A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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White Knight (Fitzgibbon family)

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The White Knight is one of three Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthoods within Ireland dating from the medieval period.

Grand Cross set of the Order (1st type)

Order of St. Olav

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Norwegian order of chivalry instituted by King Oscar I on 21 August 1847.

Norwegian order of chivalry instituted by King Oscar I on 21 August 1847.

Grand Cross set of the Order (1st type)
The Star of The Order of Saint Olav
Design of the collar of the Order of St. Olav since 1906.
Order of Saint Olav Grand Cross with swords badge 1st Type
Order of Saint Olav Grand Cross with swords badge 2nd Type
Order of St Olav - Commander
Order of St Olav - Commander
Order of St Olav - Commander
Order of St. Olav Grand Cross badge
Order of St. Olav Grand Cross Star
Order of St. Olav Knights Class
Order of St. Olav Grand Cross Star - 2nd Type
Order of St. Olav Grand Cross Star - 1st Type
Order of St. Olav Collar and Star
Order of St. Olav Grand Officer Star - 1st Type
Order of St. Olav Grand Officer Badge - 1st Type
Order of St. Olav Knight - 1st Type

Knight, which is divided into two classes:

First page of only surviving manuscript, c. 14th century

Sir Gawain and the Green Knight

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Late 14th-century chivalric romance in Middle English.

Late 14th-century chivalric romance in Middle English.

First page of only surviving manuscript, c. 14th century
Sir Gawain and the Green Knight (from original manuscript, artist unknown)
The legendary Irish figure Cúchulainn faced a trial similar to Gawain's (Cúchulain Slays the Hound of Culain by Stephen Reid, 1904).
Knights of Gawain's time were tested in their ability to balance the male-oriented chivalric code with the female-oriented rules of courtly love. (God Speed! – Edmund Blair Leighton 1900)
In the 15th-century Saint Wolfgang and the Devil by Michael Pacher, the Devil is green. Poetic contemporaries such as Chaucer also drew connections between the colour green and the devil, leading scholars to draw similar connections in readings of the Green Knight.
Another famous Arthurian woman, The Lady of Shalott, with a medieval girdle around her waist (John William Waterhouse, 1888)
Gawain's Shield, with the endless pentagram in gold on a red background
Gawain represented the perfect knight, as a fighter, a lover, and a religious devotee. (The Vigil by John Pettie, 1884)
Scholars have pointed out parallels between the girdle Bertilak's wife offers Gawain, and the fruit Eve offered to Adam in the Biblical Garden of Eden. (Adam and Eve Lucas Cranach, ca. 1513)
Lady Bertilak at Gawain's bed (from original manuscript, artist unknown)
Lud's Church

The knight's code of honour requires him to do whatever a damsel asks.

Typical Freiherr coronet with seven pearls, as used on a coat of arms

Freiherr

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Typical Freiherr coronet with seven pearls, as used on a coat of arms

Freiherr (male, abbreviated as Frhr.), Freifrau (his wife, abbreviated as Frfr., literally "free lord" or "free lady") and Freiin (, his unmarried daughters and maiden aunts) are designations used as titles of nobility in the German-speaking areas of the Holy Roman Empire, and in its various successor states, including Austria, Prussia, Bavaria, Liechtenstein, Luxembourg, etc. Traditionally it denotes the titled rank within the nobility above Ritter (knight) and Edler (nobility without a specific title) and below Graf (count, earl).

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Infantry

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Military specialization which engages in ground combat on foot.

Military specialization which engages in ground combat on foot.

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Various infantry of the 17th through 18th century (halberdier, arquebusier, pikeman, and mix of musketeers and grenadiers) of Duchy of Württemberg
Infantry of the US 3rd Armored Cavalry Regiment enter their M2 Bradley IFV during a combat patrol, Tall Afar, Iraq, 2006
Ancient Greek infantry of the Greco-Persian Wars (499–449 BC): light infantry (left, slinger), and the heavy infantry (middle and right, hoplites)
Rocroi, el último tercio ("Roicroi, the last tercio") by Augusto Ferrer-Dalmau, portraying infantry of a battered Spanish tercio at the 1643 Battle of Rocroi
French infantry line performing a bayonet charge in 1913
Swiss infantry kits arrayed in front of a field kitchen in Spitalacker, Bern during a workers' strike, c. 1918
US Army infantryman c. 1973
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Russian weapons from the 13th to 17th centuries
The Roman testudo performed during a siege, as shown on Trajan's Column.
Ancient depiction of infantry formations, from the Stele of the Vultures, Early Dynastic Period (Mesopotamia), c. 2500 BC
The charge of the French Cuirassiers at the Battle of Waterloo against a British infantry square
Canadian army reserve infantrymen train in urban operations

After the fall of Rome, the quality of heavy infantry declined, and warfare was dominated by heavy cavalry, such as knights, forming small elite units for decisive shock combat, supported by peasant infantry militias and assorted light infantry from the lower classes.

The classic knight's surcoat is on the left; the knight on the right has a different style, possibly a jupon

Surcoat

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Outer garment that was commonly worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers.

Outer garment that was commonly worn in the Middle Ages by soldiers.

The classic knight's surcoat is on the left; the knight on the right has a different style, possibly a jupon
Saint Stephen, King of Hungary with a jupon bearing his arms, white and red stripes. Image from the Hungarian Illuminated Chronicle
{{circa|1300-1310}}
An early example of a sideless surcoat, {{circa|1325-1335}}
A sideless surcoat with gaping armholes, late 14th century
Sideless surcoat edged with ermine, {{circa|1460}}
A furred, embellished surcoat worn for ceremonial purposes, 1489-1499

From about the 12th century, knights wore long, flowing surcoats, frequently emblazoned with their personal arms, over their armor.

The Accolade (1901), by Edmund Leighton

Accolade

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The Accolade (1901), by Edmund Leighton
King John II of France in a ceremony of "adoubement", early 15th century miniature
Accolade performed by Queen Beatrix of the Netherlands during the Military Order of William ceremony of Marco Kroon in 2009
King George VI knights General Oliver Leese in the field, 1944. Note the knighting-stool.

The accolade (also known as dubbing or adoubement) (benedictio militis) was the central act in the rite of passage ceremonies conferring knighthood in the Middle Ages.

Depiction of Chinese swordsman wielding a single-edged sword, from the Dan Dao Fa Xuan, c. 1626

Swordsmanship

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Swordsmanship or sword fighting refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword.

Swordsmanship or sword fighting refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword.

Depiction of Chinese swordsman wielding a single-edged sword, from the Dan Dao Fa Xuan, c. 1626
Roman gladius
The MS I.33 manuscript, dated to ca. 1290, shows fencing with the arming sword and the buckler.
Sabre duel of German students, around 1900, painting by Georg Mühlberg (1863–1925)
1763 fencing print from Domenico Angelo's instruction book. Angelo was instrumental in turning fencing into an athletic sport.
Advertisement for Alfred Hutton's swordsmanship show at the Bath Club.
Sherden guards with double-edge swords
A Chinese dao and scabbard of the 18th century
Kendo at an agricultural school in Japan around 1920
An excerpt from the Muyedobotongji: mounted double-sword (마상쌍검; 馬上雙劍)
Filipino soldiers armed with bolos
Angampora exponents with swords and bucklers.

As time passed, the spatha evolved into the arming sword, a weapon with a notable cruciform hilt common among knights in the Medieval Age.

Zulu chief Goza and two of his councillors in war-dress, all with Nguni shields, c.1870. The size of the shield on the chief's left arm denotes his status, and the white colour that he is a married man.

Shield

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Piece of personal armour held in the hand, which may or may not be strapped to the wrist or forearm.

Piece of personal armour held in the hand, which may or may not be strapped to the wrist or forearm.

Zulu chief Goza and two of his councillors in war-dress, all with Nguni shields, c.1870. The size of the shield on the chief's left arm denotes his status, and the white colour that he is a married man.
Wall painting depicting a Mycenaean Greek "figure eight" shield with a suspension strap at the middle, 15th century BC, National Archaeological Museum, Athens -The faces of figure eight shields were quite convex. The cited "strap" may be the ridge on the front (so denoted by the visible pattern of the ox hide) of the shield.
Elaborate and sophisticated shields from the Philippines.
Greek soldiers of Greco-Persian Wars. Left: Greek slinger. Right: hoplites. Middle: hoplite's shield has a curtain which serves as a protection from arrows.
Two wooden round shields survived at Thorsberg moor
Ballistic shield, NIJ Level IIIA
U.S. Navy Special Warfare Combatant-craft Crewmen (SWCC) fire a shield-equipped Minigun
Image from Hatshepsut's expedition to Punt showing Egyptians soldiers with shields (wood/animal skin). 15th century BC. Temple of Hathor Deir el-Bahari
A hoplite by painter Alkimachos, on an Attic red-figure vase, c. 460 BC. Shield has a curtain which serves as a protection from arrows.
Sword and buckler (small shield) combat, plate from the Tacuinum Sanitatis illustrated in Lombardy, ca. 1390.
Drawing from the Codex Manesse showing jousting knights on horseback carrying shields.
Ceremonial shield with mosaic decoration. Aztec or Mixtec, AD 1400-1521 (British Museum).
Australian Aboriginal shield, Royal Albert Memorial Museum.
Nias ceremonial shield.
Hippopotamus Hide Shield from Sudan. Currently housed at Westminster College in New Wilmington, Pennsylvania.
Aboriginal bark shield collected in Botany Bay, New South Wales, during Captain Cook's first voyage in 1770 (British Museum)
Three-lion symbolic shield (under the helmet) in the coat of arms of Tallinn.

As body armour improved, knight's shields became smaller, leading to the familiar heater shield style.

In 1434 on this spot—the bridge over the river Órbigo—Suero de Quiñones and ten of his knights challenged all comers to a pas d'armes, promising to "break 300 lances" before moving on.

Pas d'armes

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Type of chivalric hastilude that evolved in the late 14th century and remained popular through the 15th century.

Type of chivalric hastilude that evolved in the late 14th century and remained popular through the 15th century.

In 1434 on this spot—the bridge over the river Órbigo—Suero de Quiñones and ten of his knights challenged all comers to a pas d'armes, promising to "break 300 lances" before moving on.

It involved a knight or group of knights (tenans or "holders") who would stake out a traveled spot, such as a bridge or city gate, and let it be known that any other knight who wished to pass (venans or "comers") must first fight, or be disgraced.