Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

109 related topics

Alpha

Illustration of a horse's "good points", 13th century manuscript of the Kitāb al-bayṭara by Aḥmad ibn ʿAtīq al-Azdī.

Furusiyya

Historical Arabic term for equestrian martial exercise.

Historical Arabic term for equestrian martial exercise.

Illustration of a horse's "good points", 13th century manuscript of the Kitāb al-bayṭara by Aḥmad ibn ʿAtīq al-Azdī.
Late Mamluk / early Ottoman Egyptian horse armour (Egypt, c. 1550; Musée de l'Armée).
Late Mamluk-era manuscript on training with the lance (The David Collection Inv. nr. 19/2001, c. 1500).
Faris, by January Suchodolski (1836).
Illustration from an Ottoman copy of Tuhfat ül-farisin fi ahval-i huyul il-mucahidin by Ahmed 'Ata Tayyarzade

The term fāris (فارس) for "horseman" consequently adopted qualities comparable to the Western knight or chevalier ("cavalier").

Order of St. George (Habsburg-Lorraine)

The Order of St. George – a European Order of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (St.

The Order of St. George – a European Order of the House of Habsburg-Lorraine (St.

Emperor Maximilian of Habsburg
Emperor Charles I of Austria, King of Hungary (as Charles IV, Hungarian: IV. Károly), King of Bohemia.

Vinzenz Stimpfl-Abele, procurator of the Order, goes back to Bernhard von Clairvaux to consider the importance of the Order and the knights in the 21st century.

Statue of El Cid in Burgos, Spain

El Cid

Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (c.

Rodrigo Díaz de Vivar (c.

Statue of El Cid in Burgos, Spain
Here on the penultimate and final line of the document's text appears the autograph of Rodrigo Díaz: «ego ruderico, simul cum coniuge mea, afirmo oc quod superius scriptum est.» This translates as "I Rodrigo, together with my wife, affirm that which is written above."
First paragraph of the Carmen Campidoctoris, the earliest literary treatment of El Cid's life, written to celebrate El Cid's defeat of some counts and champions
Marcos Giráldez de Acosta painting (1864) depicting the "Santa Gadea Oath". In the middle of the scene, Alfonso VI (with red cape) is swearing with his right hand on the Bible that he did not take part in the murder of his brother Sancho II, while El Cid stands as a witness in front of him.
During his service to the Taifa of Zaragoza, he had gained a prominent reputation and the title El Cid (the Lord). He is also known to have developed links with the other Taifas in 1080.
Detail of the Aljaferia palace, in the Taifa of Zaragoza
El Cid ordering the execution of Almoravid allies after his conquest of Valencia in 1094
Battle of Quart de Poblet (21 October 1094). El Cid's troops are in green, Almoravid troops are in red.
Tomb of El Cid and his wife Doña Jimena at the Burgos Cathedral
Tomb of Babieca at the monastery of San Pedro de Cardeña
El Cid depicted on the title page of a 16th-century working of his story
General view of the 1954 Juan Cristóbal González Quesada's statue of El Cid in Burgos
Another copy of Huntington's El Cid statue in Buenos Aires
Statue of El Cid included in the 14th- to 15th-century "Santa María" gateway, Burgos
1344 medieval miniature showing the decapitation of Count Lozano by El Cid
Burgalese traditional representation (called "Gigantones") of El Cid that is taken to the streets during the town major festivity. Doña Jimena's representation is behind.
The terrain known as the "Solar del Cid", where his house was located. The monument was erected in 1784. Photo taken in Burgos, ca. 1865–1892.
El Cid depiction on the book Portraits of illustrious Spaniards (1791)
In 2008, this El Cid statue made by Ángel Gil Cuevas was placed in Mecerreyes, at the path of the "Camino del Cid".
Another version of the "Santa Gadea Oath", painted by Armando Menocal in 1889
El Cid's chest at Burgos Cathedral
El Cid portrait from The Historians' History of the World
El Cid medallion (1733–34) at the Plaza Mayor, Salamanca
1864 Juan Vicens Cots painting "La Primera hazaña de El Cid" depicts a young Rodrigo Díaz showing his father Diego Laínez the severed head of Count Lozano, the father of his future wife Doña Jimena. Count Lozano had previously mocked and slapped elderly Diego Laínez.

