A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

109 related topics with Alpha

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Renaissance-era depiction of a joust in traditional or "high" armour, based on then-historical late medieval armour (Paulus Hector Mair, de arte athletica, 1540s)

Jousting

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Martial game or hastilude between two horse riders wielding lances with blunted tips, often as part of a tournament.

Martial game or hastilude between two horse riders wielding lances with blunted tips, often as part of a tournament.

Renaissance-era depiction of a joust in traditional or "high" armour, based on then-historical late medieval armour (Paulus Hector Mair, de arte athletica, 1540s)
Depiction of a late 13th-century joust in the Codex Manesse. Joust by Walther von Klingen.
Depiction of a standing joust in an Alsatian manuscript of ca. 1420 (CPG 359); protection for the legs of the riders is integrated into the horse armour.
The Stechzeug of John the Constant (c. 1500). The shield strapped to his left shoulder is called an ecranche.
Jousting at Middelaldercentret
Armor of Ferdinand I, Holy Roman Emperor, 1549
Parade Armour of Henry II of France, c. 1553-55
Armour for King Henry VIII by Matthew Bisanz, 1544
Armour worn by King Henry VIII

From 10 July to 9 August 1434, the Leonese Knight Suero de Quiñones and ten of his companions encamped in a field beside a bridge and challenged each knight who wished to cross it to a joust.

A Seal of the Knights Templar

Knights Templar

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Catholic military order, one of the most wealthy and popular of the Western Christian military orders.

Catholic military order, one of the most wealthy and popular of the Western Christian military orders.

A Seal of the Knights Templar
Flag used by the Templars in battle.
The first headquarters of the Knights Templar, on the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. The Crusaders called it "the Temple of Solomon" and from this location derived their name of Templar.
Battle of Hattin in 1187, the turning point leading to the Third Crusade. From a copy of the Passages d’outremer, c.1490.
Convent of Christ Castle in Tomar, Portugal. Built in 1160 as a stronghold for the Knights Templar, it became the headquarters of the renamed Order of Christ. In 1983, it was named a UNESCO World Heritage Site.
Templars being burned at the stake.
Templar chapel from the 12th century in Metz, France. Once part of the Templar commandery of Metz, the oldest Templar institution of the Holy Roman Empire.
Templar building at Saint Martin des Champs, France
Representation of a Knight Templar (Ten Duinen Abbey museum, 2010 photograph)
Depiction of two Templars seated on a horse (emphasising poverty), with Beauséant, the "sacred banner" (or gonfanon) of the Templars, argent a chief sable (Matthew Paris, c. 1250).
Temple Church, London. As the chapel of the New Temple in London, it was the location for Templar initiation ceremonies. In modern times it is the parish church of the Middle and Inner Temples, two of the Inns of Court, and a popular tourist attraction.

In 1119, the French knight Hugues de Payens approached King Baldwin II of Jerusalem and Warmund, Patriarch of Jerusalem, and proposed creating a monastic order for the protection of these pilgrims.

Order of the Holy Sepulchre

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Catholic order of knighthood under the protection of the Holy See.

Catholic order of knighthood under the protection of the Holy See.

