A report on Knight

A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.
A Norman knight slaying Harold Godwinson (Bayeux tapestry, c. 1070). The rank of knight developed in the 12th century from the mounted warriors of the 10th and 11th centuries.
The battle between the Turks and Christian knights during the Ottoman wars in Europe
David I of Scotland knighting a squire
The miles Christianus allegory (mid-13th century), showing a knight armed with virtues and facing the vices in mortal combat. The parts of his armour are identified with Christian virtues, thus correlating essential military equipment with the religious values of chivalry: 
The helmet is spes futuri gaudii (hope of future bliss), the shield (here the shield of the Trinity) is fides (faith), the armour is caritas (charity), the lance is perseverantia (perseverance), the sword is verbum Dei (the word of God), the banner is regni celestis desiderium (desire for the kingdom of heaven), the horse is bona voluntas (good will), the saddle is Christiana religio (Christian religion), the saddlecloth is humilitas (humility), the reins are discretio (discretion), the spurs are disciplina (discipline), the stirrups are propositum boni operis (proposition of good work), and the horse's four hooves are delectatio, consensus, bonum opus, consuetudo (delight, consent, good work, and exercise).
Tournament from the Codex Manesse, depicting the mêlée
Elements of a harness of the late style of Gothic plate armour that was a popular style in the mid 15th to early 16th century (depiction made in the 18th century)
Page from King René's Tournament Book (BnF Ms Fr 2695)
The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.
Fortified house – a family seat of a knight (Schloss Hart by the Harter Graben near Kindberg, Austria)
The Battle of Grunwald between Poland-Lithuania and the Teutonic Knights in 1410
Pippo Spano, the member of the Order of the Dragon
The English fighting the French knights at the Battle of Crécy in 1346
Miniature from Jean Froissart Chronicles depicting the Battle of Montiel (Castilian Civil War, in the Hundred Years' War)
A modern artistic rendition of a chevalière of the Late Middle Ages.
A battle of the Reconquista from the Cantigas de Santa Maria
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The Battle of Pavia in 1525. Landsknecht mercenaries with arquebus.

Person granted an honorary title of knighthood by a head of state or representative for service to the monarch, the church or the country, especially in a military capacity.

- Knight
A 14th century depiction of the 13th century German knight Hartmann von Aue, from the Codex Manesse.

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State of the Teutonic Order

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Medieval crusader state, located in Central Europe along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea.

Medieval crusader state, located in Central Europe along the southeastern shore of the Baltic Sea.

The State of the Teutonic Order in 1422
Teutonic state in 1260
The State of the Teutonic Order in 1422
The Battle of Płowce (1331) was a major battle of the Second Polish–Teutonic War (19th-century painting by Juliusz Kossak)
Teutonic state in 1410
The Battle of Grunwald (1410) marked the start of decline of the State of the Teutonic Order (19th-century painting by Jan Matejko)
The Polish–Teutonic peace treaty of 1466 made the Teutonic state a fief of the Kingdom of Poland
Teutonic state in 1466
The Prussian Homage of 1525 established Ducal Prussia as a vassal duchy of the Kingdom of Poland, in place of the State of the Teutonic Order

The crusades, involving many of Europe's knights, lasted for sixty years.

The German Hyghalmen Roll was made in the late 15th century and illustrates the German practice of repeating themes from the arms in the crest. (See Roll of arms).

Heraldry

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Discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings , as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, rank and pedigree.

Discipline relating to the design, display and study of armorial bearings , as well as related disciplines, such as vexillology, together with the study of ceremony, rank and pedigree.

