Konrad Lorenz

LorenzKonrad Z. LorenzKonrad Zacharias LorenzCivilized Man's Eight Deadly SinsKonrad Lorenz’sLorenz, KonradLorenzianProfessor Konrad Zacharias Lorenz
Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (7 November 1903 – 27 February 1989) was an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist.wikipedia
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Nikolaas Tinbergen

Niko TinbergenTinbergenNico Tinbergen
He shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Nikolaas Tinbergen and Karl von Frisch.
Nikolaas "Niko" Tinbergen (15 April 1907 – 21 December 1988) was a Dutch biologist and ornithologist who shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Karl von Frisch and Konrad Lorenz for their discoveries concerning organization and elicitation of individual and social behavior patterns in animals.

Karl von Frisch

Karl Ritter von FrischFrisch, Karl Von
He shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Nikolaas Tinbergen and Karl von Frisch.
Karl Ritter von Frisch, (20 November 1886 – 12 June 1982) was an Austrian ethologist who received the Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine in 1973, along with Nikolaas Tinbergen and Konrad Lorenz.

Imprinting (psychology)

imprintingimprintimprinted
Working with geese, he investigated the principle of imprinting, the process by which some nidifugous birds (i.e. birds that leave their nest early) bond instinctively with the first moving object that they see within the first hours of hatching.
It was rediscovered by the early ethologist Oskar Heinroth, and studied extensively and popularized by his disciple Konrad Lorenz working with greylag geese.

On Aggression

Hydraulic model of aggression
Lorenz wrote numerous books, some of which, such as King Solomon's Ring, On Aggression, and Man Meets Dog, became popular reading.
On Aggression (Das sogenannte Böse zur Naturgeschichte der Aggression, "So-called Evil: on the natural history of aggression") is a 1963 book by the ethologist Konrad Lorenz; it was translated into English in 1966.

Instinct

instinctsanimal instinctinstinctive
Lorenz studied instinctive behavior in animals, especially in greylag geese and jackdaws.
An interest in innate behaviors arose again in the 1950s with Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen, who made the distinction between instinct and learned behaviors.

King Solomon's Ring (book)

King Solomon's RingKing Solomon's Ring'' (book)
Lorenz wrote numerous books, some of which, such as King Solomon's Ring, On Aggression, and Man Meets Dog, became popular reading.
King Solomon's Ring is a zoological book for the general audience, written by the Austrian scientist Konrad Lorenz in 1949.

Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine

Nobel PrizeNobel Prize in MedicineMedicine
He shared the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine with Nikolaas Tinbergen and Karl von Frisch.
The awarding of the prize in 1973 to Nikolaas Tinbergen, Konrad Lorenz, and Karl von Frisch for their observations of animal behavioral patterns could be considered a prize in the behavioral sciences rather than medicine or physiology.

Ornithology

ornithologistornithologicalornithologists
Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (7 November 1903 – 27 February 1989) was an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist.
The study of imprinting behaviour in ducks and geese by Konrad Lorenz and the studies of instinct in herring gulls by Nicolaas Tinbergen led to the establishment of the field of ethology.

Man Meets Dog

Lorenz wrote numerous books, some of which, such as King Solomon's Ring, On Aggression, and Man Meets Dog, became popular reading.
Man Meets Dog is a zoological book for the general audience, written by the Austrian scientist Konrad Lorenz in 1949.

Austria

AUTAustrianRepublic of Austria
Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (7 November 1903 – 27 February 1989) was an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist.
In addition to them, biologists Gregor Mendel and Konrad Lorenz as well as mathematician Kurt Gödel and engineers such as Ferdinand Porsche and Siegfried Marcus were Austrians.

Western jackdaw

jackdawEurasian jackdawjackdaws
Lorenz studied instinctive behavior in animals, especially in greylag geese and jackdaws.
In his book King Solomon's Ring, Konrad Lorenz described and analysed the complex social interactions in a western jackdaw flock that lived around his house in Altenberg, Austria.

Adolf Lorenz

At the request of his father, Adolf Lorenz, he began a premedical curriculum in 1922 at Columbia University, but he returned to Vienna in 1923 to continue his studies at the University of Vienna.
He was the father of famed ethologist Konrad Lorenz (1903-1989).

Behind the Mirror: A Search for a Natural History of Human Knowledge

Behind the Mirror
The manuscript became his 1973 book Behind the Mirror.
Behind the mirror, a search for a natural history of human knowledge (Die Rückseite des Spiegels, Versuch einer Naturgeschichte menschlichen Erkennens) is a 1973 book by Konrad Lorenz.

