Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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Title page of the first Castilian-language translation of Tirant lo Blanc, printed in Valladolid by Diego de Gumiel

Joanot Martorell

Title page of the first Castilian-language translation of Tirant lo Blanc, printed in Valladolid by Diego de Gumiel

Joanot Martorell (c. 1410 – 1465) was a Valencian knight and writer, best-known for authoring the novel Tirant lo Blanch, written in Valencian and published at Valencia in 1490.

The pennon of Sir Henry Percy captured by James Douglas, Earl of Douglas

Henry Percy (Hotspur)

The pennon of Sir Henry Percy captured by James Douglas, Earl of Douglas
Statue of Harry Hotspur in Alnwick, Northumberland, unveiled in 2010
Arms of Hotspur
Shortly after Henry died in battle, his uncle was executed. An attainder was issued and the family's property, including Wressle Castle in Yorkshire, was confiscated by the Crown.
Warkworth Castle, the home of Henry Percy

Sir Henry Percy (20 May 1364 – 21 July 1403), nicknamed Hotspur, was an English knight who fought in several campaigns against the Scots in the northern border and against the French during the Hundred Years' War.

Ten different types of helmets with different design, materials, amount of head coverage, and accessories to provide maximum protection for specific use cases

Helmet

Form of protective gear worn to protect the head.

Form of protective gear worn to protect the head.

Ten different types of helmets with different design, materials, amount of head coverage, and accessories to provide maximum protection for specific use cases
Cyclist wearing a bicycle helmet
A reenactor wearing a sallet
A motocross helmet showing the elongated visor and chin bar
Typical incline skating gear includes skates, knee and elbow pads, wrist guards, and a helmet.
Boar tusk Minoan helmet, 1600–1500 BCE
Boar tusk Mycenaean helmet, 14th century BCE
Corinthian helmet, 500 BCE
Greek Chalcidian helmet, 500 BCE
Greek pilos helmet, 450–425 BCE
Boeotian helmet, 4th century BCE
Greek Illyrian type helmet, 4th century BCE
Thracian helmet, 4th century BCE
Celtic (Gallic) parade helmet, 350 BCE
Attic helmet, 350 BCE to 300 BCE
Greek bronze Phrygian helmet, 350 BCE to 300 BCE
Roman cavalry helmet, 1st century CE
Roman cavalry helmet
Black Mongolian helmet
alt=Iranian helmet, iron, bronze rivets and gilding.|Iranian, 7th or 8th century AD Spangenhelm
Early 15th century bascinet with hounskull visor
15th-century German frog-mouth helm used in jousting
Ottoman zischagge helmet, mid-16th century
16th century Maximilian style close helmet
19th-century Japanese kabuto
German Pickelhaube
Late 19th-century pith helmet
Type 90 helmets worn by the Japanese during the Second World War
A German stahlhelm during World War II
Vietnam War era Marine squadron VMA-311 flight helmet
PASGT helmet
Leather and steel firefighting helmet
Ski helmet (left), paragliding helmet (right)
Astronaut helmet
Aviakit motorcyclist "pudding basin" helmet
Full face and open face motorcycle helmets
Hurling/Camogie helmet
Bandy helmet

As the coat of arms was originally designed to distinguish noble combatants on the battlefield or in a tournament, even while covered in armour, it is not surprising that heraldic elements constantly incorporated the shield and the helmet, these often being the most visible parts of a knight's military equipment.

A goshawk

Falconry

Hunting of wild animals in their natural state and habitat by means of a trained bird of prey.

Hunting of wild animals in their natural state and habitat by means of a trained bird of prey.