The German Hyghalmen Roll was made in the late 15th century and illustrates the German practice of repeating themes from the arms in the crest. (See Roll of arms).
Enamel from the tomb of Geoffrey Plantagenet, Count of Anjou, one of the earliest depictions of modern heraldry.
Two pursuivants wearing tabards, Windsor Castle, 2006.
A shield parted per pale and per fir twig fess. Coat of arms of former Finnish municipality of Varpaisjärvi.
An extravagant example of marshalling: the 719 quarterings of the Grenville Armorial at Stowe House
German heraldry has examples of shields with numerous crests, as this arms of Saxe-Altenburg featuring a total of seven crests. Some thaler coins display as many as fifteen.
Flags as supporters and orders in the armory of the Prince of Vergara.
The coat of arms of Mikkeli, a city of South Savonia, Finland, has been drawn up in honour of the headquarters of the Finnish Army led by Marshal C. G. E. Mannerheim; this was stationed in the city during the Winter War, the Continuation War and the Lapland War. The coat of arms was originally used without the Mannerheim Cross, and is the third coat of arms affixed to the city.
Coat of Arms of the Turiec county in Slovakia.
State Emblem of the Soviet Union (1956-1991 version)
Arms created in 1977, featuring a hydrocarbon molecule
Military coat of arms, depicting a red locomotive.
Reverse of the Narmer Palette, circa 3100 BC. The top row depicts four men carrying standards.  Directly above them is a serekh containing the name of the king, Narmer.
Fresco depicting a shield of a type common in Mycenaean Greece.
Vase with Greek soldiers in armor, circa 550 BC.
A reconstruction of a shield that would have been carried by a Roman Legionary.
Shields from the "Magister Militum Praesentalis II". From the Notitia Dignitatum, a medieval copy of a Late Roman register of military commands.
The death of King Harold, from the Bayeux Tapestry. The shields look heraldic, but do not seem to have been personal or hereditary emblems.

If the armiger has the title of baron, hereditary knight, or higher, he may display a coronet of rank above the shield.

Norman-style kite shield.

Kite shield

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Large, almond-shaped shield rounded at the top and curving down to a point or rounded point at the bottom.

Large, almond-shaped shield rounded at the top and curving down to a point or rounded point at the bottom.

Norman-style kite shield.
Kite shield on the Bayeux tapestry
Kite shields as depicted on the Temple Pyx
A 15th century depiction of the Archangel Michael with a kiteshield
Reenactors with kite shields

To compensate for their awkward nature, kite shields were equipped with enarmes, which gripped the shield tightly to the arm and facilitated keeping it in place even when a knight relaxed their arm; this was a significant departure from most earlier circular shields, which possessed only a single handle.

Gilles de Rais by Éloi Firmin Féron (1835)

(artist's impression; no contemporary portrait has survived)

Gilles de Rais

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Gilles de Rais by Éloi Firmin Féron (1835)

(artist's impression; no contemporary portrait has survived)
Coat of arms of Gilles de Rais.
Trial of Gilles de Rais.
Execution of Gilles de Rais.

Gilles de Rais (date of birth unknown, not earlier than 1405 – 26 October 1440), Baron de Rais, was a knight and lord from Brittany, Anjou and Poitou, a leader in the French army, and a companion-in-arms of Joan of Arc.

The pennon of Sir Henry Percy captured by James Douglas, Earl of Douglas

Henry Percy (Hotspur)

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The pennon of Sir Henry Percy captured by James Douglas, Earl of Douglas
Statue of Harry Hotspur in Alnwick, Northumberland, unveiled in 2010
Arms of Hotspur
Shortly after Henry died in battle, his uncle was executed. An attainder was issued and the family's property, including Wressle Castle in Yorkshire, was confiscated by the Crown.
Warkworth Castle, the home of Henry Percy

Sir Henry Percy (20 May 1364 – 21 July 1403), nicknamed Hotspur, was an English knight who fought in several campaigns against the Scots in the northern border and against the French during the Hundred Years' War.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591

Francis Drake

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Sir Francis Drake (c.

Sir Francis Drake (c.

