A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Vassal

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Person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch , in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe.

Person regarded as having a mutual obligation to a lord or monarch , in the context of the feudal system in medieval Europe.

A "lower" group consisted of landless knights attached to a count or duke.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion

Chivalric romance

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Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

Type of prose and verse narrative that was popular in the noble courts of High Medieval and Early Modern Europe.

Yvain fighting Gawain in order to regain the love of his lady Laudine. Medieval illumination from Chrétien de Troyes's romance, Yvain, le Chevalier au Lion
Holger Danske, or Ogier the Dane, from the Matter of France
A knight rescues a lady from a dragon.

Many medieval romances recount the marvellous adventures of a chivalrous, heroic knight, often of super-human ability, who, abiding chivalry's strict codes of honor and demeanor, goes on a quest, and fights and defeats monsters and giants, thereby winning favor with a lady.

Chevalier (Knight) medal insignia

Legion of Honour

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Highest French order of merit, both military and civil.

Highest French order of merit, both military and civil.

Chevalier (Knight) medal insignia
Louis Philippe I, King of the French, wearing the sash of the order.
Philippe Pétain and John J. Pershing were decorated with the Grand-croix of the Legion of Honor, as were several US generals with the Commandeur and Chevalier medal shortly after World War I in 1919.
Evolution of the insignia of the Legion d’Honneur from the First Empire to the Fifth Republic.
Insignia of the Grand Master at the Élysée Palace.
Notice of posthumous award of the Croix de Chevalier to Lieutenant Tessier—Mort pour la France ("Died for France") in World War I.
The five classes wearing their respective insignia (gentlemen): 1: Chevalier; 2: Officier; 3: Commandeur; 4: Grand-officier; 5: Grand-croix.
Original {{lang|fr|Légionnaire}} insignia (1804).
Late Empire {{lang|fr|Légionnaire}} insignia: the front features Napoleon's profile and the rear, the imperial Eagle. An imperial crown joins the cross and the ribbon.
Louis XVIII era (1814) Knight insignia: the front features Henry IV's profile and the rear, the arms of the French Kingdom (three {{lang|fr|fleurs-de-lis}}). A royal crown joins the cross and the ribbon.
Rear of a Republican cross, with two crossed French flags.
Fifth Republic Knight insignia: the centre features Marianne's head. A crown of laurels joins the cross and the ribbon.
Fifth Republic officer class, decorated with a rosette.
Chiang Kai-shek's {{lang|fr|Légion d'honneur}} plaque. In his day, the plaque was made of silver.
Chiang Kai-shek's {{lang|fr|Légion d'honneur}}. This is the reverse of his Grand Cross.
The insignia of a Grand Cross. Nowadays the star of a Grand Cross is gilt. The silver star is the Grand Officer's badge.
Charles Lindbergh's Legion of Honour.
Insignia with figure of Henry IV.
Certificate of the Order of the Legion of Honour.
Certificate for Major G M Reeves, a British recipient in 1958.
Commander of the Order of the Legion of Honour.
Rosette flanked both sides in gold, denoting the wearer has been awarded the Grand Cross of the Legion of Honour.
Set of the Grand Cross from the Third Republic, c.1871 consisting of sash, badge, star and original case of issue by Ouizille Lemoine et Fils of Paris.
Set of the Grand Cross from the Third Republic, c.1871 consisting of sash, badge, star, two rosettes and original case of issue by Ouizille Lemoine et Fils of Paris.
Grand Cross badge of the Legion d’Honneur, in gold by Ouizille Lemoine et Fils, from the Third Republic (Obverse).
Grand Cross badge of the Legion d’Honneur, in gold by Ouizille Lemoine et Fils, from the Third Republic (Reverse).
Grand Cross Breast Star of the Legion d’Honneur - Third Republic, c.1871 by Ouizille Lemoine et Fils Paris.
The Fourragère of the Legion of Honor
The Grand Cross of the Legion of Honor
The insignia of an officer class of the Legion d’Honneur from the current Fifth Republic.

The order is divided into five degrees of increasing distinction: Chevalier (Knight), Officier (Officer), Commandeur (Commander), Grand officier (Grand Officer), and Grand-croix (Grand Cross).

Lord Patten, robed as Chancellor of Oxford University, assisted by a page.

Page (servant)

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Traditionally a young male attendant or servant, but may also have been used for a messenger at the service of a nobleman.

Traditionally a young male attendant or servant, but may also have been used for a messenger at the service of a nobleman.

Lord Patten, robed as Chancellor of Oxford University, assisted by a page.
Alof de Wignacourt and his page, by Caravaggio, c. 1608.
The Queen and the Page, by Marianne Stokes, 1896.
Painting of a page boy with silver collar, Dutch, 17th century.

In medieval times, a page was an attendant to a nobleman, a knight, a governor or a Castellan.

List of noble families in Belgium

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A list of noble families in Modern Belgium with additions of former houses.

A list of noble families in Modern Belgium with additions of former houses.

Currently, the Belgian crown recognizes the titles of jonkheer, knight, baron, viscount, count, marquis, duke and prince.

A Laconian black-figured cup by Rider Painter featuring a member of the hippeus.

Hippeis

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Greek term for cavalry.

Greek term for cavalry.