A goshawk
Flying a saker falcon
Detail of two falconers from
Indian king, Maharaja Suraj Mal of Bharatpur with a hawk
Mughal emperor Akbar with a hawk
The medieval poet Konrad von Altstetten shown with his falcon, in the embrace of his lover. From the Codex Manesse.
Three panels depicting hawking in England from various time periods, as reprinted in Joseph Strutt's 1801 book, The Sports and Pastimes of the People of England from the Earliest Period: The middle panel is from a Saxon manuscript dated to the late 10th century – early 11th century, as of 1801 held in the "Cotton Library", showing a Saxon nobleman and his falconer. The top and bottom panels are drawings from a manuscript held, as of 1801, in the Royal Library, dating from the early 14th century, showing parties of both sexes hawking by the waterside; the falconer is frightening the fowl to make them rise and the hawk is in the act of seizing upon one of them.
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Icelandic gyrfalcon, 1759, Livrustkammaren
A couple belonging to the Sambal warrior class, documented by the 16th-century Boxer Codex: The female warrior is holding a raptor, which has captured a bird, exemplifying a culture of falconry.
A lady with peregrine falcon on horse
A falconer's red-tailed hawk (Buteo jamaicensis)
Harris's hawk used in falconry
Falconer with a Harris's hawk
A lanner falcon with its lure
A barn owl landing on a falconer's hand
A Mongolian man inspects his golden eagle (Aquila chrysaetos) before competing in an eagle hunting contest in northern Mongolia
A brown falcon used for falconry in Tasmania
A saker falcon used for falconry in Qatar
A hobby
Falconer from Al Ain, Abu Dhabi
Falconry equipment
The Shaw Monument, a falconry observation tower in Scotland.
A white gyrfalcon
Falconry
A falconer from Saudi Arabia, 1970s.

7) Knight: sacre and the sacret

Penguilly l'Haridon: Le Combat des Trente

Combat of the Thirty

Episode in the Breton War of Succession fought to determine who would rule the Duchy of Brittany.

Episode in the Breton War of Succession fought to determine who would rule the Duchy of Brittany.

Penguilly l'Haridon: Le Combat des Trente
Banner attributed to Breton and French knights at the Combat of the Thirty in 1351, during the Breton civil war
Beaumanoir's knights kneel in prayer before battle. Illustration by J. E. Millais to Tom Taylor's translation of a Breton language ballad in Barzaz Breiz
Combat des Trente: an illumination in the Compillation des cronicques et ystoires des Bretons (1480), of Pierre Le Baud. The two strongholds of Ploërmel and Josselin are fancifully depicted within sight of each other.
According to P.Rault show the Franco-Bretons knights wearing tunics with a black cross while the Anglo-Bretons knights wearing tunics with a red cross.

It was an arranged fight between selected combatants from both sides of the conflict, fought at a site midway between the Breton castles of Josselin and Ploërmel among 30 champions, knights, and squires on each side.

A Sipahi, by Melchior Lorck 1646

Sipahi

Sipahi were professional cavalrymen deployed by the Seljuks, and later two types of Ottoman cavalry corps, including the fief-holding provincial timarli sipahi, which constituted most of the army, and the regular kapikulu sipahi, palace troops.

Sipahi were professional cavalrymen deployed by the Seljuks, and later two types of Ottoman cavalry corps, including the fief-holding provincial timarli sipahi, which constituted most of the army, and the regular kapikulu sipahi, palace troops.

A Sipahi, by Melchior Lorck 1646
Sipahi. Manesson Mallet: Art de la Guerre, 1696
Miniature depicting an Anatolian Timariot, dating to before 1657.
Timariot armour dating to 1480–1500
A depiction of Sipahis during the Battle of Vienna

Timarli Sipahis' status resembled that of the knights of medieval Europe.

Cuirass worn by a Carabinier-à-Cheval

Cuirass

Piece of armour that is formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the torso.

Piece of armour that is formed of a single or multiple pieces of metal or other rigid material which covers the torso.

Cuirass worn by a Carabinier-à-Cheval
An Ancient Greek bronze cuirass, dated	between 620 and 580 BC
Indian steel cuirass, 17th to 18th century
M1872 helmet and M1855 cuirass worn by the French Cuirassiers
German helmet and frontal armoured plate for trench warfare, 1916
Japanese cuirass (dō) from the 1600s made from individual large scales (hon iyozane)

The latter portion of the 14th century saw the cuirass gradually come into general use in connection with plate armour for the limbs until, at the close of the century, mail was phased out among the nobles (e.g., knights) except in the camail of the bascinet and at the edge of the hauberk.

