Korean martial arts

Korean martial artKoreanKorean martial artistsindigenous Korean artsKorean martial artistKorean systemsmartial artsMudoYong Moodo
Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술, Hanja: 武術, musul or Hangul: 무예, Hanja: 武藝, muye) are fighting practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation.wikipedia
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Hapkido

and hapkidoHap Ki Dohapki-do
The best known unarmed Korean Martial Arts are Taekwondo and Hapkido, though such traditional practices such as ssireum - Korean Wrestling - and Taekkyon - Korean Foot Fighting - are rapidly gaining in popularity both inside and outside the country. These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo. Though various forms of grappling have been known in Korea for generations, Hapkido is essentially a 20th-century development, based on Japanese Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu but incorporating Korean striking techniques. Choi's practices were later renamed to Hapkido [合氣道] and students of Choi Yong Sul, such as Ji Han Jae, the late Myung Kwang-sik, the late Han Bong-soo and others helped to spread this art both inside and outside Korea.
Hapkido (,, also spelled hap ki do or hapki-do; from Korean hapgido ) is a highly eclectic Korean martial art.

Muyesinbo

Muyeshinbobonjo muye ship pal banSip Pal Ki
Soon this book was revised in the Muyejebo Seokjib and in 1759, the book was revised and published at the Muyesinbo (Hangul: 무예신보, Hanja: 武藝新譜).
The Muyesinbo (or Muyeshinbo, meaning "new compendium of martial arts") is a Korean martial arts manual published in 1759.

Muyejebo

This led to the creation of the Muyejebo (무예제보, Hanja: 武藝諸譜) in 1599 by Han Gyo, who had studied the use of several weapons with the Chinese army.
The Muyejebo (Compendium of Several Martial Arts) is the oldest extant Korean martial arts manual, written during the reign of King Seonjo (d.

Taekwondo

Tae Kwon DoTaekwon-DoTaekwando
The best known unarmed Korean Martial Arts are Taekwondo and Hapkido, though such traditional practices such as ssireum - Korean Wrestling - and Taekkyon - Korean Foot Fighting - are rapidly gaining in popularity both inside and outside the country. These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo.
Taekwondo, Tae Kwon Do or Taekwon-Do (Korean 태권도/跆拳道, English pronunciation, or ) is a Korean martial art, characterized by its emphasis on head-height kicks, jumping and spinning kicks, and fast kicking techniques.

Tang Soo Do

TangSooDoHwa Soo DoT'ang Soo Do
These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo.
Tang Soo Do (Hangul: 당수도, Hanja: 唐手道) is a karate-based Korean martial art incorporating fighting principles from subak (as described in the Kwon Bup Chong Do), as well as northern Chinese martial arts.

Kuk Sul Do

These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo.
Kuk Sul Do® is a traditional Korean martial arts style founded and trademarked by Grandmaster Choon Sik Yang .

GongKwon Yusul

These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo.
Gongkwon Yusul is a modern Korean martial art system founded by Kang Jun in 1996.

Dojang

Taekwondo has hand, kicking/leg techniques, blocks, throws, takedowns, and in some dojangs, grappling, though the latter three are practiced for self-defense purposes and their use is forbidden in competition.
Dojang is a term used in Korean martial arts, such as taekwondo, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sool Won, and hapkido, that refers to a formal training hall.

Sesok-ogye

Sae Sok O-Gye
The Buddhist influence on the Hwarang is most notably seen around 600 AD, when the moral code Sae Sok O-Gye, written by Won Gwang, was documented.
The code is still used by many Korean martial artists and can be found in gyms around the world.

Muyedobotongji

Muye Dobo TongjiChong DoComprehensive Illustrated Manual of Martial arts
Choi Young made his reputation fighting for the Mongols in northern China, putting down Han rebellions in the last days of the Yuan dynasty.) Until the publication of Muyedobotongji in 1795, archery remained a singular Korean martial art, testable during the military portion of the Gwageo (National Service Examination)

Soo Bahk Do

These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo.
Additionally, its pyong-an (Pinan) utilize many direct, linear forms similar to Shotokan Karate Kata, while the individual blocks, strikes, and techniques themselves often utilize the more circular constructions of other Korean martial arts, as influenced by Northern Chinese martial arts styles throughout history.