Church of the Holy Sepulchre (1885). Other than some restoration work, its appearance has essentially not changed since 1854.
The Order of the Holy Sepulchre traces its roots to circa 1099 under the Frankish knight Godfrey of Bouillon (1060–1100), "advocate of the Holy Sepulchre" (Advocatus Sancti Sepulchri), leader of the First Crusade and first ruler of the Kingdom of Jerusalem. Fresco by Giacomo Jaquerio in Saluzzo, northern Italy (circa 1420).
Detail of a miniature of King Philip II of France arriving in the Holy Land.
The Vida (text in red) of the medieval troubadours Tomier and Palaizi, who exclusively advocated defence of the Holy Sepulchre, consequently—in contrast to Lanfranc Cigala—criticising the Albigensian Crusades as distractions, even to the point of resulting in marks of heresy.
The Aedicule inside the church, said to enclose the tomb of Jesus Christ.
Contemporary Franciscan friars during the procession on the Calvary in the Church of the Holy Sepulchre (2006).
Eberhard I, Duke of Württemberg (1492). The Duke chose a palm as his personal symbol in commemoration of his pilgrimage to Jerusalem in 1468 when he became a knight of the Holy Sepulchre.
Interior of the 15th-century Jeruzalemkerk (Bruges), 2011
Pope Alexander VI restored the Order of Holy Sepulchre to independent status in 1496, and reserved its title of Grand Master for himself and his successors.
Pope Leo X with his Cardinal-cousin Giulio de' Medici (left), future Pope Clement VII, in painting by Raphael (1519). Both endorsed the dubbing of knights.
Cardinal Edwin Frederick O'Brien, Grand Master of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre 2011–2019, during a pilgrimage in Rome (2013).
The Palazzo Della Rovere, the order's international headquarters where its Grand Magisterium is situated.
Coat of arms of the Kingdom of Jerusalem.
Members and regalia during a ceremony of investiture in Fulda, Germany, in 2009.
The remains of Blessed Bartolo Longo (1841–1926), inside the Shrine of the Virgin of the Rosary of Pompei in Italy.
Entrance of the Church of the Holy Sepulchre.
Flag of the Order of the Holy Sepulchre over the Palazzo della Rovere.
The Arab-Norman Chiesa di San Cataldo, local church to the order in Palermo, Sicily, since 1937.
Notre Dame de Paris in France, where the Relics of Sainte-Chapelle are exposed by the Knights of the Holy Sepulchre.
Investiture in Dresden, Germany, in 2010.
Inside Dresden Cathedral, 9 October 2010.
Procession in honour of Saint Liborius of Le Mans with Knights of the Holy Sepulchre together with Teutonic Knights in Paderborn, Germany.
Pope Alexander VI restored the Order of Holy Sepulchre to independent status in 1496, and reserved its title of Grand Master for himself and his successors.
Pope Leo X with his Cardinal-cousin Giulio de' Medici (left), future Pope Clement VII, in painting by Raphael (1519). Both endorsed the dubbing of knights.

The term equestrian in this context is consistent with its use for orders of knighthood of the Holy See, referring to the chivalric and knightly nature of order—by sovereign prerogative conferring knighthood on recipients—derived from the equestrians (equites), a social class in Ancient Rome.

German man-at-arms 1498 by Albrecht Dürer. The equipment is that of a demi-lancer.

Man-at-arms

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Soldier of the High Medieval to Renaissance periods who was typically well-versed in the use of arms and served as a fully-armoured heavy cavalryman.

Soldier of the High Medieval to Renaissance periods who was typically well-versed in the use of arms and served as a fully-armoured heavy cavalryman.

German man-at-arms 1498 by Albrecht Dürer. The equipment is that of a demi-lancer.
Armour of an early 16th-century man-at-arms
English man-at-arms, funerary brass c. 1431
Fully armoured gendarmes from the Italian Wars (mid 16th century).
Armour for man-at-arms and fully barded horse, Royal Armory of Madrid

A man-at-arms could be a knight, or other nobleman, a member of a knight's or nobleman's retinue, or a mercenary in a company serving under a captain.

The Investiture of Dame Lourett Russell Grant into the " Order of The Holy Sepulchre "

Dame

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Honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of damehood in many Christian chivalric orders, as well as the British honours system and those of several other Commonwealth countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, with the masculine form of address being Sir.

Honorific title and the feminine form of address for the honour of damehood in many Christian chivalric orders, as well as the British honours system and those of several other Commonwealth countries, such as Australia and New Zealand, with the masculine form of address being Sir.

The Investiture of Dame Lourett Russell Grant into the " Order of The Holy Sepulchre "

It is the female equivalent for knighthood, which is traditionally granted to males.

The Crusader States in 1135

Crusader states

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The Crusader States, also known as Outremer, were four Roman Catholic realms in the Middle East that lasted from 1098 to 1291.

The Crusader States, also known as Outremer, were four Roman Catholic realms in the Middle East that lasted from 1098 to 1291.

