Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupationJapanese occupation of KoreaJapanese ruleJapanese colonial periodKorea was under Japanese ruleJapanese colonial rulecolonial KoreaJapanese rule in Korea
Japanese Korea, Dai-Nippon Teikoku (Chōsen)) refers to the period when Korea was under Japanese rule, between 1910 and 1945.wikipedia
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Korean Empire

KoreaEmpire of KoreaGreat Korean Empire
The Korean Empire became a protectorate of Japan in 1905 in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905 and the country was indirectly ruled by the Japanese through the Resident-General of Korea. In October 1897, Gojong decided to return to his other palace, Deoksugung, and proclaimed the founding of the Korean Empire.
Proclaimed in October 1897 by Emperor Gojong of the Joseon dynasty, the empire stood until Japan's annexation of Korea in August 1910.

Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth Korea
Japanese Korea, Dai-Nippon Teikoku (Chōsen)) refers to the period when Korea was under Japanese rule, between 1910 and 1945.
After the First Sino-Japanese War, despite the Korean Empire's effort to modernize, the country was annexed by Japan in 1910 and ruled by it until the end of World War II in August 1945.

Surrender of Japan

Japanese surrenderJapan's surrenderJapan surrendered
Japanese rule over Korea ended on 15 August 1945 upon the Surrender of Japan in World War II and the armed forces of the United States and the Soviet Union occupied the territory.
While maintaining a sufficient level of diplomatic engagement with the Japanese to give them the impression they might be willing to mediate, the Soviets were covertly preparing to attack Japanese forces in Manchuria and Korea (in addition to South Sakhalin and the Kuril Islands) in fulfillment of promises they had secretly made to the United States and the United Kingdom at the Tehran and Yalta Conferences.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
In 1965, the Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and South Korea declared the unequal treaties between Japan and Korea, especially 1905 and 1910, were "already null and void" at the time of their promulgation.
The succeeding Korean Empire was annexed into the Empire of Japan in 1910.

United States Army Military Government in Korea

Southern KoreaSouth KoreaUnited States Army Military Government
The Division of Korea separated the Korean Peninsula under two governments and economic systems with the northern Soviet Civil Administration and the southern United States Army Military Government in Korea.
The after-effects of the Japanese occupation were still being felt in the occupation zone, as well as in the Soviet zone in the North.

Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910

Japan–Korea Annexation Treatyannexation of KoreaJapan-Korea Annexation Treaty
Japan formally annexed the Korean Empire in 1910 in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, without the consent of Gojong, the regent of the Korean Emperor Sunjong. On 22 August 1910, Japan effectively annexed Korea with the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910 signed by Ye Wanyong, Prime Minister of Korea, and Terauchi Masatake, who became the first Japanese Governor-General of Korea.
The treaty was proclaimed to the public (and became effective) on August 29, 1910, officially starting the period of Japanese rule in Korea.

Gojong of Korea

GojongEmperor GojongKing Gojong
Japan formally annexed the Korean Empire in 1910 in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, without the consent of Gojong, the regent of the Korean Emperor Sunjong.
With the signing of its first unequal treaty, Korea became easy prey for many imperialistic powers, and later the treaty led to Korea being annexed by Japan.

Chinilpa

pro-Japanesepro-Japanese collaboratorscollaborator of Imperial Japan
Japanese rule remains controversial in modern-day North Korea and South Korea and its negative repercussions continue to affect these countries, including the industrialization plan to solely benefit Japan, the exploitation of Korean people, the marginalization of Korean history and culture, the environmental exploitation of the Korean Peninsula, and the status of Japanese collaborators known as Chinilpa.
Chinilpa (친일파, lit. "pro-Japan faction") is a Korean language derogatory term that denotes ethnic Koreans who collaborated with Imperial Japan during its colonial rule in Korea from 1910 to 1945 and the protectorate period of the Korean Empire from 1905.

Busan

PusanBusan, South KoreaBusan Metropolitan City
As a result of the treaty, Japanese merchants came to Busan, which became the center for foreign trade and commerce.
During the Japanese rule, Busan developed into a hub trading port with Japan.

Governor-General of Korea

Government-General of KoreaGovernor-GeneralJapanese Government-General of Korea
The Japanese had established the Korean Peninsula as an overseas colony of Japan administered by the General Government based in Keijō (Gyeongseong) which governed Korea with near-absolute power. On 22 August 1910, Japan effectively annexed Korea with the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910 signed by Ye Wanyong, Prime Minister of Korea, and Terauchi Masatake, who became the first Japanese Governor-General of Korea.
The Governor-General of Chosen was the chief administrator of the Japanese colonial government in Korea from 1910 to 1945.

Keijō

KeijoKyungsungGyeongseong
The Japanese had established the Korean Peninsula as an overseas colony of Japan administered by the General Government based in Keijō (Gyeongseong) which governed Korea with near-absolute power.
Keijō, or Gyeongseong was an administrative district of Korea under Japanese rule.

Sunjong of Korea

SunjongEmperor SunjongEmperor Yunghui
Japan formally annexed the Korean Empire in 1910 in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, without the consent of Gojong, the regent of the Korean Emperor Sunjong.
However, Itō was assassinated by Ahn Jung-geun at Harbin, which led to the Japanese annexation of Korea in 1910.

March 1st Movement

March First MovementMarch 1 MovementSamil Movement
Also, they announced the "Process and formality of "Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910" had hugely deficiency and therefore this treaty was null and void. This meaning was "March 1st Movement" was not an illegal movement".
The March 1st Movement, also known as Sam-il (3-1) Movement (Hangul: 삼일 운동; Hanja: 三一 運動) was one of the earliest public displays of Korean resistance during the rule of Korea by Japan from 1910 to 1945.

