A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Homage in the Middle Ages

Homage (feudal)

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The ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

The ceremony in which a feudal tenant or vassal pledged reverence and submission to his feudal lord, receiving in exchange the symbolic title to his new position (investiture).

Homage in the Middle Ages

The implication was that no "knights service" was owed for the English lands.

Edmund FitzGibbon

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Edmund Fitzgibbon, 11th White Knight (c.

Edmund Fitzgibbon, 11th White Knight (c.

1552 – 23 April 1608), was an Irish nobleman of the FitzGerald dynasty, who held a Hiberno-Norman hereditary knighthood.

Heraldic crown of Edler, with five visible pearls

Edler

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Heraldic crown of Edler, with five visible pearls

Edler was until 1919 the lowest rank of nobility in Austria-Hungary and Germany, just beneath a Ritter (hereditary knight), but above untitled nobles, who used only the nobiliary particle von before their surname.

A 20th-century English herald's tabard

Tabard

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Type of short coat that was commonly worn by men during the late Middle Ages and early modern period in Europe.

Type of short coat that was commonly worn by men during the late Middle Ages and early modern period in Europe.

A 20th-century English herald's tabard
The Waterseller of Seville by Diego Velázquez, c.1620, depicting a functional workman's tabard
Thomas Hawley, Clarenceux King of Arms, depicted in his tabard on a grant of arms of 1556
Gelre Herald to the Duke of Guelders, c.1380
James I, King of Scotland 1406–1437, and his wife Joan Beaufort
Tabards displaying quartered coats of arms on front and sleeves: the Denys brass of 1505, Olveston, Gloucestershire
Heraldic tabards worn at the funeral of Albert VII, Archduke of Austria, in Brussels in 1622
A pursuivant wearing his tabard "athwart". A drawing by Peter Lely from the 1660s.
St John the Baptist Wearing the Red Tabard of the Order of St John (1671) by Mattia Preti
Peter O'Donoghue, Bluemantle Pursuivant, photographed in 2006
A modern protective tabard worn by a bakery worker
Orange high-visibility tabards worn by competitive motorcyclists

By the second half of the 15th century, tabards, now open at the sides and so usually belted, were also being worn by knights in military contexts over their armour, and were usually emblazoned with their arms (though sometimes worn plain).

Sigismund fees the Margraviate of Brandenburg to Frederick, April 30, 1415

Fief

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The central element of feudalism.

The central element of feudalism.

Sigismund fees the Margraviate of Brandenburg to Frederick, April 30, 1415

In 13th-century Germany, Italy, England, France, and Spain the term "feodum" was used to describe a dependent tenure held from a lord by a vassal in return for a specified amount of knight service and occasional financial payments (feudal incidents).

heraldic coronet of a Ridder.

Ridder (title)

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heraldic coronet of a Ridder.

Ridder (English: "Knight") is a noble title in Belgium, Denmark and the Netherlands.

A goshawk

Falconry

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Hunting of wild animals in their natural state and habitat by means of a trained bird of prey.

Hunting of wild animals in their natural state and habitat by means of a trained bird of prey.

A goshawk
Flying a saker falcon
Detail of two falconers from
Indian king, Maharaja Suraj Mal of Bharatpur with a hawk
Mughal emperor Akbar with a hawk
The medieval poet Konrad von Altstetten shown with his falcon, in the embrace of his lover. From the Codex Manesse.
Three panels depicting hawking in England from various time periods, as reprinted in Joseph Strutt's 1801 book, The Sports and Pastimes of the People of England from the Earliest Period: The middle panel is from a Saxon manuscript dated to the late 10th century – early 11th century, as of 1801 held in the "Cotton Library", showing a Saxon nobleman and his falconer. The top and bottom panels are drawings from a manuscript held, as of 1801, in the Royal Library, dating from the early 14th century, showing parties of both sexes hawking by the waterside; the falconer is frightening the fowl to make them rise and the hawk is in the act of seizing upon one of them.
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Icelandic gyrfalcon, 1759, Livrustkammaren
A couple belonging to the Sambal warrior class, documented by the 16th-century Boxer Codex: The female warrior is holding a raptor, which has captured a bird, exemplifying a culture of falconry.
A lady with peregrine falcon on horse
A falconer's red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Harris's hawk used in falconry
Falconer with a Harris's hawk
A lanner falcon with its lure
A barn owl landing on a falconer's hand
A Mongolian man inspects his golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) before competing in an eagle hunting contest in northern Mongolia
A brown falcon used for falconry in Tasmania
A saker falcon used for falconry in Qatar
A hobby
Falconer from Al Ain, Abu Dhabi
Falconry equipment
The Shaw Monument, a falconry observation tower in Scotland.
A white gyrfalcon
Falconry
A falconer from Saudi Arabia, 1970s.

7) Knight: sacre and the sacret

Imperial, royal and noble ranks

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Rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Rooted in Late Antiquity and the Middle Ages.

Knight is the central rank of the Medieval aristocratic system in Europe (and having its equivalents elsewhere), usually ranking at or near the top of the Minor Nobility

Order (distinction)

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Visible honour awarded by a sovereign state, monarch, dynastic house or organisation to a person, typically in recognition of individual merit, that often comes with distinctive insignia such as collars, medals, badges, and sashes worn by recipients.

Visible honour awarded by a sovereign state, monarch, dynastic house or organisation to a person, typically in recognition of individual merit, that often comes with distinctive insignia such as collars, medals, badges, and sashes worn by recipients.

Orders often come in multiple classes, including knights and dames in imitation of the original chivalric orders.

A museum display of a sixteenth-century knight with a horse in full barding

Barding

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Body armour for war horses.

Body armour for war horses.

A museum display of a sixteenth-century knight with a horse in full barding
Chinese Song dynasty lamellar horse barding as illustrated on Wujing Zongyao
Chanfron, Gaya confederacy
A chanfron made in Italy in the early 16th century
A set of armour with a criniere (protecting neck), peytral (protecting chest) and the croupiere (protecting hind quarters). Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna, Austria.
Peytral with decorative openings, early 16th century, Germany
This 15th-century depiction of a tournament shows fully caparisoned horses, from Le Livre des tournois by Barthélemy d'Eyck.

Though its historical roots lie in antiquity in the regions of what was once the Persian Empire, barded horses have become a symbol of the late European Middle Ages chivalry and the era of knights.