Krashovani

KrašovaniKrashovanCroatsKrashovans
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat.wikipedia
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Carașova

CaraşovaNermedIabalcea
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat. Krashovani, declared as Croats, form a majority in two communes of Caraș-Severin County: Carașova and Lupac.
It is known especially for its geographical placement and for the origin of its Croatian inhabitants, the Krashovani.

Banat

Serbian BanatRomanian BanatBánság
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat.
The region of Banat is populated by ethnic Romanians, Serbs, Hungarians, Germans, Krashovani, Ukrainians, Slovaks, Bulgarians, Czechs, Croats, Jews, Romani and other ethnicities.

South Slavs

South SlavicSouth SlavSlavic
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat.

Torlakian dialect

TorlakianTorlaksTorlak dialect
They are Roman Catholic by faith and speak the Torlakian dialect.
There are also smaller ethnic communities of Croats (the Krashovani) in Romania and Slavic Muslims (the Gorani) in southern Kosovo.

Lupac

ClocoticiRafnicVodnic
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat. Krashovani, declared as Croats, form a majority in two communes of Caraș-Severin County: Carașova and Lupac.
In 2002, its population numbered 3,023 people and was mostly made up of Krashovani Croats.

Croatian language

CroatianCroathr
Glottolog lists "Karashevski" as sub-type of Croatian language.
In these localities, Croats or Krashovani make up the majority of the population, and education, signage and access to public administration and the justice system are provided in Croatian, alongside Romanian.

Croats

CroatianCroatCroatians
They are regarded as and predominantly self-identify as Croats.
The subgroups of Croats are commonly based on regional affiliation, like Dalmatians, Slavonians, Zagorci, Istrani etc., while outside Croatia there exist several ethnic groups : Šokci (Croatia, Serbia, Hungary), Bunjevci (Serbia, Hungary), Burgenland Croats (Austria), Molise Croats (Italy), Croats of Boka Kotorska or Bokelji (Montenegro), Raci (Hungary), Krashovans (Romania), Janjevci (Kosovo).

Croats of Romania

CroatsBanat CroatsCroat
Most Croats in Romania are Krashovani, even though only around 200 people declared themselves Krashovani in the census, the rest declaring Croatian ethnicity.

Banat Bulgarians

Banat BulgarianBulgariansBanat Bulgarian dialect

Serbs of Romania

SerbsSerbs in RomaniaSerb
Ever since the Romanian Revolution, the government of Romania has awarded special minority status and privileges to its ethnic Serb citizens.

Romania

ROURomanianRomânia
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat.

Communes of Romania

communecommunescommunal
Krashovani, declared as Croats, form a majority in two communes of Caraș-Severin County: Carașova and Lupac.

Romani people in Romania

RomaRomaniGypsies
According to the 2002 census in Romania, the population of the Carașova commune comprised 84.60% Croats, 4.96% others, 4.47% Roma, 4.41% Romanians and others.

Romanians

Romanianethnic Romanianethnic Romanians
According to the 2002 census in Romania, the population of the Carașova commune comprised 84.60% Croats, 4.96% others, 4.47% Roma, 4.41% Romanians and others.

Bosnia (region)

BosniaBosnianBosnia proper
Their ancestors first settled Carașova in the 13th and 14th centuries from northwestern Bosnia.

Jovan Cvijić

Jovan CvijicCvijićJ. Cvijić
Serbian ethnographer Jovan Cvijić concluded that the community was "very old settlers with origin in Crna Reka who were Catholicised"; Stanko Žuljić claims that their origin is in Turopolje, in Croatia.

Turopolje

Serbian ethnographer Jovan Cvijić concluded that the community was "very old settlers with origin in Crna Reka who were Catholicised"; Stanko Žuljić claims that their origin is in Turopolje, in Croatia.

Bulgarians

BulgarianBulgarian peopleethnic Bulgarian
The Carașoveni were considered Bulgarians by some Bulgarian scientists in the first half of the 20th century (such as G. Cibrus, M. Mladenov, K. Telbizov, and T. Balkanski), partially based on their view that Torlakian-speakers are ethnically Bulgarians.

Austrian Empire

AustrianAustriaAustrians
According to the Austrian population census there were over 10,000 Carașoveni in Banat.

Austria-Hungary

Austro-Hungarian EmpireAustro-HungarianAustria–Hungary
In 1896 the Austro-Hungarian census around 7,500 Carașoveni were listed.

Kingdom of Romania

RomaniaRomanian KingdomRomanian
The same was stated by the authorities of the Kingdom of Romania in 1940.

Romanian Revolution

Romanian Revolution of 19891989 RevolutionRevolution
Ever since the Romanian Revolution, the government of Romania has awarded special minority status and privileges to its ethnic Serb citizens.

Romanian ethnic minority parties

ethnic minority political partyone seatethnic minorities parties
The Democratic Union of Serbs and Krashovani of Romania (Uniunea Democratică a Sârbilor si Carașovenilor din România) was founded in 1992.

Caraș-Severin County

Caraș-SeverinCaraş-Severin CountyCaraş-Severin
The Krashovani (Carașoveni, Krašovani) are a South Slavic community inhabiting Carașova and Lupac in the Caraș-Severin County within Romanian Banat.