A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Portrait from c. late 17th–18th century

William Wallace

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Portrait from c. late 17th–18th century
Personal seal of Sir William Wallace, found on a letter written on 11 October 1297, to the mayor of Lübeck, Germany.
Statue of Wallace at Edinburgh Castle
Wallace statue by D. W. Stevenson on the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh
The later Stirling Bridge
William Wallace Statue, Aberdeen
Wallace's trial in Westminster Hall. Painting by Daniel Maclise
Plaque marking the place of Wallace's execution

Sir William Wallace (Uilleam Uallas, ; Norman French: William le Waleys; c. 127023 August 1305) was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence.

An early example of the miles christianus allegory in a manuscript of the Summa Vitiorum by William Peraldus, mid 13th century. The knight is equipped with a detailed Armour of God, including an early depiction of the Shield of the Trinity, and he is crowned by an angel holding the gloss non coronabuntur nisi qui legitime certaverint "none will be crowned but those who truly struggle" and in the other hand a list of the seven beatitudes, matched with the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit and the seven heavenly virtues which in turn are set against the seven cardinal vices.

Miles Christianus

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Christian allegory based on New Testament military metaphors, especially the Armor of God metaphor of military equipment standing for Christian virtues and on certain passages of the Old Testament from the Latin Vulgate.

Christian allegory based on New Testament military metaphors, especially the Armor of God metaphor of military equipment standing for Christian virtues and on certain passages of the Old Testament from the Latin Vulgate.

An early example of the miles christianus allegory in a manuscript of the Summa Vitiorum by William Peraldus, mid 13th century. The knight is equipped with a detailed Armour of God, including an early depiction of the Shield of the Trinity, and he is crowned by an angel holding the gloss non coronabuntur nisi qui legitime certaverint "none will be crowned but those who truly struggle" and in the other hand a list of the seven beatitudes, matched with the seven gifts of the Holy Spirit and the seven heavenly virtues which in turn are set against the seven cardinal vices.
The Christi milites to the left of the Adoration of the Mystic Lamb in the Ghent Altarpiece (c. 1430)

Chivalry as the idealized image of knighthood was a common moral allegory in early Christian literature.

Zawisza Czarny in a detail of Jan Matejko's Battle of Grunwald

Zawisza Czarny

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Zawisza Czarny of Garbow (c.

Zawisza Czarny of Garbow (c.

Zawisza Czarny in a detail of Jan Matejko's Battle of Grunwald
Grant of 800 grzywna by King Władysław Jagiełło to Zawisza Czarny in 1414.

undefined 1379 – 12 June 1428), also known as Zawisza the Black, of Sulima coat of arms, was a Polish knight and nobleman who served as a commander and diplomat under Polish king Władysław II Jagiełło and Hungarian-Bohemian king Sigismund of Luxembourg.

A pasha's Tugh with two horse tails

Pasha

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Higher rank in the Ottoman political and military system, typically granted to governors, generals, dignitaries, and others.

Higher rank in the Ottoman political and military system, typically granted to governors, generals, dignitaries, and others.

A pasha's Tugh with two horse tails
Mustafa Kemal Pasha
Enver Pasha
Ahmed Muhtar Pasha
Osman Nuri Pasha
Donizetti Pasha
Gordon Pasha
Stone Pasha

As an honorary title, Pasha, in one of its various ranks, is similar to a British peerage or knighthood, and was also one of the highest titles in the 20th-century Kingdom of Egypt.

Bascinet without accessories.

Bascinet

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Medieval European open-faced combat helmet.

Medieval European open-faced combat helmet.

Bascinet without accessories.
Bascinet with a bretache (nose protection) and aventail (chainmail neck protection).
A bascinet with a rounded visor.
Tomb effigy showing a bascinet with baviere, worn with a plate gorget and a decorative orle. The helmet would be free to rotate within the gorget. English c. 1450
Early great bascinet, c. 1400, with plate gorget and exaggeratedly tall skull. Note how the skull of the helmet is riveted to the rear gorget plate.
Later great bascinet (c. 1440) with rounded skull and visor - showing the position of the wearer's head and the rotation of the visor
Illustration from a 15th-century manuscript showing horsemen wearing bascinets with the rounded visor used from c. 1410
Knight wearing a great bascinet. The strap fixing the helmet to the breastplate is visible as is the impossibility of rotating the helmet. German painting of 1435, by Konrad Witz
A late-period great bascinet for tournament use. Note the skull and back gorget are formed in one piece, and there are strapping points to secure the helmet to the cuirass.

By the middle of the 14th century, most knights had discarded the great helm altogether in favor of a fully visored bascinet.

Title page of the first Castilian-language translation of Tirant lo Blanc, printed in Valladolid by Diego de Gumiel

Joanot Martorell

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Title page of the first Castilian-language translation of Tirant lo Blanc, printed in Valladolid by Diego de Gumiel

Joanot Martorell (c. 1410 – 1465) was a Valencian knight and writer, best-known for authoring the novel Tirant lo Blanch, written in Valencian and published at Valencia in 1490.

Philip Riedesel zu Camberg

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Philip Riedesel zu Camberg was an important German knight (Ritter) in the latter half of the 16th century.

heraldic coronet of a jonkheer.

Jonkheer

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Honorific in the Low Countries denoting the lowest rank within the nobility.

Honorific in the Low Countries denoting the lowest rank within the nobility.

heraldic coronet of a jonkheer.

The coronet of rank for the untitled nobility in the Netherlands and Belgium is the same as that for the rank of a hereditary knight, i.e. Ridder: a plain circlet of gold with eight golden points, each topped with a pearl; five of them are seen in a representation.

1436 fresco depicting Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello, Duomo, Florence. With Renaissance grotto-esque candelabra decorated frame added by Lorenzo di Credi in 1524. The Latin inscription reads: Ioannes Acutus eques brittanicus dux aetatis suae cautissimus et rei militaris peritissimus habitus est ("John Hawkwood, British knight, most prudent leader of his age and most expert in the art of war").

John Hawkwood

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English soldier who served as a mercenary leader or condottiero in Italy.

English soldier who served as a mercenary leader or condottiero in Italy.

1436 fresco depicting Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello, Duomo, Florence. With Renaissance grotto-esque candelabra decorated frame added by Lorenzo di Credi in 1524. The Latin inscription reads: Ioannes Acutus eques brittanicus dux aetatis suae cautissimus et rei militaris peritissimus habitus est ("John Hawkwood, British knight, most prudent leader of his age and most expert in the art of war").
Engraving based on fresco of John Hawkwood
Arms of Hawkwood: Argent, on a chevron sable three escallops of the field, as seen on his fresco in the Duomo, Florence

Although Hawkwood was knighted, there is no clear evidence by whom or where.

Historical re-enactment of an asbaran cataphract

Aswaran

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Cavalry force that formed the backbone of the army of the Sasanian Empire.

Cavalry force that formed the backbone of the army of the Sasanian Empire.

Historical re-enactment of an asbaran cataphract
Historical re-enactment of an asbaran cataphract
Sasanian silverware, showing a combat between two noble horsemen wearing scale armor, cuirass, chaps, and equipped with kontos, swords, quivers and arrows.
Illustration of an asbaran cavalryman holding a banner showing a Homa, a mythical bird of Iranian legends and fables.
Equestrian statue of Khosrow II (r. 590–628) wearing the same armor used by the asbaran.

The asbaran have often been demonstrated as an example of existence of feudalism in Iran by modern scholars, who simply refer them as either chevalier, knight, or ritter.