A Laconian black-figured cup by Rider Painter featuring a member of the hippeus.
Fully armed Hippeus. Attic black-figure amphora, 550–540 BC (Louvre)
Roman mosaic depicting hippeus in combat with Amazon, 4th century AD (Louvre)

Its counterparts were the Roman equites (equestrians) and medieval knights.

Jean de Carrouges coat of arms De gueules fleurdelisé d'argent.

Jean de Carrouges

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Sir Jean de Carrouges IV (c.

Sir Jean de Carrouges IV (c.

Jean de Carrouges coat of arms De gueules fleurdelisé d'argent.
Medieval illumination depicting the Battle of Otterburn during border warfare between England and Scotland, from Jean Froissart's Chronicles
Palais de Justice, Paris
Battle of Nicopolis
Duel between Jacques Le Gris and Jean de Carrouges

1330s – 25 September 1396) was a French knight who governed estates in Normandy as a vassal of Count Pierre d'Alençon and who served under Admiral Jean de Vienne in several campaigns against the Kingdom of England.

This 15th-century depiction of Charlemagne and Pope Adrian I shows a well-bred medieval horse with arched neck, refined head and elegant gait.

Horses in the Middle Ages

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Horses in the Middle Ages differed in size, build and breed from the modern horse, and were, on average, smaller.

Horses in the Middle Ages differed in size, build and breed from the modern horse, and were, on average, smaller.

This 15th-century depiction of Charlemagne and Pope Adrian I shows a well-bred medieval horse with arched neck, refined head and elegant gait.
This 15th-century battle scene shows the powerfully-built horses used in warfare. From The Battle of San Romano by Paolo Uccello.
A Mughal nobleman (Sowar) on horseback.
Medieval people engaging in falconry from horseback. The horses appear to have the body type of palfreys or jennets. from the Codex Manesse.
Carolingian warrior on a war horse with lance, round shield, chainmail and spangenhelm, 8th century
A later print of a 15th-century joust
This 13th-century manuscript shows an approximate height of the medieval horse at the time, note the knights' legs extending well below the horses' barrels.
Wooden horse figurine, Tang dynasty
Ornate 16th-century armour for horse and knight, and typical high saddle. Royal Armoury, Stockholm
A bird on a man on a horse, Tang dynasty
A horse litter
A 13th-century depiction of a riding horse.
This horse is fitted with a horse collar to bear the weight of the harrow. October, Les Très Riches Heures du duc de Berry
Detail from 15th-century painting by Gentile da Fabriano, showing curb bits, with ornamental bosses at the sides of the mouthpiece
In this depiction of a medieval horse team, the lead pair have breast collars, while the trace pair wear horse collars. Note that one horse is saddled.
This medieval painting shows a beautiful woman in a dress mounted on a war horse, riding astride, not sidesaddle.
Depiction of a lady riding in an early sidesaddle of a design credited to Anne of Bohemia (1366-1394) – Gerard Horenbout, 16th century.

While light cavalry had been used in warfare for many centuries, the medieval era saw the rise of heavy cavalry, particularly the European knight.

Insignia of a Knight of the Order of St. Patrick

Order of St Patrick

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Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland.

Dormant British order of chivalry associated with Ireland.

Insignia of a Knight of the Order of St. Patrick
The installation dinner for the founding of the order took place on 17 March 1783 in the Great Hall of Dublin Castle.
The 2nd Earl of Dudley (Lord Lieutenant of Ireland, 1902–1905) wearing the Irish Crown Jewels as ex officio Grand Master of the Order of St Patrick.
Knight of the Order of Saint Patrick
The Irish Crown Jewels
St Patrick's Cathedral in Dublin was the Chapel of the Order.
A panel recording some members of the Order of St Patrick in St Patrick's Cathedral, Dublin.

The statutes of the Order restricted membership to men who were both knights and gentlemen, the latter being defined as having three generations of "noblesse" (meaning ancestors bearing coats of arms) on both their father's and mother's side.

Infantry were the first military forces in history. This warrior statuette demonstrates that military culture was an important part of historical societies, c.480 BC, Staatliche Antikensammlungen.

Military history

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Humanities discipline within the scope of general historical recording of armed conflict in the history of humanity, and its impact on the societies, cultures and economies thereof, as well as the resulting changes to local and international relationships.

Humanities discipline within the scope of general historical recording of armed conflict in the history of humanity, and its impact on the societies, cultures and economies thereof, as well as the resulting changes to local and international relationships.

Infantry were the first military forces in history. This warrior statuette demonstrates that military culture was an important part of historical societies, c.480 BC, Staatliche Antikensammlungen.
The Canadian War Museum.
Relief of Ramses II located in Abu Simbel fighting at the Battle of Kadesh on a chariot.
A Greek trireme
Japanese samurai boarding Mongol ships in 1281
Illustration of an "eruptor," a proto-cannon, capable of firing cast-iron bombs filled with gunpowder, from the 14th century Ming Dynasty book Huolongjing
A small English Civil War-era cannon
A 155 mm M198 howitzer firing a shell
The 3rd-century Great Ludovisi sarcophagus depicts a battle between Romans and Goths.
Battle of Crécy (1346) between the English and French in the Hundred Years' War.
The victory of the Polish-Lithuanian forces over the Muscovites at the Battle of Orsha in 1514
Eighty Years' War, or Dutch Revolt against Spain, painting by Sebastiaen Vrancx
Franco-Prussian War

Knight (see also: Chivalry)