The Crusader States in 1135
The Church of the Holy Sepulchre
Anatolia at the beginning of the First Crusade (1097)
Godfrey of Bouillon during the siege of Jerusalem (from the 14th-century Roman de Godefroi de Bouillon)
Montréal castle
Kings Louis VIII and Conrad III meet Queen Melisende and King Baldwin III at Acre from a 13th-century codex
Saladin and Guy fight from a 13th-century manuscript of Matthew Paris's chronicle
The crusader states after Saladin's conquests and before the Third Crusade
Map of Lesser Armenia in 1200
A 13th-century manuscript of the marriage of Frederick and Isabella
Krak des Chevaliers
The feudatories of the king of Jerusalem in 1187
13th-century miniature of Baldwin II of Jerusalem granting the Al Aqsa Mosque to Hugues de Payens
Coins of the Kingdom of Jerusalem from the British Museum. Left: European style Denier with Holy Sepulchre (1162–1175). Centre: Kufic gold bezant (1140–1180). Right: gold bezant with Christian symbol (1250s)
12th-century Hospitaller castle of Krak des Chevaliers in Syria

Violence was endemic, and a new class of mounted warriors, the knights, emerged.

A modern working stirrup on an endurance riding saddle

Stirrup

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Light frame or ring that holds the foot of a rider, attached to the saddle by a strap, often called a stirrup leather.

Light frame or ring that holds the foot of a rider, attached to the saddle by a strap, often called a stirrup leather.

A modern working stirrup on an endurance riding saddle
Depiction of a Kushan divinity using an early platform-style stirrup, circa AD 150. British Museum.
Stirrup from the Baekje (18 BC – 660 AD) kingdom of Korea
Haniwa horse statuette, complete with saddle and stirrups, 6th century, Kofun period, Japan.
Roman emperor Basil I the Macedonian and his son Leo on horses with stirrups. (From the Madrid Skylitzes, Biblioteca Nacional de España, Madrid).
10th century stirrup found in England
Modern fillis stirrups
Han dynasty mounting stirrup.
Han mounting stirrup
A funerary figurine with a mounting stirrup, dated AD 302, unearthed near Changsha.
Horse figurine with stirrup, Western Jin
The earliest extant double stirrup, from the tomb of Feng Sufu, a Han Chinese nobleman from the Northern Yan dynasty, 415 AD. Discovered in Beipiao, Liaoning.
Iron stirrups, Gaya confederacy
Metal stirrup in use for dressage

Among other advantages, stirrups provided greater balance and support to the rider, which allowed the knight to use a sword more efficiently without falling, especially against infantry adversaries.

Ottoman Sipahi heavy cavalry, c. 1550

Heavy cavalry

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Class of cavalry intended to deliver a battlefield charge and also to act as a tactical reserve; they are also often termed shock cavalry.

Class of cavalry intended to deliver a battlefield charge and also to act as a tactical reserve; they are also often termed shock cavalry.

Ottoman Sipahi heavy cavalry, c. 1550
Early 16th-century French gendarmes, with complete plate armour and heavy lances
Spanish Heavy Cavalry - Royal Armoury of Madrid, Spain
Alexander the Great on horseback
The oldest known relief of a heavily armoured cavalryman, from the Sasanian Empire, at Taq-i Bostan, near Kermanshah, Iran (4th century)
Northern Wei heavy cavalry
A recreation of a medieval joust between heavily armoured knights at a modern Renaissance fair
Contemporary depiction in the Liber ad honorem Augusti, of Dipold of Acerra, an early 13th-century knight, when the knight was undisputed master of the battlefield
Mongol heavy cavalry in battle (13th–14th century)
Christian the Younger of Brunswick in the armour of a cuirassier
A re-enactor dressed as a Winged Hussar, who served as the heavy cavalry of the Polish Commonwealth
French cuirassiers, 19th century

Among other advantages, stirrups provided greater balance and support to the rider, which allowed the knight to use a sword more efficiently without falling, especially against infantry adversaries.

Squire

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Wolfram von Eschenbach and his squire (Codex Manesse, 14th century)
A squire cleaning armour
A squire helping his knight, in a historical reenactment in 2009
A squire holds the warhorse of his knight, detail from monument to Sir Richard Stapledon (d.1326), Exeter Cathedral.

In the Middle Ages, a squire was the shield- or armour-bearer of a knight.

Title

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One or more words used before or after a person's name, in certain contexts.

One or more words used before or after a person's name, in certain contexts.

Sir – Used by knights and baronets