A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Possible tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London

William Marshal, 1st Earl of Pembroke

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Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.

Anglo-Norman soldier and statesman.

Possible tomb effigy of William Marshal in Temple Church, London
Château de Tancarville in Normandy, where William Marshal began his training as a knight
Memorial in Cartmel Priory
A 13th-century depiction of the Second Battle of Lincoln, which occurred at Lincoln Castle on 20 May 1217; the illustration shows the death of Thomas du Perche, the Comte de la Perche
Inverted shield of William the Marshal (the incomparable knight) with obituary and epitaph portrayed by Matthew Paris
William Marshal was interred in Temple Church, London
Arms of William Marshal

Knighted in 1166, he spent his younger years as a knight errant and a successful tournament competitor; Stephen Langton eulogised him as the "best knight that ever lived."

A denarius of Charlemagne dated 812–814 with the inscription  (Karolus Imperator Augustus)

Charlemagne

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King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and the first Holy Roman Emperor from 800.

King of the Franks from 768, King of the Lombards from 774, and the first Holy Roman Emperor from 800.

A denarius of Charlemagne dated 812–814 with the inscription  (Karolus Imperator Augustus)
The Bust of Charlemagne, an idealised portrayal and reliquary said to contain Charlemagne's skull cap, is located at Aachen Cathedral Treasury, and can be regarded as the most famous depiction of the ruler.
Roman road connecting Tongeren to the Herstal region. Jupille and Herstal, near Liege, are located in the lower right corner
Moorish Hispania in 732
Charlemagne (left) and Pepin the Hunchback (10th-century copy of 9th-century original)
Charlemagne instructing his son Louis the Pious
The Frankish king Charlemagne was a devout Catholic and maintained a close relationship with the papacy throughout his life. In 772, when Pope Adrian I was threatened by invaders, the king rushed to Rome to provide assistance. Shown here, the pope asks Charlemagne for help at a meeting near Rome.
Harun al-Rashid receiving a delegation of Charlemagne in Baghdad, by Julius Köckert (1864)
Charlemagne's additions to the Frankish Kingdom
Charlemagne receiving the submission of Widukind at Paderborn in 785, painted c. 1840 by Ary Scheffer
Equestrian statue of Charlemagne by Agostino Cornacchini (1725), St. Peter's Basilica, Vatican City.
Imperial Coronation of Charlemagne, by Friedrich Kaulbach, 1861
Pope Leo III, crowning Charlemagne from Chroniques de France ou de Saint Denis, vol. 1; France, second quarter of 14th century.
The Throne of Charlemagne and the subsequent German Kings in Aachen Cathedral, Germany
Coronation of Charlemagne, drawing by Julius Schnorr von Karolsfeld
Coronation of an idealised king, depicted in the Sacramentary of Charles the Bald (about 870)
The Coronation of Charlemagne, by assistants of Raphael, c. 1516–1517
Europe at the death of the Charlemagne 814.
Proserpina sarcophagus of Charlemagne in the Aachen Cathedral Treasury
A portion of the 814 death shroud of Charlemagne. It represents a quadriga and was manufactured in Constantinople. Musée de Cluny, Paris.
Frederick II's gold and silver casket for Charlemagne, the Karlsschrein
Monogram of Charlemagne, including signum manus, from the subscription of a royal diploma: Signum (monogr.: KAROLVS) Karoli gloriosissimi regis
Denier from the era of Charlemagne, Tours, 793–812
Charlemagne in a contemporary sketch
The privileges of Charlemagne at the Modena Cathedral (containing the monogram of Charlemagne), dated 782
Charlemagne's chapel at Aachen Cathedral
Page from the Lorsch Gospels of Charlemagne's reign
13th-century stained glass depiction of Charlemagne, Strasbourg Cathedral
The Carolingian-era equestrian statuette thought to represent Charlemagne (from Metz Cathedral, now in the Louvre)
Later depiction of Charlemagne in the Bibliothèque Nationale de France
One of a chain of Middle Welsh legends about Charlemagne: Ystorya de Carolo Magno from the Red Book of Hergest (Jesus College, Oxford, MS 111), 14th century
Emperor Charlemagne, by Albrecht Dürer, 1511–1513, Germanisches Nationalmuseum

Charlemagne was a model knight as one of the Nine Worthies who enjoyed an important legacy in European culture.

Monarchy of the United Kingdom

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Constitutional form of government by which a hereditary sovereign reigns as the head of state of the United Kingdom, the Crown Dependencies and the British Overseas Territories.

Constitutional form of government by which a hereditary sovereign reigns as the head of state of the United Kingdom, the Crown Dependencies and the British Overseas Territories.

The English Bill of Rights of 1689 curtailed the sovereign's governmental power.
The Bayeux Tapestry depicts the Norman Conquest of 1066.
In 1603 James VI and I became the first monarch to rule over England, Scotland, and Ireland together.
England and Scotland were united as the Kingdom of Great Britain under Queen Anne in 1707.
The union of Great Britain and Ireland into the United Kingdom occurred in 1801 during the reign of King George III.
Map of the British Empire in 1921
Charles, Prince of Wales, heir apparent to the British throne
Buckingham Palace, the monarch's principal residence
Holyrood Palace, the monarch's official Scottish residence
The coat of arms of Elizabeth II in the United Kingdom. The design, in use since the accession of Queen Victoria in 1837, features the arms of England in the first and fourth quarters, Scotland in the second, and Ireland in the third. In Scotland a separate version is used (shown right) whereby the Arms of Scotland take precedence.