National Treasure (North Korea)

National Treasures of North KoreaNational Treasure of North KoreaNational Treasure
The system established by this law, retained as the present-day National Treasures of South Korea and National Treasures of North Korea, was intended to counter the deleterious effects of the speed of economic development as well as the lack of concern by Japanese developers for Korean cultural heritage on Korean historical artifacts, including those not yet unearthed.
The first list of Korean cultural treasures was designated by Governor-General of Korea in 1938 during the Japanese occupation with "The Act of Treasures of the Joseon dynasty".

Pyongyang

P'yŏngyangPyeongyangPyongyang, North Korea
The Japanese administration also relocated some artifacts; for instance, a stone monument, which was originally located in the Liaodong Peninsula, was taken out of its context and moved to Pyongyang.
Much of the city was destroyed during the First Sino-Japanese War, but it was revived under Japanese rule and became an industrial center.

National Treasure (South Korea)

National Treasures of South Koreanational treasure of KoreaNational Treasure
The system established by this law, retained as the present-day National Treasures of South Korea and National Treasures of North Korea, was intended to counter the deleterious effects of the speed of economic development as well as the lack of concern by Japanese developers for Korean cultural heritage on Korean historical artifacts, including those not yet unearthed.
The first list of Korean cultural treasures was designated by Governor-General of Korea in 1938 during the Japanese occupation with "The Act of Treasures of the Joseon dynasty".

Gyeongbokgung

Gyeongbok PalaceGyeongbokgung Palace Gyeongbokgung Palace
According to a Russian eyewitness, Seredin-Sabatin, an employee of the king, a group of Japanese agents entered Gyeongbokgung, killed Queen Min, and desecrated her body in the north wing of the palace.
Due to its status as the symbol of national sovereignty, Gyeongbokgung was extensively damaged during the Japanese occupation of the early 20th century.

Ye Wanyong

Lee Wan-yongYi Wan-yong
On 22 August 1910, Japan effectively annexed Korea with the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910 signed by Ye Wanyong, Prime Minister of Korea, and Terauchi Masatake, who became the first Japanese Governor-General of Korea.
He was pro-Japanese and remembered for signing the Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, which placed Korea under Japanese rule in 1910.

Deoksugung

Deoksu PalaceDeoksugung PalaceDaehanmun
In October 1897, Gojong decided to return to his other palace, Deoksugung, and proclaimed the founding of the Korean Empire.
Deoksugung, also known as Gyeongun-gung, Deoksugung Palace, or Deoksu Palace, is a walled compound of palaces in Seoul that was inhabited by members of Korea's royal family during the Joseon monarchy until the annexation of Korea by Japan in 1910.

Koreans in Japan

Zainichi KoreanZainichi KoreansZainichi
In 1946, some 1,340,000 ethnic Koreans were repatriated to Korea, with 650,000 choosing to remain in Japan, where they now form the Zainichi Korean community.
The term Zainichi Korean refers only to long-term Korean residents of Japan who trace their roots to Korea under Japanese rule, distinguishing them from the later wave of Korean migrants who came mostly in the 1980s and from pre-modern immigrants dating back to antiquity who may themselves be the ancestors of the Japanese people.

Koreans

KoreanSouth KoreanKorean people
Japanese rule remains controversial in modern-day North Korea and South Korea and its negative repercussions continue to affect these countries, including the industrialization plan to solely benefit Japan, the exploitation of Korean people, the marginalization of Korean history and culture, the environmental exploitation of the Korean Peninsula, and the status of Japanese collaborators known as Chinilpa.
During the Korea under Japanese rule of 1910–1945, Koreans were often recruited and or forced into labour service to work in mainland Japan, Karafuto Prefecture (Sakhalin), and Manchukuo; the ones who chose to remain in Japan at the end of the war became known as Zainichi Koreans, while the roughly 40 thousand who were trapped in Karafuto after the Soviet invasion are typically referred to as Sakhalin Koreans.

Sakhalin Koreans

Sakhalin KoreanKarafuto KoreansKorean
The 43,000 ethnic Koreans in Karafuto, which had been occupied by the Soviet Union just prior to Japan's surrender, were refused repatriation to either mainland Japan or the Korean Peninsula, and were thus trapped in Sakhalin, stateless; they became the ancestors of the Sakhalin Koreans.
Sakhalin Koreans are Russian citizens and residents of Korean descent living on Sakhalin Island, who trace their roots to the immigrants from the Gyeongsang and Jeolla provinces of Korea during the late 1930s and early 1940s, the latter half of the Japanese colonial era.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
Joseon Korea came under the Japanese sphere of influence in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1876 and a complex coalition of the Meiji government, military, and business officials began a process of Korea's political and economic integration into Japan.
With the exception of two sillok compiled during the colonial era, the Annals are the 151st national treasure of Korea and listed in UNESCO's Memory of the World registry.

Soviet Civil Administration

Soviet Civil AuthoritySovietadministering the area north
The Division of Korea separated the Korean Peninsula under two governments and economic systems with the northern Soviet Civil Administration and the southern United States Army Military Government in Korea.

Unequal treaty

unequal treatiesunequaltreaties
In 1965, the Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and South Korea declared the unequal treaties between Japan and Korea, especially 1905 and 1910, were "already null and void" at the time of their promulgation.
Korea's unequal treaties with European states became largely null and void in 1910, when it was annexed by Japan.