Korean name

Korean surnameTable of Hanja for Personal Name UseKoreanKorean namesfamily namesurnamegiven nameKorean family nameKorean naming practicesKorean Personal Name
A Korean name consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people in both South Korea and North Korea.wikipedia
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Surname

family nameoccupational surnamelast name
A Korean name consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people in both South Korea and North Korea.
The latter is often called the Eastern naming order because Europeans are most familiar with the examples from the East Asian cultural sphere, specifically, China and Taiwan, Korea (Republic of Korea and Democratic People's Republic of Korea), Japan, and Vietnam.

Kim (Korean surname)

KimGimhae KimGim
Fewer than 300 (approximately 280) Korean family names were in use in 2000, and the three most common (Kim, Lee, and Park) account for nearly half of the population. In order to correct this problem, South Korea's Ministry of Culture, Sports has developed the Revised Romanization of Korean to replace the older McCune–Reischauer system in the year 2000 and now the official spelling of these three names has been changed to Gim, I and Bak.
Kim or Gim is the most common surname in Korea.

Li (surname 李)

Li
The common Korean surname, Lee (also romanized as Yi, Ri, or Rhee), and the Vietnamese surname, Lý, are both derived from Li and are historically written with the same Chinese character, 李.

Hanja

HanchahanmunChinese characters
Early names based on the Korean language were recorded in the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE), but with the growing adoption of the Chinese writing system, these were gradually replaced by names based on Chinese characters (hanja).
Korean personal names are generally based on Hanja, although some exceptions exist.

Generation name

generation poemgeneration poemsgenerational name
Many Koreans have their given names made of a generational name syllable and an individually distinct syllable, though this practice is declining in the younger generations.
This is quite common for Korean names.

Given name

néefirst namepersonal name
A Korean name consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people in both South Korea and North Korea.
Korean names and Vietnamese names are often simply conventions derived from Classical Chinese counterparts.

Chinese characters

ChineseChinese characterChinese:
Early names based on the Korean language were recorded in the Three Kingdoms period (57 BCE – 668 CE), but with the growing adoption of the Chinese writing system, these were gradually replaced by names based on Chinese characters (hanja).
Often a character not commonly used (a "rare" or "variant" character) will appear in a personal or place name in Chinese, Japanese, Korean, and Vietnamese (see Chinese name, Japanese name, Korean name, and Vietnamese name, respectively).

Bon-gwan

Korean clansKorean clanclan
The family names are subdivided into bon-gwan (clans), i.e. extended families which originate in the lineage system used in previous historical periods. According to the population and housing census of 2000 conducted by the South Korean government, there are a total of 286 surnames and 4,179 clans.

List of Korean surnames

Korean family nameList of Korean family namesfamily name
According to the population and housing census of 2000 conducted by the South Korean government, there are a total of 286 surnames and 4,179 clans.

Park (Korean surname)

ParkBakPak
Fewer than 300 (approximately 280) Korean family names were in use in 2000, and the three most common (Kim, Lee, and Park) account for nearly half of the population. In order to correct this problem, South Korea's Ministry of Culture, Sports has developed the Revised Romanization of Korean to replace the older McCune–Reischauer system in the year 2000 and now the official spelling of these three names has been changed to Gim, I and Bak.

Sino-Korean vocabulary

Sino-KoreanSino-Korean wordSino-Korean words
For a brief period after the Mongol invasion of Korea during the Goryeo dynasty, Korean kings and aristocrats had both Mongolian and Sino-Korean names.
During this time, male aristocrats changed their given names to Sino-Korean names.

Chinese name

Family nameAncestral nameChinese
The usual presentation of Korean names in English is similar to those of Chinese names and differs from those of Japanese names, where they, in English publications, are usually written in a reversed order with the family name last.
Due to China's historical dominance of East Asian culture, many names used in Korea and Vietnam are adaptations of Chinese names, or have historical roots in Chinese, with appropriate adaptation to accommodate linguistic differences.

Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code

Article 809 of the Korean Civil Code (Korean: 민법 제809조) was the codification of a traditional rule prohibiting marriage between men and women who have the same surname and ancestral home (bon-gwan).

Korea under Japanese rule

KoreaJapanese KoreaJapanese occupation
During the period of Japanese colonial rule of Korea (1910–1945), Koreans were forced to adopt Japanese-language names.
By 1939, however, this position was reversed and Japan's focus had shifted towards cultural assimilation of the Korean people; Imperial Decree 19 and 20 on Korean Civil Affairs (Sōshi-kaimei) went into effect, whereby ethnic Koreans were forced to surrender their traditional use of clan-based Korean family name system, in favor for a new surname to be used in the family register.

Jinmeiyō kanji

Jinmeiyōkanji which no longer exist in modern Japanesepersonal name characters
The use of an official list is similar to Japan's use of the jinmeiyō kanji (although the characters do not entirely coincide).
*Inmyongyong chuga hanjapyo (Korean names)

Cheonmin

cheonmin peoplecommoner statusgwanno
It was not until the Gabo Reform of 1894 that members of the outcast class were allowed to adopt a surname.
early 16th century; family name Seo), originally an Uinyeo of the cheonmin class, became the first female Royal Physician in Korean history.

Teknonymy

teknonympaedonymicTeknonyms
In addition, teknonymy, or referring to parents by their children's names, is a common practice.

Posthumous name

posthumous titleposthumouslyposthumously honoured
A complex system, including courtesy names and pen names, as well as posthumous names and childhood names, arose out of Confucian tradition.

Revised Romanization of Korean

RRRevised RomanizationRomanized
In order to correct this problem, South Korea's Ministry of Culture, Sports has developed the Revised Romanization of Korean to replace the older McCune–Reischauer system in the year 2000 and now the official spelling of these three names has been changed to Gim, I and Bak.
Like several European languages that have undergone spelling reforms (such as Portuguese, German or Swedish), the Revised Romanization is not expected to be adopted as the official romanization of Korean family names.

Seol Chong

Only a handful of figures from the Three Kingdoms period are recorded as having borne a courtesy name, such as Seol Chong.

Gongmin of Goryeo

GongminKing GongminKing Gongmin of Goryeo
For example, King Gongmin had both the Mongolian name Bayan Temür and the Sino-Korean name Wang Gi (later renamed Wang Jeon .

Japanese name

Japanese given nameJapanese surnameimina
The usual presentation of Korean names in English is similar to those of Chinese names and differs from those of Japanese names, where they, in English publications, are usually written in a reversed order with the family name last.
The standard presentation of Japanese names in English differs from the standard presentations of modern Chinese names and Korean name, which are usually not reversed to fit the western order in English, except when the person is living or traveling abroad.

Koreans

KoreanSouth KoreanKorean people
A Korean name consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people in both South Korea and North Korea.

South Korea

Republic of KoreaKoreaKOR
A Korean name consists of a family name followed by a given name, as used by the Korean people in both South Korea and North Korea.