Knight (chess)

knightknightsKnight's Movechess knightchess pieceWhite KnightBlack Knight pieceKnight (chess piece)knight pieceKnight’s Move
The knight is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).wikipedia
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Chess

chess playerchess gamewestern chess
The knight is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).
Each player begins with 16 pieces: one king, one queen, two rooks, two knights, two bishops, and eight pawns.

Chess piece

piecepieceschess pieces
The knight is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).
2 knights

Bishop (chess)

bishopbishopschess bishop
Moreover, it takes more moves for an uncentralized knight to switch operation to the opposite side of the board than an uncentralized bishop, rook, or queen.
Bishops, like all other pieces except the knight, cannot jump over other pieces.

Rook (chess)

rookrookschess rook
Moreover, it takes more moves for an uncentralized knight to switch operation to the opposite side of the board than an uncentralized bishop, rook, or queen. The knight, along with the king and the rook, has the oldest defined movement of any chess piece, its movement being unchanged since the invention of chaturanga in India around the 6th century.
In general, rooks are stronger than bishops or knights (which are called minor pieces) and are considered greater in value than either of those pieces by nearly two pawns but less valuable than two minor pieces by approximately a pawn.

Pawn (chess)

pawnpawnschess pawn
The knight is the only piece that can move at the beginning of the game without first moving a pawn.
The piece most often selected for underpromotion is a knight, used to execute a checkmate or a fork to gain a significant net increase in material.

Fork (chess)

forkforkingforks
Because of its move pattern, the knight is especially well-suited for executing a fork.
Besides attacking pieces, a target of a fork can be a direct mating threat (for example, attacking an unprotected knight while simultaneously setting up a battery of queen and bishop to threaten mate).

Chess endgame

endgameendgamesending
In an endgame without other pieces or pawns, two knights generally have a better chance against a queen than two bishops or a bishop and a knight (see Fortress (chess)).
Usually in the endgame, the stronger side (the one with more using the standard piece point count system) should try to exchange pieces (knights, bishops, rooks, and queens), while avoiding the exchange of pawns.

Outpost (chess)

outpostoutpostsknight outpost
A knight is best when it has a "support point" or outpost – a relatively sheltered square where it can be positioned to exert its strength remotely.
Outposts are a favourable position from which to launch an attack, particularly using a knight.

Fortress (chess)

fortressfortressesdefense perimeter
In an endgame without other pieces or pawns, two knights generally have a better chance against a queen than two bishops or a bishop and a knight (see Fortress (chess)).
The knight and rook pawn position in the diagram, however, is a draw only if White's pawn is already on the seventh rank, making this drawing resource available to the defender much less frequently.

Two knights endgame

Troitsky linetwo knightstwo knights versus a pawn
Paradoxically, checkmate with two knights sometimes can be forced if the weaker side has a single extra pawn, but this is a curiosity of little practical value (see two knights endgame).
The two knights endgame is a chess endgame with a king and two knights versus a king.

Pawnless chess endgame

queen versus rookpawnless endgamepawnless endgames
Pawnless endings are a rarity, and if the stronger side has even a single pawn, an extra knight should give him an easy win.
minor pieces are knights and bishops

Fairy chess piece

Betza's funny notationfairy piecesfairy piece
In chess problems and endgame studies, the letter S, standing for the German name for the piece, Springer, is often used (and in some variants of fairy chess N is used for the popular fairy chess piece, the nightrider).
For instance, the knight is the (1,2)-leaper.

Checkmate

matecheckmatingmates
At the end of the game, if one side has only a king and a knight while the other side has only a king, the game is a draw since a checkmate is impossible.
There are four fundamental checkmates when one side has only his king and the other side has only the minimum needed to force checkmate, i.e. (1) one queen, (2) one rook, (3) two bishops on opposite-colored squares, or (4) a bishop and a knight.

José Raúl Capablanca

CapablancaJosé CapablancaJ. R. Capablanca
World Champion José Raúl Capablanca considered that a queen and a knight is usually a better combination than a queen and a bishop.
Capablanca in a lecture and in his book A Primer of Chess pointed out that while the bishop was usually stronger than the knight, queen and knight was usually better than queen and bishop, especially in endings – the bishop merely mimics the queen's diagonal move, while the knight can immediately reach squares the queen cannot.

Descriptive notation

descriptive chess notationdescriptiveEnglish notation
In algebraic notation, the usual modern way of recording chess games, the letter N stands for the knight (K is reserved for the king); in descriptive chess notation, Kt is sometimes used instead, mainly in older literature.
Knight begins with the same letter as king, so it is abbreviated to either Kt (used in older chess literature) or N.

Draw (chess)

drawdrawsdrew
At the end of the game, if one side has only a king and a knight while the other side has only a king, the game is a draw since a checkmate is impossible.
king and knight versus king

Tempo (chess)

tempotempi
Nonetheless, a disadvantage of the knight (compared to the other pieces) is that by itself it cannot lose a move to put the opponent in zugzwang (see triangulation and tempo), while a bishop can.
Kings, queens, bishops, and rooks can lose a tempo; a knight cannot.

Shogi

shōgiJapanese chessamateur 5-dan ranked player
Another related piece is the keima of shogi, which moves like a knight but may only move two squares forward followed by one square sideways, restricting its movement to two possible squares.
2 knights

Triangulation (chess)

triangulationtriangulate
Nonetheless, a disadvantage of the knight (compared to the other pieces) is that by itself it cannot lose a move to put the opponent in zugzwang (see triangulation and tempo), while a bishop can.
A rook can also perform the maneuver, but a knight cannot.

King (chess)

kingkingschess king
The knight, along with the king and the rook, has the oldest defined movement of any chess piece, its movement being unchanged since the invention of chaturanga in India around the 6th century.
A piece is interposed between the king and the attacking piece to break the line of threat (not possible when the attacking piece is a knight or pawn, or when in double check).

Staunton chess set

StauntonStaunton designStaunton pattern
Even among sets of the standard Staunton pattern, the style of the pieces varies.
There were also practical innovations: for the first time a crown emblem was stamped onto a rook and knight of each side, to identify their positioning on to the king's side of the board.

Chaturanga

chaturaṅgachathurangamSathurangam
The knight, along with the king and the rook, has the oldest defined movement of any chess piece, its movement being unchanged since the invention of chaturanga in India around the 6th century.
Ashva (horse) (also spelled Ashwa or Asva): moves the same as a knight in chess.

Game

multiplayergamesmulti-player
The knight is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).

Knight

knighthoodknightedknights
The knight is a piece in the game of chess, representing a knight (armored cavalry).

Horse

horsesracehorseequine
It is normally represented by a horse's head and neck.