Depiction of Chinese swordsman wielding a single-edged sword, from the Dan Dao Fa Xuan, c. 1626

Swordsmanship

Swordsmanship or sword fighting refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword.

Swordsmanship or sword fighting refers to the skills of a swordsman, a person versed in the art of the sword.

Depiction of Chinese swordsman wielding a single-edged sword, from the Dan Dao Fa Xuan, c. 1626
Roman gladius
The MS I.33 manuscript, dated to ca. 1290, shows fencing with the arming sword and the buckler.
Sabre duel of German students, around 1900, painting by Georg Mühlberg (1863–1925)
1763 fencing print from Domenico Angelo's instruction book. Angelo was instrumental in turning fencing into an athletic sport.
Advertisement for Alfred Hutton's swordsmanship show at the Bath Club.
Sherden guards with double-edge swords
A Chinese dao and scabbard of the 18th century
Kendo at an agricultural school in Japan around 1920
An excerpt from the Muyedobotongji: mounted double-sword (마상쌍검; 馬上雙劍)
Filipino soldiers armed with bolos
Angampora exponents with swords and bucklers.

As time passed, the spatha evolved into the arming sword, a weapon with a notable cruciform hilt common among knights in the Medieval Age.

Badge and ribbon of the order

Order of the Companions of Honour

Order of the Commonwealth realms.

Order of the Commonwealth realms.

Badge and ribbon of the order
Lord Tweedsmuir, as Governor General of Canada, wearing the Companion of Honour badge around his neck

The insignia of the order is in the form of an oval medallion, surmounted by a royal crown (but, until recently, surmounted by an imperial crown), and with a rectangular panel within, depicting on it an oak tree, a shield with the Royal Arms of the United Kingdom hanging from one branch, and, on the left, a mounted knight in armour.

Piety: The Knights of the Round Table about to Depart in Quest of the Holy Grail by William Dyce (1849)

Knights of the Round Table

Piety: The Knights of the Round Table about to Depart in Quest of the Holy Grail by William Dyce (1849)
The attributed arms of Agloval de Galles
"Queen Guenever's Peril." Alfred Kappes' illustration for The Boy's King Arthur (1880)
The arms of Arthur le Petit
Shared attributed arms of Blamor and Blioberis
Brandelis' attributed arms
The attributed arms of Calogrenant
Calogrenant at the fountain in the BN MS fr.1433 manuscript of Yvain ou le chevalier au lion (c. 1325)
The attributed arms of "Dodinet le Sauvaige"
The arms of Helain le Blanc
The attributed arms of "Herec le fils Lac"
The attributed arms of "Exclabor ly Viescovtiens"
The attributed arms of the Duc de Clerence
Girflet's attributed arms
Giflet throwing Excalibur into the lake in a 1470 illustration for the 13th-century romance La Mort du roi Arthur
The attributed arms of Hector des Mares
Lancelot stops his half-brother Hector from killing Arthur defeated in battle, as depicted by William Dyce in King Arthur Unhorsed, Spared by Sir Launcelot (1852)
The attributed arms of "Lucam le Bouteillier"
Mador's attributed arms
"At last the strange knight smote him to the earth, and gave him such a bugget on the helm as well-night killed him." Lancelot Speed's illustration for The Legends of King Arthur and His Knights, abridged from Malory's Le Morte d'Arthur by James Knowles (1912)
The attributed arms of "Mellienderis"
The attributed arms of Morholt d'Irlande
Saphar's attributed arms
The attributed arms of "Securades"
"Sir Segwarides rides after Sir Tristram." F. A. Fraser's illustration for Henry Frith's King Arthur and His Knights of the Round Table (1912)
The attributed arms of Tor
The attributed arms of Yvain the Bastard
His attributed arms
Le Morte d'Arthur scene of Guinevere with some of her unarmed knights before they are ambushed by Maleagant, as depicted in Queen Guinevere's Maying by John Collier
The attributed arms of Seguran le Brun

The Knights of the Round Table (Marchogion y Ford Gron, Marghekyon an Moos Krenn, Marc'hegien an Daol Grenn) are the knights of the fellowship of King Arthur in the literary cycle of the Matter of Britain.