Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth KoreaKORCoreaChaoxianHangukKoreasKRSouth Korean
Korea is a region in East Asia consisting of the Korean Peninsula, Jeju Island, and several minor islands near the peninsula.wikipedia
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South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
Korea has been divided since 1948 between two distinct sovereign states, North Korea and South Korea.
The name Korea is derived from Goguryeo which was one of the great powers in East Asia during its time, ruling most of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria, parts of the Russian Far East and Inner Mongolia under Gwanggaeto the Great.

Division of Korea

partition of Korea38th Paralleldivided
Korea has been divided since 1948 between two distinct sovereign states, North Korea and South Korea.
With the declaration of the Soviet-Japanese War, the Soviet Union occupied the north of Korea, and the United States occupied the south, with the boundary between their zones being the 38th parallel.

Three Kingdoms of Korea

Three KingdomsThree Kingdoms periodKorea
During the first half of the 1st millennium, Korea was divided between the three competing states of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla, together known as the "Three Kingdoms of Korea". Goguryeo experienced a golden age under Gwanggaeto the Great and his son Jangsu, who both subdued Baekje and Silla during their times, achieving a brief unification of the Three Kingdoms of Korea and becoming the most dominant power on the Korean Peninsula.
Goguryeo was later known as Goryeo, from which the modern name Korea is derived.

Sea of Japan

Japan SeaEast SeaJapan
Korea is bordered by Russia to the northeast, China to the northwest, and neighbours Japan to the east via the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan (East Sea).
It is bordered by Japan, Korea (North and South) and Russia.

Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
After the First Sino-Japanese War, despite the Korean Empire's effort to modernize, the country was annexed by Japan in 1910 and ruled by it until the end of World War II in August 1945.
Japanese Korea, Dai-Nippon Teikoku (Chōsen)) refers to the period when Korea was under Japanese rule, between 1910 and 1945.

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
During the first half of the 1st millennium, Korea was divided between the three competing states of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla, together known as the "Three Kingdoms of Korea".
The name Goryeo (alternatively spelled Koryŏ), a shortened form of Goguryeo (Koguryŏ), was adopted as the official name in the 5th century, and is the origin of the English name "Korea".

Japan

JPNJapaneseJP
Korea is bordered by Russia to the northeast, China to the northwest, and neighbours Japan to the east via the Korea Strait and the Sea of Japan (East Sea).
Buddhism was introduced to Japan from Baekje, Korea and was promoted by Prince Shōtoku, but the subsequent development of Japanese Buddhism was primarily influenced by China.

Korean War

KoreaKoreanKorea War
Tensions between the two resulted in the outbreak of the Korean War in 1950.
Both governments of the two new Korean states claimed to be the sole legitimate government of all of Korea, and neither accepted the border as permanent.

Soviet Civil Administration

Soviet Civil AuthoritySovietadministering the area north
The North was under Soviet occupation and the South under U.S. occupation.
The Soviet Civil Administration (SCA) functioned as the occupying government of northern Korea from October 3, 1945 until the founding of the Democratic People's Republic of Korea in 1948 although it governed concurrently after the setup of the Provisional People's Committee for North Korea in 1946.

Korean Empire

KoreaEmpire of KoreaGreat Korean Empire
After the First Sino-Japanese War, despite the Korean Empire's effort to modernize, the country was annexed by Japan in 1910 and ruled by it until the end of World War II in August 1945.
The Korean Empire (transcripted as Daehan Jeguk, ) was the last independent unified Korean state.

Korean Peninsula

KoreapeninsulaKorean
Korea is a region in East Asia consisting of the Korean Peninsula, Jeju Island, and several minor islands near the peninsula. Silla and Baekje controlled the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, maintaining the former Samhan territories, while Goguryeo controlled the northern half of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria and the Liaodong Peninsula, uniting Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye, and other states in the former Gojoseon territories.
Until the end of World War II, Korea was a single political entity whose territory roughly coincided with the Korean Peninsula.

Taejo of Joseon

Yi Seong-gyeTaejoKing Taejo
Following military resistance under King Gongmin that ended Mongol political influence in Goryeo, severe political strife followed, and Goryeo eventually fell to a coup led by General Yi Seong-gye, who established Joseon in July 17, 1392.
Taejo of Joseon (October 27, 1335 – May 24, 1408), born Yi Seong-gye, whose changed name is Yi Dan, was the founder and the first king of the Joseon dynasty of Korea reigning from 1392 to 1398, and the main figure in overthrowing the Goryeo Dynasty.

Dangun

TangunDangun WanggeomTan'gun
According to legend, Dangun, a descendant of Heaven, established Gojoseon in 2333 .
Dangun or Dangun Wanggeom was the legendary founder and god-king of Gojoseon, the first Korean kingdom, around present-day Liaoning, Manchuria, and the northern part of the Korean Peninsula.