Song Deok-gi

The survivance of Song Deok-gi, the last Taekkyon Master of the Joseon dynasty secured the transmission of the art: Taekkyon joined the list of Important Intangible Cultural Properties of Korea No.
In 1958, he showed a demonstration of Korean martial arts in front of the president Lee Seung-man for his birthday with Kim Sung-hwan (1904?-1958), another pupil of Im Ho.

Taekkyeon

TaekkyonTaekyonTae Kyun
The best known unarmed Korean Martial Arts are Taekwondo and Hapkido, though such traditional practices such as ssireum - Korean Wrestling - and Taekkyon - Korean Foot Fighting - are rapidly gaining in popularity both inside and outside the country.
Taekkyon (other informal romanizations include Taekgyeon, Taekkyeon, or Taekyun) is a traditional Korean martial art.

Dobok

tobok
The practitioners wear a uniform or tobok with a belt or tti wrapped around it.
Dobok is the uniform worn by practitioners of Korean martial arts.

Hankido

In like manner, some variants of Hapkido such as Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do and Hankido have adopted a range of Chinese practices and execution.
Hankido aims to be a Korean martial art for and from the Korean people, accessible to everyone.

Hwa Rang Do

HwarangdoHwarang-doJoo Bang Lee
These include Tae Kwon Do, Soo Bahk Do, Tang Soo Do, Kuk Sul Do, Moo Duk Kwan, Hapkido, Choi Kwang-Do, GongKwon Yusul, Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do, and Kumdo. In like manner, some variants of Hapkido such as Kuk Sool Won, Hwa Rang Do and Hankido have adopted a range of Chinese practices and execution.

Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu

AikijujutsuaikijutsuDaito-ryu aiki-jujutsu
Though various forms of grappling have been known in Korea for generations, Hapkido is essentially a 20th-century development, based on Japanese Daitō-ryū Aiki-jūjutsu but incorporating Korean striking techniques.
Among them are: the Korean martial art of hapkido founded by Choi Yong-sool, who claims to have been trained under Takeda Sokaku; Choi gave two versions of his story, one in 1962 and another completely different one in 1982.

Myung Kwang-sik

Choi's practices were later renamed to Hapkido [合氣道] and students of Choi Yong Sul, such as Ji Han Jae, the late Myung Kwang-sik, the late Han Bong-soo and others helped to spread this art both inside and outside Korea.

Choi Yong-sool

Choi Yong SulChoi, Young SoolYong Sool Choi
The foundation for Hapkido was established by Choi Yong Sul.

Hangul

Chosŏn'gŭlHangeulKorean
Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술, Hanja: 武術, musul or Hangul: 무예, Hanja: 武藝, muye) are fighting practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation.

Hanja

HanchahanmunChinese characters
Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술, Hanja: 武術, musul or Hangul: 무예, Hanja: 武藝, muye) are fighting practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation.

History of Korea

Korean historyKoreaancient Korea
Korean martial arts (Hangul: 무술, Hanja: 武術, musul or Hangul: 무예, Hanja: 武藝, muye) are fighting practices and methods which have their place in the history of Korea but have been adapted for use by both military and non-military personnel as a method of personal growth or recreation.

Prehistory

prehistoricprehistoric timesprehistorian
The history of Korean martial arts can be traced as far back as the prehistoric era.

Koreans

KoreanSouth KoreanKorean people
The ancestors of modern Korean people migrated and settled in the Korean Peninsula as early as the 28th century BC, a geopolitical region besieged by thousands of known documented instances of foreign invasions.

Korean Peninsula

KoreapeninsulaKorean
The ancestors of modern Korean people migrated and settled in the Korean Peninsula as early as the 28th century BC, a geopolitical region besieged by thousands of known documented instances of foreign invasions.