Portrait by Marcus Gheeraerts the Younger, 1591
Portrait miniature by Nicholas Hilliard, 1581, reverse of "Drake Jewel", inscribed Aetatis suae 42, An(n)o D(omi)ni 1581 ("42 years of his age, 1581 AD")
A map of Drake's route around the world. The northern limit of Drake's exploration of the Pacific coast of North America is still in dispute. Drake's Bay is south of Cape Mendocino.
A replica of the Golden Hind at Bankside in London
Drake's landing in California, engraving published 1590 by Theodor de Bry
Drake viewing treasure taken from a Spanish ship, print courtesy New York Public Library
The "Drake Jewel" as painted by Gheeraerts the Younger in a 1591 portrait of Drake
Buckland Abbey in Devon
Map of Drake's Great Expedition in 1585 by Giovanni Battista Boazio
Drake's burial at sea off Portobello. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock.
Arms of Sir Francis Drake: Sable, a fess wavy between two pole-stars Arctic and Antarctic argent
Arms of Drake of Ash: Argent, a wyvern wings displayed and tail nowed gules.<ref name="Vivian 1895, p.292">Vivian, Lt.Col. J.L., (Ed.) The Visitations of the County of Devon: Comprising the Heralds' Visitations of 1531, 1564 & 1620, Exeter, 1895, p. 292, pedigree of Drake of Ash</ref> The Drake family of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey used the same arms but the tail of the wyvern is not nowed (knotted)<ref name="Vivian p.299">Vivian, p.299, pedigree of Drake of Crowndale and Buckland Abbey</ref>
Sir Francis Drake with his new heraldic achievement, with motto: Sic Parvis Magna, translated literally: "Thus great things from small things (come)". The hand out of the clouds is labelled Auxilio Divino, or "With Divine Help"<ref name=NationalTrust>{{cite web |url=http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |title=Image details |publisher=National Trust Images |access-date=25 October 2012 |archive-date=3 September 2012 |archive-url=https://archive.today/20120903192626/http://www.nationaltrustimages.org.uk/image/169478 |url-status=live }}</ref>
Sir Francis Drake whilst playing bowls on Plymouth Hoe is informed of the approach of the Spanish Armada. Bronze plaque by Joseph Boehm, 1883, base of Drake statue, Tavistock
Eighteenth century portrait of the Spanish Armada by Philip James de Loutherbourg
Drake taking the surrender of Admiral Pedro de Valdés on the Spanish galleon Nuestra Señora del Rosario
This portrait, circa 1581, may have been copied from Hilliard's [[:Image:Sfdrake42.jpg|miniature]]—note the similar shirt—and the somewhat oddly-proportioned body, added by an artist who did not have access to Drake. National Portrait Gallery, London.
Bronze statue in Tavistock, in the parish of which he was born, by Joseph Boehm, 1883.
Drake Jewel, on loan at the Victoria and Albert Museum, London

Elizabeth I awarded Drake a knighthood in 1581 which he received on the Golden Hind in Deptford.

Winkelriedskapelle (Drachenkapelle) dedicated to Winkelried (1828 etching). The building depicted here replaces an earlier chapel, constructed in 1893 but destroyed in 1798 in the French invasion of Switzerland. The 1672 building may in turn have built on the site of an older chapel.

Heinrich von Winkelried

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Heinrich von Winkelried (d.

Heinrich von Winkelried (d.

Winkelriedskapelle (Drachenkapelle) dedicated to Winkelried (1828 etching). The building depicted here replaces an earlier chapel, constructed in 1893 but destroyed in 1798 in the French invasion of Switzerland. The 1672 building may in turn have built on the site of an older chapel.
Schrutan's fight with the dragon, by Karl Jauslin (1842&ndash;1904)

after 1303), known as Schrutan or Strut "the giant", was a medieval knight in what is now Central Switzerland.

Adrian von Bubenberg on horseback (Diebold Schilling the Elder)

Adrian von Bubenberg

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Adrian von Bubenberg on horseback (Diebold Schilling the Elder)
The monument in its original setting (1915 photograph)

Adrian von Bubenberg (born c. 1424 in Bern; died August 1479 in Bern) was a Bernese knight, military commander and mayor (Schultheiss) of Bern in 1468-1469, 1473-1474 and 1477-1479.

Geometrical construction of the Reuleaux triangle style of heater shield, for use as an heraldic escutcheon

Heater shield

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Form of European medieval shield, developing from the early medieval kite shield in the late 12th century in response to the declining importance of the shield in combat thanks to improvements in leg armour.

Form of European medieval shield, developing from the early medieval kite shield in the late 12th century in response to the declining importance of the shield in combat thanks to improvements in leg armour.

Geometrical construction of the Reuleaux triangle style of heater shield, for use as an heraldic escutcheon
Effigy of William Longespée the Younger (d. 1250) in Salisbury Cathedral, showing an early triangular heater shield
Heraldic roll of arms displaying heater-shaped heraldic shields or escutcheons. Hyghalmen Roll, Germany, late 15th century

The heater shield was used by almost every class of society in medieval Europe, from knights to typical soldiers.

Boucicaut praying to Saint Catherine from the Hours of Jean de Boucicaut

Jean II Le Maingre

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Boucicaut praying to Saint Catherine from the Hours of Jean de Boucicaut
Arms of Jean II Le Meingre,d'argent à l'aigle éployée de gueules becquée et membrée d'azur, Argent, an eagle displayed Gules armed and beaked Azure

Jean II Le Maingre (Old French: Jehan le Meingre), also known as Boucicaut (28 August 1366 – 21 June 1421), was a French knight and military leader.