Korean Buddhism

BuddhismKorean BuddhistBuddhistSeonBuddhism in KoreaKoreaKoreanBuddhistsKorean BuddhistsNorth Korea
Korean Buddhism is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism.wikipedia
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Jogye Order

JogyeJogye Order of Korean BuddhismChogye
As it now stands, Korean Buddhism consists mostly of the Seon Lineage, primarily represented by the Jogye and Taego Orders.
The Jogye Order, officially the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism is the representative order of traditional Korean Buddhism with roots that date back 1200 years to the Later Silla National Master Doui, who brought Seon (known as Zen in the West) and the practice taught by the Sixth Patriarch, Huineng, from China about 820 CE.

Taego Order

Taego
As it now stands, Korean Buddhism consists mostly of the Seon Lineage, primarily represented by the Jogye and Taego Orders.
What distinguishes the Taego Order from other forms of Korean Buddhism like the Jogye Order of Seon is that it allows ordained priests to marry, although nuns must remain celibate.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
Though it initially enjoyed wide acceptance, even being supported as the state ideology during the Goryeo period, Buddhism in Korea suffered extreme repression during the Joseon era, which lasted over five hundred years.
Buddhism was accordingly discouraged and occasionally faced persecutions by the dynasty.

Cheontae

Ch'ŏnt'aeChontae
Other sects, such as the modern revival of the Cheontae lineage, the Jingak Order (a modern esoteric sect), and the newly formed Won, have also attracted sizable followings.
Due to Uicheon's influence, it came to be a major force in the world of Goryeo Buddhism.

Mahayana

Mahayana BuddhismMahāyānaMahayana Buddhist
Korean Buddhism is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism.
Few things can be said with certainty about Mahāyāna Buddhism, especially its early Indian form, other than that the Buddhism practiced in China, Indonesia, Vietnam, Korea, Tibet, and Japan is Mahāyāna Buddhism.

Wonhyo

Wonhyo DaisaSeol Sa (Won Hyo)Wōnhyo
Another great scholar to emerge from the Silla Period was Wonhyo.
Won Hyo (617 – April 28, 686) was one of the leading thinkers, writers and commentators of the Korean Buddhist tradition.

Hwarang

Flower KnightFlower YouthHwarang warriors
Selected young men were physically and spiritually trained at Hwarangdo according to Buddhist principles regarding one's ability to defend the kingdom.
There were educational institutions as well as social clubs where members gathered for all aspects of study, originally for arts and culture as well as religious teachings stemming mainly from Korean Buddhism.

Woncheuk

Wonch'ukWonchukWŏnch'ŭk
Wonhyo's commentaries were very important in shaping the thought of the preeminent Chinese Buddhist philosopher Fazang, and Woncheuk's commentary on the Saṃdhinirmocana-sūtra had a strong influence in Tibetan Buddhism.
Woncheuk (613–696) was a Korean Buddhist monk who did most of his writing in China, though his legacy was transmitted by a disciple to Silla.

Buddhism

BuddhistBuddhistsBuddhadharma
Korean Buddhism is distinguished from other forms of Buddhism by its attempt to resolve what it sees as inconsistencies in Mahayana Buddhism.
Native Mahayana Buddhism is practised today in China, Japan, Korea, Singapore, parts of Russia and most of Vietnam (also commonly referred to as "Eastern Buddhism").

Sosurim of Goguryeo

SosurimKing SosurimGo Gu-bu
In 372, the monk Sundo (順道, pinyin: Shùndào) was sent by Fu Jian (337–385) of Former Qin to the court of the King Sosurim of Goguryeo.
In 372, he received Buddhism through travelling monks of Former Qin and built temples to house them.

Bulguksa

Bulguksa TempleBulguk TemplePulguksa
Two crowning achievements were the temple Bulguksa and the cave-retreat of Seokguram .
It is a head temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism and encompasses seven National treasures of South Korea, including the Dabotap and Seokgatap stone pagodas, Cheongun-gyo (Blue Cloud Bridge), and two gilt-bronze statues of Buddha.

Tongbulgyo

tong bulgyo
This approach is characteristic of virtually all major Korean thinkers, and has resulted in a distinct variation of Buddhism, which is called Tongbulgyo ("interpenetrated Buddhism"), a form that sought to harmonize all disputes (a principle called hwajaeng 和諍) by Korean scholars.

