Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

109 related topics

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Homage in the Middle Ages

Homage (feudal)

The ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

The ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Homage in the Middle Ages

The implication was that no "knights service" was owed for the English lands.

Geometrical construction of the Reuleaux triangle style of heater shield, for use as an heraldic escutcheon

Heater shield

Form of European medieval shield, developing from the early medieval kite shield in the late 12th century in response to the declining importance of the shield in combat thanks to improvements in leg armour.

Form of European medieval shield, developing from the early medieval kite shield in the late 12th century in response to the declining importance of the shield in combat thanks to improvements in leg armour.

Geometrical construction of the Reuleaux triangle style of heater shield, for use as an heraldic escutcheon
Effigy of William Longespée the Younger (d. 1250) in Salisbury Cathedral, showing an early triangular heater shield
Heraldic roll of arms displaying heater-shaped heraldic shields or escutcheons. Hyghalmen Roll, Germany, late 15th century

The heater shield was used by almost every class of society in medieval Europe, from knights to typical soldiers.

White Knight (Fitzgibbon family)

The White Knight is one of three Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthoods within Ireland dating from the medieval period.

heraldic coronet of a jonkheer.

List of noble families in Belgium

A list of noble families in Modern Belgium with additions of former houses.

A list of noble families in Modern Belgium with additions of former houses.

heraldic coronet of a jonkheer.

Currently, the Belgian crown recognizes the titles of jonkheer, knight, baron, viscount, count, marquis, duke and prince.

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Infantry

Military specialization which engages in ground combat on foot.

Military specialization which engages in ground combat on foot.

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Various infantry of the 17th through 18th century (halberdier, arquebusier, pikeman, and mix of musketeers and grenadiers) of Duchy of Württemberg
Infantry of the US 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment enter their M2 Bradley IFV during a combat patrol, Tall Afar, Iraq, 2006
Ancient Greek infantry of the Greco-Persian Wars (499–449 BC): light infantry (left, slinger), and the heavy infantry (middle and right, hoplites)
Rocroi, el último tercio ("Roicroi, the last tercio") by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, portraying infantry of a battered Spanish tercio at the 1643 Battle of Rocroi
French infantry line performing a bayonet charge in 1913
Swiss infantry kits arrayed in front of a field kitchen in Spitalacker, Bern during a workers' strike, c. 1918
US Army infantryman c. 1973
US ALICE
Russian weapons from the 13th to 17th centuries
The Roman testudo performed during a siege, as shown on Trajan's Column.
Ancient depiction of infantry formations, from the Stele of the Vultures, Early Dynastic Period (Mesopotamia), c. 2500 BC
The charge of the French Cuirassiers at the Battle of Waterloo against a British infantry square
Canadian army reserve infantrymen train in urban operations

After the fall of Rome, the quality of heavy infantry declined, and warfare was dominated by heavy cavalry, such as knights, forming small elite units for decisive shock combat, supported by peasant infantry militias and assorted light infantry from the lower classes.

A 14th-century Polish fresco at Siedlęcin Tower depicting Lancelot fighting the evil knight Turquine in a scene from the French Vulgate Cycle

Thomas Malory

Sir Thomas Malory (c.

Sir Thomas Malory (c.

A 14th-century Polish fresco at Siedlęcin Tower depicting Lancelot fighting the evil knight Turquine in a scene from the French Vulgate Cycle

He was knighted before 8 October 1441, became a professional soldier, and served under Henry Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick—but all dates are vague, and it is not known how he became distinguished.

Various Eastern maces, from left: Bozdogan/buzdygan (Ottoman), tabar-shishpar (Indian), shishpar (Indian), shishpar (unknown), gurz (Indian), shishpar (Indian).

Mace (bludgeon)

Blunt weapon, a type of club or virge that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful strikes.

Blunt weapon, a type of club or virge that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful strikes.

