Kongo language

KikongoKongoKikongo languageYombeCongoleseFioteKi-KongokonKoongoLaadi
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.wikipedia
247 Related Articles

Kongo people

BakongoKongoCongolese
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.
The Kongo people (Esikongo, singular: Mwisikngo; also Bakongo, singular: Mukongo) are a Bantu ethnic group primarily defined as the speakers of Kikongo (Kongo languages).

Angola

Republic of AngolaAngolanAO
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.
Angola, officially the Republic of Angola (República de Angola; Kikongo, Kimbundu and ), is a west-coast country of south-central Africa.

Democratic Republic of the Congo

Democratic Republic of CongoCongoDR Congo
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.
The word Kongo comes from the Kongo language (also called Kikongo).

Bantu languages

BantuBantu languageBantu-speaking
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.

Kituba language

KitubaKikongoMunukutuba
Kikongo is the base for a creole used throughout the region: Kituba, also called Kikongo de l'État or Kikongo ya Leta ("Kongo of the state" in French or Kongo), Kituba and Monokituba (also Munukituba).
It is a creole language based on Kikongo, a family of closely related Bantu languages.

Kingdom of Loango

LoangoLoango KingdomLoango Coast
Additional dictionaries were created by French missionaries to the Loango coast in the 1780s, and a word list was published by Bernardo da Canecattim in 1805.
The inhabitants, who are a branch of the Bakongo, spoke a northern dialect of the Kikongo language also spoken in the Kingdom of Kongo.

Palenquero

PalenquePalenque Creole languagepalenqueros
It is also one of the sources of the Gullah language and the Palenquero creole in Colombia. Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.
Its sole substrate is likely the Kikongo language, which is spoken in the Congo, Democratic Republic of the Congo and Angola.

Kongo languages

KongoCongolese
According to Malcolm Guthrie, Kikongo is in the language group H10, the Kongo languages.
: Beembe (Pangwa, Doondo, Kamba, Hangala), Ndingi, Kunyi, Mboka, Kongo, Western Kongo, Laari (Laadi), Vili, Yombe, Suundi

Bembe language (Kibembe)

BeembeBembeBembe (Kibembe)
Other languages in the same group include Bembe (H11).
It is closely related to Kikongo.

Habla Congo

Habla Congo/Habla BantuLengua Conga
Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.
Habla Congo or Habla Bantu is a Kongo-based liturgical language of the Palo religion with origins in Cuba, Dominican Republic and Puerto Rico, later spreading to other countries in the Caribbean Basin.

Creole language

creolecreolescreole languages
Kikongo is the base for a creole used throughout the region: Kituba, also called Kikongo de l'État or Kikongo ya Leta ("Kongo of the state" in French or Kongo), Kituba and Monokituba (also Munukituba). Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.

Grand Prix of Literary Associations

GPLAGPLA 2017
In 2018, a book written in Kikongo was nominated for the Grand Prix of Literary Associations.
In the 2018 edition, a work written in Kikongo made the shortlist.

Saramaccan language

SaramaccanMatawaiMatawai language
Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.
The African component accounts for about 50% once ritual use is taken into account, the highest percentage in the Americas, and is derived from Niger–Congo languages of West Africa, especially Fon and other Gbe languages, Akan and Central African languages such as Kikongo.

Kumba (roller coaster)

Kumba
The name Kumba was derived from the translation of "Roar" in the African Kongo Language.

Hazel Carter (linguist)

Carter, HazelCarter
Joan Hazel Carter (22 February 1928 – 3 August 2016) was a British-American Linguist, known in particular for her work on the Bantu languages, Shona, Kongo and Tonga.

Haitian Creole

French CreoleCreoleHaitian
Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.
However, the language also inherited many words of different origins, among them Wolof, Fon, Kongo, English, Spanish, Portuguese, Taino and Arabic.

Sacred language

liturgical languageliturgicalritual language
Many African slaves transported in the Atlantic slave trade spoke Kongo, and its influence can be seen in many creole languages in the diaspora, such as Palenquero (spoken by descendants of escaped black slaves in Colombia), Habla Congo/Habla Bantu (the liturgical language of the Afro-Cuban Palo religion), Saramaccan language in Suriname and Haitian Creole.

Republic of the Congo

Republic of CongoCongoCongolese
Kongo or Kikongo is one of the Bantu languages spoken by the Kongo and Ndundu people living in the tropical forests of the Democratic Republic of the Congo, the Republic of the Congo and Angola.

Americas

Americathe AmericasAmerican
It was spoken by many of those who were taken from the region and sold as slaves in the Americas.

Afro-American religion

Afro-Brazilian religionsAfrican diasporic religionsAfro-Brazilian religion
For this reason, while Kongo still is spoken in the above-mentioned countries, creolized forms of the language are found in ritual speech of Afro-American religions, especially in Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Brazil

BRABrasilBrazilian
For this reason, while Kongo still is spoken in the above-mentioned countries, creolized forms of the language are found in ritual speech of Afro-American religions, especially in Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Cuba

Republic of CubaCubanCUB
For this reason, while Kongo still is spoken in the above-mentioned countries, creolized forms of the language are found in ritual speech of Afro-American religions, especially in Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Haiti.

Puerto Rico

Puerto RicanCommonwealth of Puerto RicoPuerto Rica
For this reason, while Kongo still is spoken in the above-mentioned countries, creolized forms of the language are found in ritual speech of Afro-American religions, especially in Brazil, Cuba, Puerto Rico, Dominican Republic and Haiti.