Haeinsa

Haeinsa TempleHae-in-saHaein Temple
Paintings of this are in the temple at Haeinsa and a stone monument honoring his martyrdom is in the National Museum of Kyongju.
It is still an active Seon practice center in modern times, and was the home temple of the influential Seon master Seongcheol, who died in 1993.

Nine mountain schools

Nine Mountains
Initially, the number of these schools was fixed at nine, and Korean Seon was then termed the "nine mountain schools" (九山 or gusan).
The nine mountain schools (九山; or gusan) were the initial monasteries of the Korean branch of Buddhism called Seon, founded in the Unified Silla period in the 8th or 9th century.

Jinul

ChinulBojo Jinul
The position that was generally adopted in the later Seon schools, due in large part to the efforts of Jinul (知訥; 1158–1210), did not claim clear superiority of Seon meditational methods, but rather declared the intrinsic unity and similarities of the Seon and Gyo viewpoints.
He is credited as the founder of the Jogye Order, by working to unify the disparate sects in Korean Buddhism into a cohesive organization.

Goryeo

Korea (Goryeo Kingdom)Goryeo DynastyKoryo
Though it initially enjoyed wide acceptance, even being supported as the state ideology during the Goryeo period, Buddhism in Korea suffered extreme repression during the Joseon era, which lasted over five hundred years.

Hwaeom

HwaomFlower Garland schoolHwaŏm
The Hwaeom school remained in the position of predominant doctrinal school up until the end of the Goryeo Dynasty, when it was placed into a forced merger with the Seon school (hangul:선종, hanja:禪宗).

Silla

Silla DynastySilla KingdomShilla
When Buddhism was introduced to Korea in the 4th century CE, the Korean peninsula was politically subdivided into three kingdoms: Goguryeo in the north (which included territory currently in Russia and China), Baekje in the southwest, and Silla in the southeast.

Baekje

PaekcheBaekje KingdomBaekjae
When Buddhism was introduced to Korea in the 4th century CE, the Korean peninsula was politically subdivided into three kingdoms: Goguryeo in the north (which included territory currently in Russia and China), Baekje in the southwest, and Silla in the southeast.

Goguryeo

KoguryoKoguryŏGoguryeo Kingdom
When Buddhism was introduced to Korea in the 4th century CE, the Korean peninsula was politically subdivided into three kingdoms: Goguryeo in the north (which included territory currently in Russia and China), Baekje in the southwest, and Silla in the southeast.

Jogyesa

Jogyesa Temple
In 1920, the Temple Ordinance was revised to reorganize temple administration and allow the Japanese government to directly oversee the 31 main temples in the country, with new headquarters at Kakwangsa (now Jogyesa).
Jogyesa is the chief temple of the Jogye Order of Korean Buddhism, becoming so in 1936.

Sangha

SamghasanghasSaṅgha
Jajang is also known for his participation in the founding of the Korean monastic sangha.
The color of modern robes varies from community to community: saffron is characteristic for Theravada groups; blue, grey or brown for Mahayana Sangha members in Vietnam, maroon in Tibetan Buddhism, grey in Korea, and black in Japan.

Naksansa

55 monks were arrested and many others were interrogated and tortured, including the abbot of Naksansa, who died from the abuses.
Naksansa or Naksan Temple is a Korean Buddhist temple complex in the Jogye order of Korean Buddhism that stands on the slopes of Naksan Mountain (also called "Obongsan Mountain").

Ichadon

In 527, however, a prominent court official named Ichadon presented himself to King Beopheung of Silla and announced he had become Buddhist.

Tripitaka Koreana

Tripiṭaka KoreanadaejanggyeongGoryeo Daejanggyeong
A significant historical event of the Goryeo period is the production of the first woodblock edition of the Tripiṭaka called the Tripitaka Koreana.
To once again implore divine assistance with combating the Mongol threat, King Gojong thereafter ordered the revision and re-creation of the Tripiṭaka; the carving began in 1237 and was completed in 12 years, with support from Choe U and his son Choe Hang, and involving monks from both the Seon and Gyo schools.