Silla

Silla DynastySilla KingdomShilla
During the first half of the 1st millennium, Korea was divided between the three competing states of Goguryeo, Baekje, and Silla, together known as the "Three Kingdoms of Korea". These three confederacies eventually developed into Baekje, Silla, and Gaya.
In the modern Mongolian language, Korea and Koreans are still known as Солонгос (Solongos), which seems to be an alteration of Silla influenced by the Mongolian word for "rainbow" (солонго solongo).

Yemaek

Yemaek peopleHuimoMaek
The original name was a combination of the adjective go ("high, lofty") with the name of a local Yemaek tribe, whose original name is thought to have been either *Guru (溝樓, "walled city," inferred from some toponyms in Chinese historical documents) or *Gauri (가우리, "center").
They had ancestral ties to various Korean kingdoms including Gojoseon, Buyeo, Goguryeo, and tribes including Okjeo, Dongye, Yangmaek and Sosumaek .

Gaya confederacy

GayaGaya civilizationGaya period
These three confederacies eventually developed into Baekje, Silla, and Gaya.
Gaya was a Korean confederacy of territorial polities in the Nakdong River basin of southern Korea, growing out of the Byeonhan confederacy of the Samhan period.

Hanja

HanchahanmunChinese characters
This was the Hanja for the Korean kingdom of Goryeo, which ruled most of the Korean peninsula during Marco Polo's time.
A major motivation for the introduction of Chinese characters into Korea was the spread of Buddhism.

Dongye

YeWaiYe (Korea)
Silla and Baekje controlled the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, maintaining the former Samhan territories, while Goguryeo controlled the northern half of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria and the Liaodong Peninsula, uniting Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye, and other states in the former Gojoseon territories.
Dongye, which means the Eastern Ye, was a Korean chiefdom which occupied portions of the northeastern Korean peninsula from roughly 3rd-century BC to around early 5th-century.

Okjeo

Eastern OkjeoGoulouNorth Okjeo
Silla and Baekje controlled the southern half of the Korean Peninsula, maintaining the former Samhan territories, while Goguryeo controlled the northern half of the Korean Peninsula, Manchuria and the Liaodong Peninsula, uniting Buyeo, Okjeo, Dongye, and other states in the former Gojoseon territories.
Okjeo was a Korean tribal state which arose in the northern Korean peninsula from perhaps the 2nd century BCE to the 5th century CE.

Yeon Gaesomun

Cheon GaesomunYon Gae Somoon
In 642, the powerful general Yeon Gaesomun led a coup and gained complete control over Goguryeo.
Yeon Gaesomun (603–666) was a powerful military dictator in the waning days of Goguryeo, which was one of the Three Kingdoms of ancient Korea.

Tang dynasty

TangTang ChinaTang Empire
However, Yeon Gaesomun died of a natural cause in 666 and Goguryeo was thrown into chaos and weakened by a succession struggle among his sons and younger brother, with his eldest son defecting to Tang and his younger brother defecting to Silla. General Kim Yu-shin, aided by Tang forces, conquered Baekje after defeating General Gyebaek at the Battle of Hwangsanbeol.
Li Yuan was Duke of Tang and governor of Taiyuan, modern Shanxi, during the Sui dynasty's collapse, which was caused in part by the Sui failure to conquer the northern part of the Korean peninsula during the Goguryeo–Sui War.

Chungcheong Province

ChungcheongChungcheong-doChungcheong, South Korea
Baekje absorbed all of the Mahan states and subjugated most of the western Korean peninsula (including the modern provinces of Gyeonggi, Chungcheong, and Jeolla, as well as parts of Hwanghae and Gangwon) to a centralised government; during the expansion of its territory, Baekje acquired Chinese culture and technology through maritime contacts with the Southern Dynasties.
Chungcheong (Chungcheong-do; ) was one of the eight provinces of Korea during the Joseon Dynasty.

Jangsu of Goguryeo

JangsuKing JangsuTaewang Jangsu
Goguryeo experienced a golden age under Gwanggaeto the Great and his son Jangsu, who both subdued Baekje and Silla during their times, achieving a brief unification of the Three Kingdoms of Korea and becoming the most dominant power on the Korean Peninsula.
During his reign, Jangsu changed the official name of Goguryeo (Koguryŏ) to the shortened Goryeo (Koryŏ), from which the name Korea originates.

Munmu of Silla

King MunmuMunmu30th King Munmu
King Munmu, son of Muyeol and nephew of General Kim Yu-shin, launched another campaign in 667 and Goguryeo fell in the following year.
Munmu of Silla (occasionally spelled: Moonmu) (626–681) (reigned 661–681 ) was the thirtieth king of the Korean kingdom of Silla.

Gyebaek

General GyebaekGye BaekKyebaek
General Kim Yu-shin, aided by Tang forces, conquered Baekje after defeating General Gyebaek at the Battle of Hwangsanbeol.
Gyebaek (died 20 August 660) was a general in the ancient Korean kingdom of Baekje during the early to mid 7th century.