The Crown creates all peerages, appoints members of the orders of chivalry, grants knighthoods and awards other honours.

Illustration of a horse's "good points", 13th century manuscript of the Kitāb al-bayṭara by Aḥmad ibn ʿAtīq al-Azdī.

Furusiyya

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Historical Arabic term for equestrian martial exercise.

Historical Arabic term for equestrian martial exercise.

Illustration of a horse's "good points", 13th century manuscript of the Kitāb al-bayṭara by Aḥmad ibn ʿAtīq al-Azdī.
Late Mamluk / early Ottoman Egyptian horse armour (Egypt, c. 1550; Musée de l'Armée).
Late Mamluk-era manuscript on training with the lance (The David Collection Inv. nr. 19/2001, c. 1500).
Faris, by January Suchodolski (1836).
Illustration from an Ottoman copy of Tuhfat ül-farisin fi ahval-i huyul il-mucahidin by Ahmed 'Ata Tayyarzade

The term fāris (فارس) for "horseman" consequently adopted qualities comparable to the Western knight or chevalier ("cavalier").

Cuirass worn by a Carabinier-à-Cheval

Cuirass

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Piece of armour that is formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the torso.

Piece of armour that is formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the torso.

Cuirass worn by a Carabinier-à-Cheval
An Ancient Greek bronze cuirass, dated	between 620 and 580 BC
Indian steel cuirass, 17th to 18th century
M1872 helmet and M1855 cuirass worn by the French Cuirassiers
German helmet and frontal armoured plate for trench warfare, 1916
Japanese cuirass (dō) from the 1600s made from individual large scales (hon iyozane)

The latter portion of the 14th century saw the cuirass gradually come into general use in connection with plate armour for the limbs until, at the close of the century, mail was phased out among the nobles (e.g., knights) except in the camail of the bascinet and at the edge of the hauberk.

Mr and Mrs Andrews (c. 1750) by Thomas Gainsborough, a couple from the landed gentry, a marriage alliance between two local landowning families – one gentry, one trade. National Gallery, London.

Landed gentry

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Largely historical British social class of landowners who could live entirely from rental income, or at least had a country estate.

Largely historical British social class of landowners who could live entirely from rental income, or at least had a country estate.

Mr and Mrs Andrews (c. 1750) by Thomas Gainsborough, a couple from the landed gentry, a marriage alliance between two local landowning families – one gentry, one trade. National Gallery, London.
Typical entry in Burke's Landed Gentry (from Volume 2 of the 1898 edition).

2) Knights: originally a military rank, this status was increasingly awarded to civilians as a reward for service to the Crown. Holders have the right to be addressed as Sir, as are baronets, but unlike baronet, the title of knight is not hereditary.

Josef Graf Radetzky wearing the Grand Cross's star and the sash of the Military Order of Maria Theresa

Grand Cross

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Highest class in many orders, and manifested in its insignia.

Highest class in many orders, and manifested in its insignia.

Josef Graf Radetzky wearing the Grand Cross's star and the sash of the Military Order of Maria Theresa
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Sometimes a holder of the highest class or grade are referred to as "Commander Grand Cross", "Knight Grand Cross", or just "Grand Cross".

Badge of the Order

Order of Saint Michael

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French dynastic order of chivalry, founded by King Louis XI of France on 1 August 1469, in competitive response to the Order of the Golden Fleece founded by Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy, Louis' chief competitor for the allegiance of the great houses of France, the dukes of Orléans, Berry, and Brittany.

French dynastic order of chivalry, founded by King Louis XI of France on 1 August 1469, in competitive response to the Order of the Golden Fleece founded by Duke Philip the Good of Burgundy, Louis' chief competitor for the allegiance of the great houses of France, the dukes of Orléans, Berry, and Brittany.

Badge of the Order
King Louis XI sitting on his throne. In the room, a painting of St. Michael killing a serpent. Title page of the Order's statutes, drawn by Jean Fouquet in the 15th century. Bibliothèque Nationale, fr. 19819
Plaque marking the former site of the Chapel of Saint-Michel du Palais, home of the Order from 1496 to 1555
Charles VIII of France, son of Louis XI, wearing the collar of the Order of Saint Michael
Louis XII of France wearing the collar of the Order
King Francis I presiding the Order's knights. Painting from a copy of the statutes from about 1530.
Collar of the Order as used on the Royal Arms of France

The first knights were among the most powerful nobles in France, close relatives of the king and a few from other royal houses in Europe.

The first page of Knight's Tale in the Ellesmere manuscript

The Knight's Tale

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First tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

First tale from Geoffrey Chaucer's The Canterbury Tales.

The first page of Knight's Tale in the Ellesmere manuscript

Two cousins and knights, Palamon and Arcite, are captured and imprisoned by Theseus, duke of Athens, after being found unconscious following his battle against Creon.

Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard

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Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard (c.

Pierre Terrail, seigneur de Bayard (c.

Chevalier Bayard in a 16th-century French school painting.
Bayard at the Battle of Garigliano (1503), by Philippoteaux
Statue of Pierre Terrail, Seigneur de Bayard, in Sainte-Anne-d'Auray, France. 1893 statue.
Bayard by Aristide Croisy (1893) Charleville-Mézières
Statue at Grenoble, Nicolas-Bernard Raggi sculptor

1476 – 30 April 1524) was a French knight and military leader at the transition between the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, generally known as the Chevalier de Bayard.