Korean tea

traditional Korean teateatea riteschateapot and platetraditionaltraditional Korean cold drinktraditional teas and drinks
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.wikipedia
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Brown rice tea

Hyeonmi-chaHyeonmi chahyeonmicha
Bori-cha, memil-cha, and oksusu-cha are other traditional Korean teas prepared in a similar way with barley, buckwheat, and corn.

Chrysanthemum tea

chrysanthemumGukhwa-chachrysanthemum flower tea

Yulmu-cha

Job's tears teayulmu cha
* Traditional Korean tea

Leaf

leavesaxilfoliage
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Root

adventitious rootsrootsroot system
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Flower

flowersfloralflowering
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Fruit

fruitsfruitingfresh fruit
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Grain

grainsfood grainfood grains
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Edible mushroom

ediblemushroomsedibility
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Edible seaweed

seaweedseaweedssea vegetable
Korean tea is a beverage consisting of boiled water infused with leaves (such as the tea plant Camellia sinensis), roots, flowers, fruits, grains, edible mushrooms, or seaweed.

Samguk yusa

SamgungnyusaMemorabilia of the Three KingdomsSamgukyusa
According to the Record of Gaya, cited in the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, the legendary queen Heo Hwang-ok, a princess of Ayodhya, brought the Camellia sinensis (var.

Heo Hwang-ok

Hur HwangokPrincess Heo
According to the Record of Gaya, cited in the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, the legendary queen Heo Hwang-ok, a princess of Ayodhya, brought the Camellia sinensis (var.

Ayodhya

AyodhyāAyuthyaAjodhya
According to the Record of Gaya, cited in the Memorabilia of the Three Kingdoms, the legendary queen Heo Hwang-ok, a princess of Ayodhya, brought the Camellia sinensis (var.

Camellia sinensis

teatea planttea plants
assamica) tea plant from India to Korea and planted it on Baegwolsan, a mountain that borders the city of Changwon.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
assamica) tea plant from India to Korea and planted it on Baegwolsan, a mountain that borders the city of Changwon.

Korea

KoreanKorean PeninsulaSouth Korea
assamica) tea plant from India to Korea and planted it on Baegwolsan, a mountain that borders the city of Changwon.

Changwon

Changwon CityACh'angwon
assamica) tea plant from India to Korea and planted it on Baegwolsan, a mountain that borders the city of Changwon.

Rhododendron subsect. Ledum

LedumLabrador tea
In practice, however, Labrador tea and fruit teas, such as magnolia berry tea and goji berry tea, were more widely used in the Samhan Era instead.

Goji tea

goji berry teaGugija-chagugijacha
In practice, however, Labrador tea and fruit teas, such as magnolia berry tea and goji berry tea, were more widely used in the Samhan Era instead.

Samhan

HanProtohistoricProto-historic Korea
In practice, however, Labrador tea and fruit teas, such as magnolia berry tea and goji berry tea, were more widely used in the Samhan Era instead.

Hwaeomsa

Hwaeomsa Temple
Some of the earliest Buddhist temples in Korea, such as Bulgapsa, Bulhoesa, and Hwaeomsa, claim to be the birthplace of Korean tea culture.

Queen Seondeok of Silla

Queen SeondeokSeondeokDeokman
The import of Chinese tea products started during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla (631‒647), when two types of tea bricks, jeoncha and dancha, were imported from the Tang Empire.

Compressed tea

tea brickbrick teabrick of tea
The import of Chinese tea products started during the reign of Queen Seondeok of Silla (631‒647), when two types of tea bricks, jeoncha and dancha, were imported from the Tang Empire.

Gyeongdeok of Silla

King GyeongdeokGyeongdeok
In 765, a Buddhist monk is said to have presented an offering of the tea to King Gyeongdeok and the Buddha.