a place called Cymenshore in three ships with his three sons, Cissa, Cymen and Wlencing.
(Wessex had absorbed the Kingdom of Sussex, founded by Ælle, during the reign of Egbert of Wessex (r.

Andhun of Sussex

Andhun
The latter was eventually expelled, by Æðelwealh's successors, two Ealdormen named Berhthun and Andhun.
Andhun was an Ealdorman of Sussex under King Æðelwealh, who was slain by the Wessex prince Cædwalla, who invaded and ravaged Sussex.