Kingship and kingdom of God

Kingdom of GodKingdom of HeavenGod's KingdomKingdomhis kingdomGod's kingdom on earthheaven on earthHeavenly KingdomKingship of Godthe Kingdom of God
The concept of the kingship of God appears in all Abrahamic religions, where in some cases the terms Kingdom of God and Kingdom of Heaven are also used.wikipedia
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Abrahamic religions

AbrahamicAbrahamic religionAbrahamic faiths
The concept of the kingship of God appears in all Abrahamic religions, where in some cases the terms Kingdom of God and Kingdom of Heaven are also used.
His followers viewed him as the Messiah, as in the Confession of Peter; after his crucifixion and death they came to view him as God incarnate, who was resurrected and will return at the end of time to judge the living and the dead and create an eternal Kingdom of God.

Kingdom of heaven (Gospel of Matthew)

Kingdom of Heaven the Kingdom of Heaven in the Gospel of MatthewHeaven
The "Kingdom of God" and its equivalent form "Kingdom of Heaven" in the Gospel of Matthew is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament.
It is generally seen as equivalent to the phrase "kingdom of God" (Greek: βασιλεία τοῦ θεοῦ) in the Gospel of Mark and the Gospel of Luke.

Jesus

Jesus ChristChristJesus of Nazareth
The "Kingdom of God" and its equivalent form "Kingdom of Heaven" in the Gospel of Matthew is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament.
In Mark, Jesus is the Son of God whose mighty works demonstrate the presence of God's Kingdom.

Gospel of Matthew

MatthewMatthew's GospelGospel according to Matthew
The "Kingdom of God" and its equivalent form "Kingdom of Heaven" in the Gospel of Matthew is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament.
Prior to the Crucifixion the Jews are called Israelites, the honorific title of God's chosen people; after it, they are called "Ioudaioi", Jews, a sign that through their rejection of the Christ the "Kingdom of Heaven" has been taken away from them and given instead to the church.

Throne of God

throneThrone of GloryGod's throne
, Isaiah 6, Ezekiel 1 and all speak of the Throne of God, although some philosophers such as Saadia Gaon and Maimonides interpreted such mention of a "throne" as allegory.
The Throne of God is the reigning centre of God in the Abrahamic religions: primarily Judaism, Christianity, and Islam.

Jewish Christian

Jewish Christiansorigins of ChristianityJewish Christianity
Matthew is likely to have instead used the term heaven because the background of his Jewish audience imposed restrictions on the frequent use of the name of God.
Jewish messianism has its root in the apocalyptic literature of the 2nd century BCE to the 1st century CE, promising a future "anointed" leader or Messiah to resurrect the Israelite "Kingdom of God", in place of the foreign rulers of the time.

New Testament

NewThe New TestamentNew Testaments
The "Kingdom of God" and its equivalent form "Kingdom of Heaven" in the Gospel of Matthew is one of the key elements of the teachings of Jesus in the New Testament.
They view it as the written revelation and good news of the Messiah, the ransom sacrifice of Jesus, and the Kingdom of God, explaining and expounding the Hebrew Bible, not replacing but vitally supplementing it.

Messiah

messianicmessianic figurePromised Messiah
Along these lines was the more "national" view in which the awaited messiah was seen as a liberator and the founder of a new state of Israel.
In Jewish eschatology, the term came to refer to a future Jewish king from the Davidic line, who will be "anointed" with holy anointing oil, to be king of God's kingdom, and rule the Jewish people during the Messianic Age.

Christ the King

Christus RexKingChrist King
The term pertains to the kingship of Christ over all creation.

Heaven

celestialParadiseheavenly kingdom
Matthew is likely to have instead used the term heaven because the background of his Jewish audience imposed restrictions on the frequent use of the name of God.
Sayings of Jesus recorded in the Gospels of Mark and Luke speak of the "Kingdom of God" (basileía tou theou), while the Gospel of Matthew more commonly uses the term "Kingdom of Heaven" (basileía tōn ouranōn).

