Korean Empire

KoreaEmpire of KoreaGreat Korean EmpireGreater Korean EmpireImperial KoreaJoseon13 October 1897CoreaDaehan Jegukempire
The Korean Empire (transcripted as Daehan Jeguk, ) was the last independent unified Korean state.wikipedia
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Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
Proclaimed in October 1897 by Emperor Gojong of the Joseon dynasty, the empire stood until Japan's annexation of Korea in August 1910. On August 22, 1910, the Korean Empire was annexed by Japan with the forced Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, beginning a 35-year period of Japanese colonial rule which stripped Korea's sovereignty.
The Korean Empire became a protectorate of Japan in 1905 in the Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905 and the country was indirectly ruled by the Japanese through the Resident-General of Korea.

Gwangmu Reform

1897–1910
During the Korean Empire, Emperor Gojong oversaw the Gwangmu Reform, a partial modernization and Westernization of the military, economy, land system, and education system, and of various industries.
The Gwangmu Reform (광무개혁,光武改革, Gwangmu Gaehyeok) was a chain of events that was aimed at modernizing and westernizing the Korean Empire as a late starter in the industrial revolution.

Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth Korea
The Korean Empire (transcripted as Daehan Jeguk, ) was the last independent unified Korean state.
After the First Sino-Japanese War, despite the Korean Empire's effort to modernize, the country was annexed by Japan in 1910 and ruled by it until the end of World War II in August 1945.

Empress Myeongseong

Queen MinEulmi Incidentassassinated
Queen Min (posthumously titled Empress Myeongseong), the consort of King Gojong, also recognized this change and formally established closer diplomatic relations with Russia to counter Japanese influence. With the assassination of his wife Queen Min, King Gojong and the Crown Prince (who later became Emperor Sunjong) fled to the Russian legation in 1896.
Empress Myeongseong or Empress Myung-Sung (19 October 1851 – 8 October 1895), known informally as Queen Min, was the first official wife of Gojong, the twenty-sixth king of Joseon and the first emperor of the Korean Empire.

Korean units of measurement

KoreanKŭnKorean units
The first legislation enacted by the new state was the 1897 Law on Weights and Measures standardizing Korea's various local systems of traditional weights and measures.
It is largely based on the Chinese system, with influence from Japanese standards imposed following its annexation of the Korean Empire in 1910.

Anti-Japanese sentiment in Korea

anti-Japanese sentimentanti-JapaneseAnti-Japanese sentiment in South Korea
Anti-Japanese sentiment, which had already become entrenched in the minds of commoners and aristocrats alike during the Japanese invasions of Korea (1592–98), became pervasive in the royal court and upper echelons of society following the Ganghwa Treaty of 1876 and soon extended explosively to most Koreans following perceived Japanese meddling in court politics and the assassination of Queen Min.
Japan's involvement began with the 1876 Treaty of Ganghwa during the Joseon Dynasty of Korea and increased over the following decades with the Gapsin Coup (1882), the First Sino-Japanese War (1894–95), the assassination of Empress Myeongseong at the hands of Japanese agents in 1895, the establishment of the Korean Empire (1897), the Russo-Japanese War (1904–05), the Taft–Katsura Agreement (1905), culminating with the 1905 Eulsa Treaty, removing Korean autonomous diplomatic rights, and the 1910 Annexation Treaty (both of which were eventually declared null and void by the Treaty on Basic Relations between Japan and the Republic of Korea in 1965).

Three Kingdoms of Korea

Three KingdomsThree Kingdoms periodKorea
The name, literally meaning "Great Han Empire", was derived from Samhan, specifically the Three Kingdoms of Korea (not the ancient confederacies in the southern Korean Peninsula), in the tradition of naming new states after historic states (Gubon Sincham, Hanja: 舊本新參, Hangul: 구본신참).
The "Han" in the names of the Korean Empire, Daehan Jeguk, and the Republic of Korea (South Korea), Daehan Minguk or Hanguk, are named in reference to the Three Kingdoms of Korea.

Gojong of Korea

GojongEmperor GojongKing Gojong
Proclaimed in October 1897 by Emperor Gojong of the Joseon dynasty, the empire stood until Japan's annexation of Korea in August 1910. With the assassination of his wife Queen Min, King Gojong and the Crown Prince (who later became Emperor Sunjong) fled to the Russian legation in 1896.
Gojong proclaimed the Korean Empire in October 1897 to justify the country's ending of its traditional tributary subordination to China.

Samhan

HanProtohistoricProto-historic Korea
The name, literally meaning "Great Han Empire", was derived from Samhan, specifically the Three Kingdoms of Korea (not the ancient confederacies in the southern Korean Peninsula), in the tradition of naming new states after historic states (Gubon Sincham, Hanja: 舊本新參, Hangul: 구본신참).
The "Han" in the names of the Korean Empire, Daehan Jeguk, and the Republic of Korea (South Korea), Daehan Minguk or Hanguk, are named in reference to the Three Kingdoms of Korea, not the ancient confederacies in the southern Korean Peninsula.