Various Eastern maces, from left: Bozdogan/buzdygan (Ottoman), tabar-shishpar (Indian), shishpar (Indian), shishpar (unknown), gurz (Indian), shishpar (Indian).
A mural of Bhima with his mace
A prehistoric earthenware mace found in central Serbia
Moche stone maces. Larco Museum Collection (Lima-Peru)
Calcite mace head, 7-6th millennium BC, Syria
Assyrian soldier holding a mace and a bow. Detail of a basalt relief from the palace of Tiglath-pileser III at Hadatu, Syria. 744–727 BCE. Ancient Orient Museum, Istanbul
Pernach (left) and two shestopyors
Shestopyor-type mace (in literal translation six-feathers) used by the rotmistrzs of the private army of the Radziwiłł family.
Mace polearm wielding figurine from the tomb of Ming dynasty prince Zhu Tan, 10th son of the Hongwu Emperor
World War I trench raiding club
Mace of the Royal Society, granted by Charles II
Marshal of Poland mace
Ceremonial maces of the Rector Magnificus of the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines.
Indian shishpar (flanged mace), all steel construction, with eight knife edged, hinged flanges, 18th-19th century, 26 inches long.
Indian shishpar (flanged mace), steel with solid shaft and eight flanged head, 24in.
Indian (Deccan) tabar-shishpar, an extremely rare combination tabar axe and shishpar eight flanged mace, steel with hollow shaft, 21.75 in. 17th to 18th century.

For a heavily armed Persian knight, a mace was as effective as a sword or battle axe.

Monarchy of the United Kingdom

Constitutional form of government by which a hereditary sovereign reigns as the head of state of the United Kingdom, the Crown Dependencies and the British Overseas Territories.

Constitutional form of government by which a hereditary sovereign reigns as the head of state of the United Kingdom, the Crown Dependencies and the British Overseas Territories.

The English Bill of Rights of 1689 curtailed the sovereign's governmental power.
The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Norman Conquest of 1066.
In 1603 James VI and I became the first monarch to rule over England, Scotland, and Ireland together.
England and Scotland were united as the Kingdom of Great Britain under Queen Anne in 1707.
The union of Great Britain and Ireland into the United Kingdom occurred in 1801 during the reign of King George III.
Map of the British Empire in 1921
Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the British throne
Buckingham Palace, the monarch's principal residence
Holyrood Palace, the monarch's official Scottish residence
The coat of arms of Elizabeth II in the United Kingdom. The design, in use since the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, features the arms of England in the first and fourth quarters, Scotland in the second, and Ireland in the third. In Scotland a separate version is used (shown right) whereby the Arms of Scotland take precedence.

The Crown creates all peerages, appoints members of the orders of chivalry, grants knighthoods and awards other honours.

The classic knight's surcoat is on the left; the knight on the right has a different style, possibly a jupon

Surcoat

Outer garment that was commonly worn in the Middle Ages by both men and women in Western Europe.

Outer garment that was commonly worn in the Middle Ages by both men and women in Western Europe.

The classic knight's surcoat is on the left; the knight on the right has a different style, possibly a jupon
Saint Stephen, King of Hungary with a jupon bearing his arms, white and red stripes. Image from the Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle
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An early example of a sideless surcoat, {{circa|1325-1335}}
A sideless surcoat with gaping armholes, late 14th century
Sideless surcoat edged with ermine, {{circa|1460}}
A furred, embellished surcoat worn for ceremonial purposes, 1489-1499

From about the 12th century, knights wore long, flowing surcoats, frequently emblazoned with their personal arms, over their armor.

Ireland in 1450, showing the Geraldine earldoms of Kildare and Desmond

Edmund FitzGibbon

Edmund Fitzgibbon, 11th White Knight (c.

Edmund Fitzgibbon, 11th White Knight (c.

Ireland in 1450, showing the Geraldine earldoms of Kildare and Desmond

1552 – 23 April 1608), was an Irish nobleman of the FitzGerald dynasty, who held a Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthood.