A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Ritter

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Ritter (German for "knight") is a designation used as a title of nobility in German-speaking areas.

Penguilly l'Haridon: Le Combat des Trente

Combat of the Thirty

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Episode in the Breton War of Succession fought to determine who would rule the Duchy of Brittany.

Episode in the Breton War of Succession fought to determine who would rule the Duchy of Brittany.

Penguilly l'Haridon: Le Combat des Trente
Banner attributed to Breton and French knights at the Combat of the Thirty in 1351, during the Breton civil war
Beaumanoir's knights kneel in prayer before battle. Illustration by J. E. Millais to Tom Taylor's translation of a Breton language ballad in Barzaz Breiz
Combat des Trente: an illumination in the Compillation des cronicques et ystoires des Bretons (1480), of Pierre Le Baud. The two strongholds of Ploërmel and Josselin are fancifully depicted within sight of each other.
According to P.Rault show the Franco-Bretons knights wearing tunics with a black cross while the Anglo-Bretons knights wearing tunics with a red cross.

It was an arranged fight between selected combatants from both sides of the conflict, fought at a site midway between the Breton castles of Josselin and Ploërmel among 30 champions, knights, and squires on each side.

Various Eastern maces, from left: Bozdogan/buzdygan (Ottoman), tabar-shishpar (Indian), shishpar (Indian), shishpar (unknown), gurz (Indian), shishpar (Indian).

Mace (bludgeon)

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Blunt weapon, a type of club or virge that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful strikes.

Blunt weapon, a type of club or virge that uses a heavy head on the end of a handle to deliver powerful strikes.

Various Eastern maces, from left: Bozdogan/buzdygan (Ottoman), tabar-shishpar (Indian), shishpar (Indian), shishpar (unknown), gurz (Indian), shishpar (Indian).
A mural of Bhima with his mace
A prehistoric earthenware mace found in central Serbia
Moche stone maces. Larco Museum Collection (Lima-Peru)
Calcite mace head, 7-6th millennium BC, Syria
Assyrian soldier holding a mace and a bow. Detail of a basalt relief from the palace of Tiglath-pileser III at Hadatu, Syria. 744–727 BCE. Ancient Orient Museum, Istanbul
Pernach (left) and two shestopyors
Shestopyor-type mace (in literal translation six-feathers) used by the rotmistrzs of the private army of the Radziwiłł family.
Mace polearm wielding figurine from the tomb of Ming dynasty prince Zhu Tan, 10th son of the Hongwu Emperor
World War I trench raiding club
Mace of the Royal Society, granted by Charles II
Marshal of Poland mace
Ceremonial maces of the Rector Magnificus of the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, Philippines.
Indian shishpar (flanged mace), all steel construction, with eight knife edged, hinged flanges, 18th-19th century, 26 inches long.
Indian shishpar (flanged mace), steel with solid shaft and eight flanged head, 24in.
Indian (Deccan) tabar-shishpar, an extremely rare combination tabar axe and shishpar eight flanged mace, steel with hollow shaft, 21.75 in. 17th to 18th century.

For a heavily armed Persian knight, a mace was as effective as a sword or battle axe.

Order of St. George (Habsburg-Lorraine)

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The Order of St. George – a European Order of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (St.

The Order of St. George – a European Order of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (St.

Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg
Emperor Charles I of Austria, King of Hungary (as Charles IV, Hungarian: IV. Károly), King of Bohemia.

Vinzenz Stimpfl-Abele, procurator of the Order, goes back to Bernhard von Clairvaux to consider the importance of the Order and the knights in the 21st century.

Book of Chivalry

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The Book of Chivalry (French: Livre de chevalerie) was written by the knight Geoffroi de Charny (c.1306-1356) sometime around the early 1350s.

WWII model of the Waffenrock

Waffenrock

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WWII model of the Waffenrock
<center>Alexander Nevsky in {{lang|de|Waffenrock}} with suit of armor and sword</center>
<center>Saint George in suit of armor, with tunic ({{lang-de|Waffenrock}}) and lance</center>
<center>Knight in suit of armor and {{lang|de|Waffenrock}}, preparing to battle</center>
<center>Fighting knights in suit of armor and {{lang|de|Waffenrock}}</center>
<center>Tourney in suit of armor and {{lang|de|Waffenrock}} (16th or 17th century)</center>
<center>Frederick II of Prussia in {{lang|de|Waffenrock}} (dress tunic)</center>
<center>{{lang|de|Waffenrock k.u.k. 94th InfRgt, Stabsfeldwebel}} in white egalisation colour</center>
<center>{{lang|de|Waffenrock k.u.k.}} colonel of the engineer corps in steel-green egalisation colour</center>
<center>{{lang|de|Waffenrock}} of a customs inspector in Hamburg 1888-1919</center>
<center>{{lang|de|Waffenrock Hauptmann}} of the {{lang|de|i=unset|Wehrmacht}} ca. 1939</center>

Waffenrock ([also Waffenkleid] surcoat or tunic) was originally a medieval German term for an outer garment, worn by knights over their armor.

Historical reenactment of a Sassanid-era cataphract, complete with a full set of scale armor for the horse. The rider is covered by extensive mail armor.

Cataphract

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Form of armored heavy cavalryman that originated in Persia and was fielded in ancient warfare throughout Eurasia and Northern Africa.

Form of armored heavy cavalryman that originated in Persia and was fielded in ancient warfare throughout Eurasia and Northern Africa.

Historical reenactment of a Sassanid-era cataphract, complete with a full set of scale armor for the horse. The rider is covered by extensive mail armor.
Sculpture of a Sasanian cataphract in Taq-e Bostan, Iran. It is One of the oldest depictions of a cataphract.
The extent circa 170 BC of the Iranian Scythians and Parthians, to whom the first recorded use of true cataphract-like cavalry can be attributed in antiquity.
Chanfron, Northern Yan
A stone-etched relief depicting a Parthian cataphract fighting against a lion. Housed in the British Museum.
Three examples of the various styles of interweaving and wire threading that were commonly employed in the creation of cataphract scale armor to form a stiffened, "armored shell" with which to protect the horse.
Breakdown of a fully armoured Chinese cataphract
Equestrian relief at Firuzabad, Iran showing Cataphracts dueling with lances
The cataphract-style parade armor of a Saka (Scythian) royal from the Issyk kurgan, dubbed "Golden Man". The overlapping golden scales are typical of cataphract armor.
Two heavily armored noblemen dueling on horseback with kontos; Sasanian era silver plate with gold coating, Azerbaijan Museum, Tabriz, Iran
A depiction of Sarmatian cataphracts fleeing from Roman cavalry during the Dacian wars circa 101 AD, at Trajan's Column in Rome

Chronicled by many historians from the earliest days of antiquity up until the High Middle Ages, they may have influenced the later European knights, through contact with the Byzantine Empire.

Rahinnane Castle, residence of the Knights from c. 1500 to c. 1650

Knight of Kerry

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Rahinnane Castle, residence of the Knights from c. 1500 to c. 1650

Knight of Kerry (Ridire Chiarraí ), also called The Green Knight, is one of three Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthoods, all of which existed in Ireland since feudal times.

Civil Knight Grand Cross Star of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath

Order of the Bath

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British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725.

British order of chivalry founded by George I on 18 May 1725.

Civil Knight Grand Cross Star of The Most Honourable Order of the Bath
Coat of arms of the British monarch as sovereign of the Order of the Bath
Mildmay Fane, 2nd Earl of Westmorland, KB, with sash, c.1630.
Sir Robert Walpole, the first Prime Minister, who used the Order of the Bath as a source of political patronage
Admiral Lord Rodney (appointed a Knight Companion in 1780) wearing the riband and star of the Order
Admiral of the Fleet Sir George Callaghan wearing the insignia of a military Companion of the Order
Sir Alexander Milne (1808–1896) was concurrently KCB (civil division) and GCB (military division); he is pictured wearing both sets of insignia.
Air Chief Marshal Sir Richard Johns in his dress uniform, wearing the star, ribbon, and badge of a military Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath.
Prince Albert, the Prince Consort, Great Master 1843–1861. During the 19th century, Knights Grand Cross wore their mantles over imitations of 17th-century dress. They now wear them over contemporary attire.
Sash and star of Grand Cross, civil division
Admiral Sir George Zambellas KCB (military division)
An embroidered representation, or "chaton", of the star of the civil division of the Order
The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the civil division of the order
Mantle of the Order
The insignia of a Knight Grand Cross of the military division of the order
Star and neck badge of a Knight Commander of the civil division of the order
Westminster Abbey with a procession of Knights of the Bath, by Canaletto, 1749
Coat of arms of the Marquess of Carisbrooke (1886–1960) with the circlet and collar as Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Coat of arms of the Air Chief Marshal Sir Peter Squire, Knight Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath
Star, Knight Grand Cross Military Division
Neck badge, awarded to Cecil Fane de Salis (1859-1948) in 1935
Star, awarded to Cecil Fane de Salis
Star and neck Badge awarded to Sir Charles Taylor du Plat
Medal Ribbon of the Order of the Bath
Banners of the senior Knights and Dames Grand Cross of the Order of the Bath in the Henry VII Lady Chapel in Westminster Abbey

The name derives from the elaborate medieval ceremony for appointing a knight, which involved bathing (as a symbol of purification) as one of its elements.

Thomas Malory

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Sir Thomas Malory (c.

Sir Thomas Malory (c.

He was knighted before 8 October 1441, became a professional soldier, and served under Henry Beauchamp, 1st Duke of Warwick—but all dates are vague, and it is not known how he became distinguished.