Kris

keriscreesecressdouble-edged Malayan daggerIndonesian daggerKaliskris knifeKris Mpu Gandringkris or kerisKris sword
The kris (ngoko Javanese: ; krama inggil Javanese: ; ngoko: keris; krama; dhuwung; krama inggil: wangkingan, lit. "to slice"; Minangkabau: karih, Bugis and Makassarese: sele, Balinese and Sasak: keris, Jawi: کريس, Thai: กริช krit, Tagalog: kalis, Khmer: គ្រីស kris) is an asymmetrical dagger with distinctive blade-patterning achieved through alternating laminations of iron and nickelous iron (pamor).wikipedia
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Taming Sari

his weaponKeris Taming SariKris Taming Sari
Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, a sanctified heirloom (pusaka), auxiliary equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, a symbol of heroism, etc. Legendary kris that possess supernatural power and extraordinary ability were mentioned in traditional folktales, such as those of Empu Gandring, Taming Sari, and Setan Kober.
Taming Sari [ MALAY:TA-ming SA-ri ] ("flower shield" or "beautiful shield" ) is a famous kris in Malay folklore.

Kalis

kali stickskalis'' daggerMoro kris
Two notable exceptions are the Philippines where it is usually called kalis or kris (although the Filipino kalis is a sword, rather than a dagger), and Thailand where it is always spelled kris and pronounced either as kris or krit.
A kalis (Baybayin: or ; Abecedario: cáli, cális) is a type of double-edged Filipino sword, often with a "wavy" section, similar to a kris.

Pencak Silat

pencakpentjak silatsilat
Keris is also a symbol of power and of ethnic pride and in most communities making up the Malay Archipelago (currently southern Thailand, southern Philippines, Brunei, Malaysia, Singapore and Indonesia.) - home of Pencak Silat martial arts.
Local weapons were recorded as being used against the Dutch, particularly knives and edged weapons such as the golok, parang, kris and klewang.

Kris of Knaud

Currently, the Kris of Knaud is the oldest known surviving kris in the world.
The Kris of Knaud, also known as the Keris of Knaud or Knaud's Kris, is the oldest known kris surviving in the world.

Culture of Indonesia

Indonesian cultureIndonesianculture
Krises are most strongly associated with the culture of Indonesia.
Other noted Indonesian crafts are Jepara wood carving and Kris.

Thai language

ThaiThai:Central Thai
The kris (ngoko Javanese: ; krama inggil Javanese: ; ngoko: keris; krama; dhuwung; krama inggil: wangkingan, lit. "to slice"; Minangkabau: karih, Bugis and Makassarese: sele, Balinese and Sasak: keris, Jawi: کريس, Thai: กริช krit, Tagalog: kalis, Khmer: គ្រីស kris) is an asymmetrical dagger with distinctive blade-patterning achieved through alternating laminations of iron and nickelous iron (pamor).

Hang Tuah

Men usually wore only one kris but the famous admiral Hang Tuah is said in the Hikayat Hang Tuah to have armed himself with one short and one long kris.
After a brutal fight Hang Tuah emerged as winner, and then Singhavikramavardhana, the ruler of Majapahit, bestowed upon him Taming Sari’s kris or dagger.

Javanese culture

JavanesecultureJavanese tradition
As a result, in Indonesia the kris is commonly associated with Javanese culture, although other ethnicities are familiar with the weapon as part of their culture, such as the Balinese, Malays, Sundanese, Madurese, Banjar, Bugis, and Makassar.
Keris is an important item, with many heirloom kris made by master blacksmiths holding significant historical value.

Indonesia

Republic of IndonesiaIndonesianIndonesian Republic
Kris have been produced in many regions of Indonesia for centuries, but nowhere—although the island of Bali comes close—is the kris so embedded in a mutually-connected whole of ritual prescriptions and acts, ceremonies, mythical backgrounds and epic poetry as in Central Java.
Indonesia currently holds nine items of UNESCO's Intangible Cultural Heritage, including a wayang puppet theatre, kris, batik, angklung, and the three genres of traditional Balinese dance.

Forged in Fire (TV series)

Forged in FireJ. Neilson
This weapon was also featured in the American bladesmthing competition, Forged in Fire (TV series)'s season 6 episode 7.

Sukuh

Candi Sukuh
However, Raffles' (1817) study of the Candi Sukuh states that the kris recognized today came into existence around 1361 AD in the kingdom of Majapahit, East Java.
Smiths drew their powers to forge a kris from the god of fire; and a smithy is considered as a shrine.