Andalusi Knights found El Cid their foe ill, thirsty and exiled from the court of Alfonso, he was presented before the elderly Yusuf al-Mu'taman ibn Hud and accepted command of the forces of the Taifa of Zaragoza as their Master.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591

Francis Drake

Sir Francis Drake (c.

Sir Francis Drake (c.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591
Portrait miniature by Nicholas Hilliard, 1581, reverse of "Drake Jewel", inscribed Aetatis suae 42, An(n)o D(omi)ni 1581 ("42 years of his age, 1581 AD")
A map of Drake's route around the world. The northern limit of Drake's exploration of the Pacific coast of North America is still in dispute. Drake's Bay is south of Cape Mendocino.
A replica of the Golden Hind at Bankside in London
Drake's landing in California, engraving published 1590 by Theodor de Bry
Drake viewing treasure taken from a Spanish ship, print courtesy New York Public Library
The "Drake Jewel" as painted by Gheeraerts the Younger in a 1591 portrait of Drake
Buckland Abbey in Devon
Map of Drake's Great Expedition in 1585 by Giovanni Battista Boazio
Drake's burial at sea off Portobello. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock.
Arms of Sir Francis Drake: Sable, a fess wavy between two pole-stars Arctic and Antarctic argent
Arms of Drake of Ash: Argent, a wyvern wings displayed and tail nowed gules.<ref name="Vivian 1895, p.292">Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p. 292, pedigree of Drake of Ash</ref> The Drake family of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey used the same arms but the tail of the wyvern is not nowed (knotted)<ref name="Vivian p.299">Vivian, p.299, pedigree of Drake of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey</ref>
Sir Francis Drake with his new heraldic achievement, with motto: Sic Parvis Magna, translated literally: "Thus great things from small things (come)". The hand out of the clouds is labelled Auxilio Divino, or "With Divine Help"<ref name=NationalTrust>{{cite web |url=http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |title=Image details |publisher=National Trust Images |access-date=25 October 2012 |archive-date=3 September 2012 |archive-url=https://archive.today/20120903192626/http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |url-status=live }}</ref>
Sir Francis Drake whilst playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe is informed of the approach of the Spanish Armada. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock
Eighteenth century portrait of the Spanish Armada by Philip James de Loutherbourg
Drake taking the surrender of Admiral Pedro de Valdés on the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora del Rosario
This portrait, circa 1581, may have been copied from Hilliard's [[:Image:Sfdrake42.jpg|miniature]]—note the similar shirt—and the somewhat oddly-proportioned body, added by an artist who did not have access to Drake. National Portrait Gallery, London.
Bronze statue in Tavistock, in the parish of which he was born, by Joseph Boehm, 1883.
Drake Jewel, on loan at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Elizabeth I awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581 which he received on the Golden Hind in Deptford.

The first page of Knight's Tale in the Ellesmere manuscript

The Knight's Tale

First tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

First tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The first page of Knight's Tale in the Ellesmere manuscript

Two cousins and knights, Palamon and Arcite, are captured and imprisoned by Theseus, duke of Athens, after being found unconscious following his battle against Creon.

Portrait from c. late 17th–18th century

William Wallace

Portrait from c. late 17th–18th century
Personal seal of Sir William Wallace, found on a letter written on 11 October 1297, to the mayor of Lübeck, Germany.
Statue of Wallace at Edinburgh Castle
Wallace statue by D. W. Stevenson on the Scottish National Portrait Gallery, Edinburgh
The later Stirling Bridge
William Wallace Statue, Aberdeen
Wallace's trial in Westminster Hall. Painting by Daniel Maclise
Plaque marking the place of Wallace's execution

Sir William Wallace (Uilleam Uallas, ; Norman French: William le Waleys; c. 127023 August 1305) was a Scottish knight who became one of the main leaders during the First War of Scottish Independence.