Japan–Korea Agreement of August 1904

Japan-Korea Protocol of August 1904First Japan–Korea Convention
On August 22, 1904, the first treaty between Japan and Korea, known as First Japan–Korea Convention, was signed.
The Japan–Korea Protocol of August 1904 was made between representatives of the Empire of Japan and the Korean Empire in 1904.

Yi Tjoune

Yi Jun Peace MuseumJun YiRi Jun
The delegation at The Hague was led by Yi Sang-seol and his deputy Yi Tjoune, Yi Wi-jong presented a diplomatic attempt to reclaim the Empire's sovereignty.
Yi Tjoune (December 18, 1859 – July 14, 1907), also known as Yi Jun, was a Korean prosecutor and diplomat.

Sunjong of Korea

SunjongEmperor SunjongEmperor Yunghui
With the assassination of his wife Queen Min, King Gojong and the Crown Prince (who later became Emperor Sunjong) fled to the Russian legation in 1896.
The Korean Empire was established in 1897, and Sunjong became the imperial crown prince.

Hangul

Chosŏn'gŭlHangeulKorean
There, he proclaimed the founding of the "Great Korean Empire", officially re-designated the national title as such, and declared the new era name Gwangmu (Hangul: 광무, Hanja: 光武) (meaning warrior of light), effectively severing Korea's superficial historic ties as a tributary of Qing China, which Korea had adhered to since the prior Manchurian invasion in 1636.
After the Gabo Reform in 1894, the Joseon Dynasty and later the Korean Empire started to write all official documents in the Korean alphabet.

First Sino-Japanese War

Sino-Japanese WarSino-Japanese War (1894-1895)Sino–Japanese War
The First Sino-Japanese War marked the rapid decline of any power the Joseon state had managed to hold against foreign interference, as the battles of the conflict itself had been fought on Korean soil and the surrounding seas.
Korea proclaimed itself the Korean Empire and announced its independence from the Qing Empire.

Joseon

Joseon DynastyJoseon (Korea)Korea
Proclaimed in October 1897 by Emperor Gojong of the Joseon dynasty, the empire stood until Japan's annexation of Korea in August 1910.
Joseon was founded by Yi Seong-gye in July 1392 and was replaced by the Korean Empire in October 1897.

House of Yi

Yi dynastyJeonju YiKorean Imperial Household
The House of Yi or Korean Imperial Household, also called the Yi Dynasty or known as Yi clan of Jeonju, is the household of Joseon and the Korean Empire, consisting of the descendants of Yi Seonggye, the founder of Joseon, known by his posthumous name, Taejo ("highest ancestor").

Korea royal refuge at the Russian legation

Russian legationKing ruling from the Russian legationfled to the Russian legation
With the assassination of his wife Queen Min, King Gojong and the Crown Prince (who later became Emperor Sunjong) fled to the Russian legation in 1896.
This may have contributed to the declaration of the Korean Empire later in 1897, affirming Korea's independence.

Gabo Reform

Gabo Reformsextensive institutional reformsGabo Reformists
These laws were called the Gabo Reform, referring to the year (1894) in which they began.
In October 1897, King Gojong decided to return to his other palace, Deoksugung, and proclaimed the founding of the Korean Empire.

Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905

Eulsa TreatyJapan-Korea Treaty of 1905Protectorate Treaty
On November 17, 1905 the Eulsa Treaty (known also as "1905 Agreement", "The Five Article Treaty" or "Second Japan-Korean Convention") was signed in Korea even before Dr. Homer Hulbert's mission entered Washington.
The Japan–Korea Treaty of 1905, also known as the Eulsa Treaty, Eulsa Unwilling Treaty or Japan–Korea Protectorate Treaty, was made between the Empire of Japan and the Korean Empire in 1905.

Namdaemun Battle

Imperial Army against Japan in Namdaemun Gate
In June 1907, the Japanese forced the Sunjong Emperor disbanded the Armed Forces of the Korean Empire.

Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910

Japan–Korea Annexation Treatyannexation of KoreaJapan-Korea Annexation Treaty
On August 22, 1910, the Korean Empire was annexed by Japan with the forced Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, beginning a 35-year period of Japanese colonial rule which stripped Korea's sovereignty.
The Japan–Korea Treaty of 1910, also known as the Japan–Korea Annexation Treaty, was made by representatives of the Empire of Japan and the Korean Empire on August 22, 1910.

Independence Gate

DongnimmunIndependence Gate (Dongnimmun)
The Independence Gate was erected at the site of the former Yeongeunmun.

Korean won

wonKRW
The Korean won was the official currency of the Korean Empire between 1902 and 1910.

Seoul

Seoul, South KoreaSeoul, KoreaHanseong
After Joseon changed her name to the Korean Empire in 1897, Hwangseong also designated Seoul.

Empire of Japan

JapaneseJapanImperial Japan
After proclaimed the founding of the Korean Empire, Korea was officially annexed in Japan through the annexation treaty in 1910.