Kujang (weapon)

kujangKujang Warrior
The Sanghyang siksakanda ng karesian canto XVII, a Sundanese manuscript dated from Saka 1440 or 1518 AD, describes the kris as the weapon of kings, while the kujang is the weapon of farmers.
The kujang, like the keris, is a blade of sentimental and spiritual value to the people of Indonesia, who have a vast belief in supernatural powers.

Pusaka

Kris are used for display, as talismans with magical powers, weapons, a sanctified heirloom (pusaka), auxiliary equipment for court soldiers, an accessory for ceremonial dress, an indicator of social status, a symbol of heroism, etc. Legendary kris that possess supernatural power and extraordinary ability were mentioned in traditional folktales, such as those of Empu Gandring, Taming Sari, and Setan Kober.
The Javanese warrior-king Pangeran Sambernyawa's keris was a pusaka so powerful that merely pointing at the distant Chinese, Dutch or other enemies, it would snatch their souls and leave them dead on the battlefield.

Silat

pesilatIndonesian martial arts, silatkontaw silat
There is also the belief that pointing a kris at someone means they will die soon, so silat practitioners precede their demonstrations by touching the points of the blades to the ground so as to neutralise this effect.
The iconic kris was patterned after the Dongson dagger.

Mpu Gandring

It describes a legendary bladesmith called Mpu Gandring or Empu Gandring and his impatient customer, Ken Arok, in the last days of the Kediri kingdom in the 13th century.
Mpu Gandring was a famous maker of kris, a type of Javanese knife.

Southeast Asia

South East AsiaSouth-East AsiaSoutheast Asian
Kris history is generally traced through the study of carvings and bas-relief panels found in Southeast Asia.
This include weaponry, such as the distinctive kris, and musical instruments, such as the gamelan.

Juramentado

juramentados
Kris-forgers and swordsmen were referred to as juramentados by the Spanish.
At the moment of attack, the mag-sabil would approach a large group of enemies, shout "La ilaha il-la'l-lahu" ("There is no god but Allah"), draw kris or barong and then rush into the group swinging his sword, killing and maiming as many victims as possible in the time he had left.

Kriss Vector

TDI VectorKriss S.VKRISS Vector .45 ACP
The name Kriss comes from a Southeast Asian dagger with a flame-shaped blade.

Majapahit

Majapahit EmpireMajapahit KingdomKing of Majapahit
However, Raffles' (1817) study of the Candi Sukuh states that the kris recognized today came into existence around 1361 AD in the kingdom of Majapahit, East Java.
Additional silk rope is looped around the waist as a belt, and the belt is inserted with one or two short blades, called pu-la-t'ou (belati or more precisely kris dagger), walking barefoot.

Ken Arok

Ken AngrokKen Angrok, RajasaKen Arok and Ken Dedes
It describes a legendary bladesmith called Mpu Gandring or Empu Gandring and his impatient customer, Ken Arok, in the last days of the Kediri kingdom in the 13th century. Another version of the tale describes that the kris passed to Ken Arok's stepson Anusapati which in turn killed his stepfather after recognized that his biological father was killed by Ken Arok with the same kris.
He managed to get this by ordering a kris from a famous smith called Mpu Gandring.

Javanese people

JavaneseJavaJavanese culture
It has become an essential and symbolic weapon to Moro culture, much as it is associated with Javanese cultures.
Javanese blacksmiths create a range of tools and farming equipment, and also cultural items such as gamelan instruments and kris.

Moro people

MoroMorosMoro Muslims
It has become an essential and symbolic weapon to Moro culture, much as it is associated with Javanese cultures.
In response, Moro volunteers with minimal weapons also group themselves with much old traditional weapons like the kris, spears and barong, such as the Blackshirts of Cotabato and the Barracudas of Lanao, began to appear and engage the Ilagas.

Anusapati

Anuśapati, Panji AnengahKing Anusapati
Another version of the tale describes that the kris passed to Ken Arok's stepson Anusapati which in turn killed his stepfather after recognized that his biological father was killed by Ken Arok with the same kris.
Tunggul Ametung, who was a resident of Singashari before it became a kingdom, was killed by Ken Arok using a cursed kris, a type of Javanese knife, forged by Mpu Gandring.

Cotabato

North CotabatoCotabato ProvinceCotabato (North)
It has also been incorporated into the historical flags of the Sultanate of Sulu, as well as the emblem of the Cotabato Province.
The guerrillas used the traditional Moro Kampilan, Barong and Kris swords.

Barong (mythology)

BarongBarong danceBarong Ket
In the Barong dance of Bali there is a segment in which the villain Rangda magically enchants Airlangga's soldiers to commit suicide while another magician makes them invulnerable to sharp objects.
Rangda cast a spell that made Airlangga's soldiers all want to kill themselves, pointing their poisoned keris into their own stomachs and chests.