University of Vienna

ViennaVienna UniversityUniversität Wien
At the request of his father, Adolf Lorenz, he began a premedical curriculum in 1922 at Columbia University, but he returned to Vienna in 1923 to continue his studies at the University of Vienna.
Nobel Prize Laureates who taught at the University of Vienna include Robert Bárány, Julius Wagner-Jauregg, Hans Fischer, Karl Landsteiner, Erwin Schrödinger, Victor Franz Hess, Otto Loewi, Konrad Lorenz and Friedrich Hayek.

Ethology

ethologistanimal behavioranimal behaviour
Konrad Zacharias Lorenz (7 November 1903 – 27 February 1989) was an Austrian zoologist, ethologist, and ornithologist.
The modern discipline of ethology is generally considered to have begun during the 1930s with the work of Dutch biologist Nikolaas Tinbergen (1907-1988) and of Austrian biologists Konrad Lorenz and Karl von Frisch (1886-1982), the three recipients of the 1973 Nobel Prize in Physiology or Medicine.

Oskar Heinroth

Heinroth
He developed an approach that began with an earlier generation, including his teacher Oskar Heinroth.
The idea that this response was instinctive was examined in greater detail by Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen.

Greylag goose

greylag geeseGraylag gooseAnser anser
Lorenz studied instinctive behavior in animals, especially in greylag geese and jackdaws.
In ethology, the greylag goose was the subject of Konrad Lorenz's pioneering studies of imprinting behaviour.

Hawk/goose effect

He developed a theory of instinctive behavior that saw behavior patterns as largely innate but triggered through environmental stimuli, for example the hawk/goose effect.
Friedrich Goethe conducted experiments with silhouettes to examine alarm reactions in 1937 and a more systematic study was conducted in the same year by Konrad Lorenz and Nikolaas Tinbergen which is considered one of the classic experiments of ethology.

Group selection

multi-level selectiongroupmultilevel selection theory
However, Richard Dawkins called Lorenz a "'good of the species' man", stating that the idea of group selection was "so deeply ingrained" in Lorenz's thinking that he "evidently did not realize that his statements contravened orthodox Darwinian theory."
Early authors such as V. C. Wynne-Edwards and Konrad Lorenz argued that the behavior of animals could affect their survival and reproduction as groups, speaking for instance of actions for the good of the species.

Julian Huxley

Sir Julian HuxleyJulian Sorell HuxleyJulian S. Huxley
He was a friend and student of renowned biologist Sir Julian Huxley (grandson of "Darwin's bulldog", Thomas Henry Huxley).
Huxley was a friend and mentor of the biologists and Nobel laureates Konrad Lorenz and Niko Tinbergen, and taught and encouraged many others.

Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology

Max-Planck Institute for Behavioral PhysiologyMax-Planck-Institut für Verhaltensphysiologie
In 1958, Lorenz transferred to the Max Planck Institute for Behavioral Physiology in Seewiesen.
A working group was founded in 1954 by Erich von Holst (Max Planck Institute for Oceanic biology, Wilhelmshaven) and Konrad Lorenz.

Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research

Konrad Lorenz InstituteKonrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and CognitionKonrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI)
There are three research institutions named after Lorenz in Austria: the Konrad Lorenz Institute for Evolution and Cognition Research (KLI) was housed in Lorenz' family mansion at Altenberg before moving to Klosterneuburg in 2013 ; the Konrad Lorenz Forschungsstelle (KLF) at his former field station in Grünau; and the Konrad Lorenz Institute of Ethology, an external research facility of the University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna.
Until 2013, the institute was located in the family mansion of the Nobel Laureate Konrad Lorenz in Altenberg.

Supernormal stimulus

supernormal stimuliSupernormal Stimuli: How Primal Urges Overran Their Evolutionary Purposesuperstimuli
They experimented with "supernormal stimuli" such as giant eggs or dummy bird beaks which they found could release the fixed action patterns more powerfully than the natural objects for which the behaviors were adapted.
In the 1950s, Konrad Lorenz observed that birds would select brooding eggs that resembled those of their own species but which were larger.

Rudolf Hippius

He sought to be a motorcycle mechanic, but instead he was assigned as a military psychologist, conducting racial studies on humans in occupied Poznań under Rudolf Hippius.
It was during this period that Konrad Lorenz worked with him on the project, and which was to affect the later reputation of Lorenz.

Max Planck Society

Max Planck InstituteMax-Planck-InstituteMax-Planck Institute
The Max Planck Society established the Lorenz Institute for Behavioral Physiology in Buldern, Germany, in 1950.