Knit cap

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A knit cap, originally of wool (though now often of synthetic fibers) is designed to provide warmth in cold weather.wikipedia
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Pom-pom

pomspompompom-pon
They are sometimes topped with a pom-pom or loose tassels.
The term may refer to large tufts used by cheerleaders, or a small, tighter ball attached to the top of a hat, also known as a bobble or toorie.

Toque

chef's hattoque blanchechef hats
The word tuque is similarly related to the name of the chef's toque, an alternate spelling from Middle Breton, the language spoken by Breton immigrants at the founding of New France. In Canadian English, knit caps are also known as a tuque (pronounced ; also spelled touque or toque), a word closely related to the French word toque, originally referring to a traditional headwear and now used for a type of chef's hat (short for toque blanche, meaning "white hat").
Now it is primarily known as the traditional headgear for professional cooks, except in Canada where the term is primarily used for knit caps.

Jay and Silent Bob

Silent BobJayJay & Silent Bob
Michael Nesmith of The Monkees also wore this hat in his television series, as did Jay in the films of the View Askewniverse, Robert Clothier's character "Relic" in the long-running Canadian TV series The Beachcombers, and Hanna-Barbera's character Loopy de Loop wore a knit cap as well.
In several of the later View Askewniverse films, Jay wears a black knit cap.

Loopy De Loop

Loopy DeLoop
Michael Nesmith of The Monkees also wore this hat in his television series, as did Jay in the films of the View Askewniverse, Robert Clothier's character "Relic" in the long-running Canadian TV series The Beachcombers, and Hanna-Barbera's character Loopy de Loop wore a knit cap as well.
Loopy is a gentleman wolf who mangled the English language in his bid to converse in a French-Canadian accent, and always wore a characteristic tuque knit cap.

Bob and Doug McKenzie

Bob & Doug McKenzieBob and Doug MacKenzieBob and Doug
Famous media characters to sport a knitted cap are the SCTV characters Bob and Doug McKenzie.
Bob and Doug, two dim-witted beer-swilling brothers wearing heavy winter clothing and tuques, would comment on various elements of Canadian life and culture, frequently employing the interjection "Eh?"

Michael Nesmith

Mike NesmithNesmith
Michael Nesmith of The Monkees also wore this hat in his television series, as did Jay in the films of the View Askewniverse, Robert Clothier's character "Relic" in the long-running Canadian TV series The Beachcombers, and Hanna-Barbera's character Loopy de Loop wore a knit cap as well.
He rode his motorcycle to the audition, and wore a wool hat to keep his hair out of his eyes; producers Bob Rafelson and Bert Schneider remembered the "wool hat" guy, and called Nesmith back.

Folk costume

national costumenational dresstraditional dress
It is still found in many of the Scandinavian folk costumes for men.

Canadian English

EnglishCanadianCanada
In Canadian English, knit caps are also known as a tuque (pronounced ; also spelled touque or toque), a word closely related to the French word toque, originally referring to a traditional headwear and now used for a type of chef's hat (short for toque blanche, meaning "white hat").

Balaclava (clothing)

balaclavabalaclavasski mask
A special type of cap called a balaclava folds down over the head with openings for just the face or for the eyes or mouth only.

List of Firefly (TV series) characters

Jayne CobbInara SerraKaylee Frye
Jayne Cobb from the TV series Firefly wore an orange sherpa knitted and sent him by his mother in the episode "The Message".
In the same episode, he proudly sports an orange and yellow knit cap with earflaps and an orange pom-pom (a tuque), simply because his mother made it for him, to "keep him warm" as he traveled through space.

Eric Cartman

CartmanEric
Characters in the animated series South Park, including Eric Cartman and Stan Marsh, usually wear knitted caps.
Cartman is usually depicted wearing winter attire which consists of a red coat, brown pants, yellow gloves/mittens, and a yellow-brimmed turquoise knit cap tapered with a yellow pom-pom.

The Dog Who Stopped the War

La guerre des tuques
A 1984 Québécois film about an enormous snowball fight has the French title La guerre des tuques (The War of the Tuques).
The Dog Who Stopped the War (La guerre des tuques, "The Toque War") is a French Canadian drama film from Quebec, directed by André Melançon.

Monmouth cap

The precursor to the modern tuque was a small, round, close-fitting hat, brimless or with a giant brim known as a Monmouth cap.

Jacques Plante

Plante, JacquesPlante
One of the more notable wearers of the tuque was Jacques Plante, the Hall of Fame goaltender for the Montreal Canadiens ice hockey team throughout the 1950s.
His mother taught him how to knit his own tuques to protect him from the cold.

Stan Marsh

StanStan Marsh’s
Characters in the animated series South Park, including Eric Cartman and Stan Marsh, usually wear knitted caps.
Stan is usually depicted in winter attire which consists of a brown jacket, blue denim jeans, red gloves/mittens, and a red-brimmed blue knit cap adorned with a decorative red pom-pom.

La Tuque, Quebec

La TuqueCity of La TuqueLa Croche
A town in Quebec is known as La Tuque, named after a nearby hill that resembles a tuque.
The name, which dates to the eighteenth century, originates from a nearby rock formation which resembles the well-known French-Canadian hat known as the tuque.

2003 Heritage Classic

Heritage Classic20032003 NHL Heritage Classic
During the 2003 Heritage Classic game (which was played at temperatures below -15 °C), another Canadiens goaltender, José Théodore, wore a tuque on top of his goalie mask.
Goaltender Jose Theodore wore a Canadiens tuque over the top of his goalie mask.

Beanie (seamed cap)

beaniepropeller beaniebeanies
In parts of the English-speaking world, this type of knitted hat is traditionally called a beanie, but in parts of Canada and the US, the word "beanie" is used to denote a completely different, less floppy, cap that is not knitted, but rather made up of joined panels of felt, twill, or other tightly woven cloth (see Beanie (seamed cap)).
In some U.S. regions and parts of Canada the term "beanie" refers to a knitted cap (often woollen), alternately called a "stocking cap" or "toque".

Bad Day (Daniel Powter song)

Bad DayBad Day" (Daniel Powter song)You Fucked a Bad Gay
Canadian Daniel Powter also wore a blue knitted cap during the music video for "Bad Day".
Throughout the video, Powter is shown playing piano while wearing a tuque—a type of knitted hat.

Animal hat

It is often similar to a beanie, with facial features, added ears and sometimes details such as whiskers, although versions made from fake fur are also known by this name.

Southern American English

Southern accentSouthernSouthern American
In Southern American English it is sometimes called a toboggan.

Canada

CanadianCANCanadians
In Canada, it is often referred to as a toque or tuque.
Material items such as Canadian beer, maple syrup, tuques, canoes, nanaimo bars, butter tarts and the Quebec dish of poutine are defined as uniquely Canadian.

Wool

fleecewool tradefleeces
A knit cap, originally of wool (though now often of synthetic fibers) is designed to provide warmth in cold weather.