Knee

knee injuryknee jointkneesknee-jointknee cartilageknee extensorsknee injuriesknee ligamentsknee surgeryinjury to his knee
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).wikipedia
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Human leg

leglegslower limb
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).
However, the definition in human anatomy refers only to the section of the lower limb extending from the knee to the ankle, also known as the crus.

Tibia

shinshin boneshinbone
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).
The tibia (plural tibiae or tibias), also known as the shinbone or shankbone, is the larger, stronger, and anterior (frontal) of the two bones in the leg below the knee in vertebrates (the other being the fibula, behind and to the outside of the tibia), and it connects the knee with the ankle bones.

Joint

jointsarticulationarticulated
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).
Some joints, such as the knee, elbow, and shoulder, are self-lubricating, almost frictionless, and are able to withstand compression and maintain heavy loads while still executing smooth and precise movements.

Thigh

thighsmedial thighmid-thighs
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).
In human anatomy, the thigh is the area between the hip (pelvis) and the knee.

Patella

kneecapknee capPatela
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint). At birth, the kneecap is just formed from cartilage, and this will ossify (change to bone) between the ages of three and five years.
The patella, also known as the kneecap, is a flat, circular-triangular bone which articulates with the femur (thigh bone) and covers and protects the anterior articular surface of the knee joint.

Femur

femorathigh bonefemoral
In humans and other primates, the knee joins the thigh with the leg and consists of two joints: one between the femur and tibia (tibiofemoral joint), and one between the femur and patella (patellofemoral joint).
The head of the femur articulates with the acetabulum in the pelvic bone forming the hip joint, while the distal part of the femur articulates with the tibia and kneecap forming the knee joint.

Articular capsule of the knee joint

capsular ligamentcapsule of the knee jointjoint capsule
The joint is bathed in synovial fluid which is contained inside the synovial membrane called the joint capsule.
The articular capsule of the knee joint (commonly referred to as the capsular ligament) is the wide and lax joint capsule of the knee.

Fibular collateral ligament

lateral collateral ligamentLCLfibular
(The fibular collateral ligament is often considered with tibiofemoral components.)
The fibular collateral ligament (long external lateral ligament or lateral collateral ligament, LCL) is a ligament located on the lateral (outer) side of the knee, and thus belongs to the extrinsic knee ligaments and posterolateral corner of the knee.

Sesamoid bone

sesamoidsesamoid bonesulnar sesamoid
Because it is the largest sesamoid bone in the human body, the ossification process takes significantly longer.

Lateral meniscus

lateralexternal semilunar fibrocartilage
These two disks, the medial meniscus and the lateral meniscus, consist of connective tissue with extensive collagen fibers containing cartilage-like cells.
The lateral meniscus (external semilunar fibrocartilage) is a fibrocartilaginous band that spans the lateral side of the interior of the knee joint.

Posterior cruciate ligament

PCLposteriorCaudal cruciate ligament
The posterior cruciate ligament (PCL) stretches from medial condyle of femur to the posterior intercondylar area.
The posterior cruciate ligament (or PCL) is one of the four major ligaments of the knee.

Medial meniscus

medial
These two disks, the medial meniscus and the lateral meniscus, consist of connective tissue with extensive collagen fibers containing cartilage-like cells.
The medial meniscus is a fibrocartilage semicircular band that spans the knee joint medially, located between the medial condyle of the femur and the medial condyle of the tibia.

Meniscus (anatomy)

meniscusmeniscimeniscal
There are two types of joint cartilage in the knees: fibrous cartilage (the meniscus) and hyaline cartilage.
In humans they are present in the knee, wrist, acromioclavicular, sternoclavicular, and temporomandibular joints; in other animals they may be present in other joints.

Posterior meniscofemoral ligament

posterior
The posterior and anterior meniscofemoral ligaments stretch from the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus to the medial femoral condyle.
The Posterior meniscofemoral ligament (also known as the ligament of Wrisberg) is a small fibrous band of the knee joint.

Cartilage

cartilaginouscartilagescartilagenous
At birth, the kneecap is just formed from cartilage, and this will ossify (change to bone) between the ages of three and five years.
The mechanical properties of articular cartilage in load-bearing joints such as the knee and hip have been studied extensively at macro, micro, and nano-scales.

Anterior cruciate ligament

ACLanterior cruciatecranial cruciate ligament
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) stretches from the lateral condyle of femur to the anterior intercondylar area.
The anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) is one of a pair of cruciate ligaments (the other being the posterior cruciate ligament) in the human knee.

Articularis genus muscle

articularis genusArticularis genu muscle
The suprapatellar bursa is prevented from being pinched during extension by the articularis genus muscle.
The articularis genus (subcrureus) is a small skeletal muscle located anteriorly on the thigh just above the knee.

Knee bursae

suprapatellar bursabursaebursae of the knee
The largest communicative bursa is the suprapatellar bursa described above.

Cruciate ligament

cruciatecruciate ligamentscruciate knee ligament
The knee is stabilized by a pair of cruciate ligaments.
They occur in several joints of the body, such as the knee joint and the atlanto-axial joint.

Anterior meniscofemoral ligament

articulatio meniscolateralis anterior
The posterior and anterior meniscofemoral ligaments stretch from the posterior horn of the lateral meniscus to the medial femoral condyle.
The anterior meniscofemoral ligament (ligament of Humphry) is a small fibrous band of the knee joint.

Anterior compartment of thigh

anterior compartmentanterior compartment of the thighanterior
The muscles responsible for the movement of the knee joint belong to either the anterior, medial or posterior compartment of the thigh.
The anterior compartment of thigh contains muscles which extend the knee and flex the hip.

Condyle

condylescondylarcondylus
The main articular bodies of the femur are its lateral and medial condyles.

Popliteus muscle

popliteusPopliteal musclecyamella
The arcuate popliteal ligament originates on the apex of the head of the fibula to stretch proximally, crosses the tendon of the popliteus muscle, and passes into the capsule.
The popliteus muscle in the leg is used for unlocking the knees when walking, by laterally rotating the femur on the tibia during the closed chain portion of the gait cycle (one with the foot in contact with the ground).

Posterior compartment of thigh

posterior compartmentposterior compartment of the thighback of the
The muscles responsible for the movement of the knee joint belong to either the anterior, medial or posterior compartment of the thigh.
The posterior compartment of the thigh is one of the fascial compartments that contains the knee flexors and hip extensors known as the hamstring muscles, as well as vascular and nervous elements, particularly the sciatic nerve.

Hinge joint

ginglymushinge-jointginglymoid
The knee is a modified hinge joint, which permits flexion and extension as well as slight internal and external rotation.
The knee joints and ankle joints are less typical, as they allow a slight degree of rotation or of side-to-side movement in certain positions of the limb.