Gospel of Luke

LukeLuke's GospelBook of Luke
The Gospel of Luke records Jesus' description of the Kingdom of God, "The kingdom of God does not come with observation; ... For indeed, the kingdom of God is within you."
His "salvation history" stretches from the Creation to the present time of his readers, in three ages: first, the time of "the Law and the Prophets", the period beginning with Genesis and ending with the appearance of John the Baptist (Luke 1:5–3:1); second, the epoch of Jesus, in which the Kingdom of God was preached (Luke 3:2–24:51); and finally the period of the Church, which began when the risen Christ was taken into Heaven, and would end with his second coming.

Apocalypticism

apocalypticapocalyptic prophetapocalypticist
While a number of theological interpretations of the term Kingdom of God have appeared in its eschatological context, e.g. apocalyptic, realized or Inaugurated eschatologies, no consensus has emerged among scholars.
In Christian and Islamic theology this concept is often referred to as The Second Coming of Jesus Christ and the establishment of The Kingdom of God on Earth.

World to come

age to comenew heaven and a new earthfuture external world
Some scholars see it as a Christian lifestyle, some as a method of world evangelization, some as the rediscovery of charismatic gifts, others relate it to no present or future situation, but the world to come.
The concept is related to but differs from the concepts of heaven, the afterlife, and the Kingdom of God in that heaven is another place or state generally seen as above the world, the afterlife is generally an individual's life after death, and the Kingdom of God could be in the present (such as realized eschatology) or the future.

Inaugurated eschatology

Inaugurated
While a number of theological interpretations of the term Kingdom of God have appeared in its eschatological context, e.g. apocalyptic, realized or Inaugurated eschatologies, no consensus has emerged among scholars.
Inaugurated eschatology is the belief in Christian theology that the end times were inaugurated in the life, death and resurrection of Jesus, and thus there are both "already" and "not yet" aspects to the Kingdom of God.

Heaven in Christianity

HeavenChristian heavenHeaven (Christianity)
Among these are Heaven as the Throne of God, The Throne of David, The Throne of Glory, The Throne of Grace and many more.
According to some views, some Christians in the 1st century believed that the Kingdom of God was coming to Earth within their own lifetimes and looked forward to a divine future on Earth.

Sermon on the Mount

The Sermon on the MountSermon of the Mountliteral interpretation of the Sermon on the Mount
The discourse goes on to condemn the superficiality of materialism and call the disciples not to worry about material needs, but to "seek" God's kingdom first.

God

Supreme BeingLordnature of God
The notion of God's kingship goes back to the Hebrew Bible, which refers to "his kingdom" but does not include the term "Kingdom of God".

Hebrew Bible

TanakhbiblicalHebrew Scriptures
The notion of God's kingship goes back to the Hebrew Bible, which refers to "his kingdom" but does not include the term "Kingdom of God".

Old Testament

Oldthe Old TestamentBiblical
Drawing on Old Testament teachings, the Christian characterization of the relationship between God and humanity inherently involves the notion of the "Kingship of God".

God in Christianity

GodChristian GodLord
Drawing on Old Testament teachings, the Christian characterization of the relationship between God and humanity inherently involves the notion of the "Kingship of God".

Quran

Qur'anKoranQur’an
The Quran does not include the term "kingdom of God", but refers to Abraham seeing the "Kingdom of the heavens".

Abraham

IbrahimAbramAvraham
The Quran does not include the term "kingdom of God", but refers to Abraham seeing the "Kingdom of the heavens".

Psalms

psalmBook of Psalmspsalmody
The "enthronement psalms" (Psalms 45, 93, 96, 97–99) provide a background for this view with the exclamation "The Lord is King".

Isaiah 6

Isaiah 6:2Isaiah 6:3Isaiah 6:1
, Isaiah 6, Ezekiel 1 and all speak of the Throne of God, although some philosophers such as Saadia Gaon and Maimonides interpreted such mention of a "throne" as allegory.

Ezekiel 1

Ezekiel 1:1Chapter 1Ezekiel 1:2
, Isaiah 6, Ezekiel 1 and all speak of the Throne of God, although some philosophers such as Saadia Gaon and Maimonides interpreted such mention of a "throne" as allegory.