1436 fresco depicting Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello, Duomo, Florence. With Renaissance grotto-esque candelabra decorated frame added by Lorenzo di Credi in 1524. The Latin inscription reads: Ioannes Acutus eques brittanicus dux aetatis suae cautissimus et rei militaris peritissimus habitus est ("John Hawkwood, British knight, most prudent leader of his age and most expert in the art of war").

John Hawkwood

English soldier who served as a mercenary leader or condottiero in Italy.

English soldier who served as a mercenary leader or condottiero in Italy.

1436 fresco depicting Sir John Hawkwood by Paolo Uccello, Duomo, Florence. With Renaissance grotto-esque candelabra decorated frame added by Lorenzo di Credi in 1524. The Latin inscription reads: Ioannes Acutus eques brittanicus dux aetatis suae cautissimus et rei militaris peritissimus habitus est ("John Hawkwood, British knight, most prudent leader of his age and most expert in the art of war").
Engraving based on fresco of John Hawkwood
Arms of Hawkwood: Argent, on a chevron sable three escallops of the field, as seen on his fresco in the Duomo, Florence

Although Hawkwood was knighted, there is no clear evidence by whom or where.

A 20th-century English herald's tabard

Tabard

Type of short coat that was commonly worn by men during the late Middle Ages and early modern period in Europe.

Type of short coat that was commonly worn by men during the late Middle Ages and early modern period in Europe.

A 20th-century English herald's tabard
The Waterseller of Seville by Diego Velázquez, c.1620, depicting a functional workman's tabard
Thomas Hawley, Clarenceux King of Arms, depicted in his tabard on a grant of arms of 1556
Gelre Herald to the Duke of Guelders, c.1380
James I, King of Scotland 1406–1437, and his wife Joan Beaufort
Tabards displaying quartered coats of arms on front and sleeves: the Denys brass of 1505, Olveston, Gloucestershire
Heraldic tabards worn at the funeral of Albert VII, Archduke of Austria, in Brussels in 1622
A pursuivant wearing his tabard "athwart". A drawing by Peter Lely from the 1660s.
St John the Baptist Wearing the Red Tabard of the Order of St John (1671) by Mattia Preti
Peter O'Donoghue, Bluemantle Pursuivant, photographed in 2006
A modern protective tabard worn by a bakery worker
Orange high-visibility tabards worn by competitive motorcyclists

By the second half of the 15th century, tabards, now open at the sides and so usually belted, were also being worn by knights in military contexts over their armour, and were usually emblazoned with their arms (though sometimes worn plain).

Georg von Trapp

Officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who later became the patriarch of the Trapp Family Singers.

Officer in the Austro-Hungarian Navy who later became the patriarch of the Trapp Family Singers.

On duty aboard SM U-5
Lieutenant Georg Ritter von Trapp and Agathe Whitehead about 1910
The two eldest Trapp sons, Rupert (right) and Werner, in U.S. Army uniforms, reading sheet music on 24 January 1946

Trapp married Agathe Gobertina Whitehead, the first daughter and third child of Countess Agathe Gobertina von Breunner-Enckevoirth (1856–1945), Austro-Hungarian nobility, and Cavaliere (Knight) John Whitehead (1854-1902), son of Robert Whitehead (1823–1905) who invented the modern torpedo and a partner at the family's Fiume Whitehead Torpedo Factory (not, as frequently stated, a niece of the British Government minister St. John Brodrick).

In 1434 on this spot—the bridge over the river Órbigo—Suero de Quiñones and ten of his knights challenged all comers to a pas d'armes, promising to "break 300 lances" before moving on.

Pas d'armes

Type of chivalric hastilude that evolved in the late 14th century and remained popular through the 15th century.

Type of chivalric hastilude that evolved in the late 14th century and remained popular through the 15th century.

In 1434 on this spot—the bridge over the river Órbigo—Suero de Quiñones and ten of his knights challenged all comers to a pas d'armes, promising to "break 300 lances" before moving on.

It involved a knight or group of knights (tenans or "holders") who would stake out a traveled spot, such as a bridge or city gate, and let it be known that any other knight who wished to pass (venans or "comers") must first fight, or be disgraced.