Kukri

KhukuriKhukrikukri knifekukrisKukuriPhedza
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.wikipedia
179 Related Articles

Gurkha

GorkhaGurkhasGorkhas
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India. It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".
Gurkhas are closely associated with the khukuri, a forward-curving Nepali knife, and have a reputation for fearless military prowess.

Brigade of Gurkhas

GurkhasGurkha RegimentGurkha
All Gurkha troops are issued with two kukris, a Service No.1 (ceremonial) and a Service No.2 (exercise); in modern times members of the Brigade of Gurkhas receive training in its use.
They are known for their khukuri, a distinctive heavy knife with a curved blade, and have a reputation for being fierce and brave soldiers.

Gorkha regiments (India)

Gorkha RiflesGorkhaGorkha regiment
It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".
During the North African campaign, the German Afrikakorps accorded respect to the Nepalese knife khukri-wielding Gorkhas.

Dracula

novelCarfax AbbeyCount Dracula
It gained literary attention in the 1897 novel Dracula by Irish author Bram Stoker.
After dispatching many Gypsies who were sworn to protect the Count, Harker shears Dracula through the throat with a kukri knife, while the mortally wounded Quincey stabs the Count in the heart with a Bowie knife.

Chindits

ChinditOperation Thursday3rd Indian Infantry Division
Elsewhere during the Second World War, the kukri was purchased and used by other British, Commonwealth and US troops training in India, including the Chindits and Merrill's Marauders.
This included a personal weapon, such as the SMLE rifle or Sten Gun, ammunition, grenades, a machete or Gurkha kukri knife, seven days' rations, groundsheet, change of uniform and other assorted items.

Royal Gurkha Rifles

The Royal Gurkha Rifles2nd Battalion, Royal Gurkha Rifles2nd Battalion, The Royal Gurkha Rifles
It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".

Merrill's Marauders

5307th Composite Unit (Provisional)5307th Composite Unit5307th Composite Unit (provisional) "Merrill's Marauders
Elsewhere during the Second World War, the kukri was purchased and used by other British, Commonwealth and US troops training in India, including the Chindits and Merrill's Marauders.
Officers and men were equipped with U.S. HBT cotton OD uniforms, M-1943 fatigues, Type II field shoes (with or without canvas leggings), jungle boots, canvas load-bearing equipment, blanket (one-half tent or "shelter-half" per man), poncho, and a machete or kukri for brush clearing.

Gorkha Kingdom

GorkhaGorkhaliNepal
The kukri came to be known to the Western world when the East India Company came into conflict with the growing Gorkha Kingdom, culminating in the Gurkha War of 1814–1816.
This time the Chinese army came to Tibet's defence and advanced close to Kathmandu but couldn't achieve success due to strong counterattack with Khukuri.

Bowie knife

Bowie knivesBowieBowie Hunter
Despite the popular image of Dracula having a stake driven through his heart at the conclusion of a climactic battle between Dracula's bodyguards and the heroes, Mina's narrative describes his throat being sliced through by Jonathan Harker's kukri and his heart pierced by Quincey Morris's Bowie knife.
Despite the popular image of Count Dracula having a stake driven through his heart at the conclusion of the story, Dracula is actually killed by his heart being pierced by Quincey Morris's Bowie knife and his throat being sliced by Jonathan Harker's kukri knife.

Bhojpur, Nepal

BhojpurBhojpur MunicipalityBhojpur, Nepal Municipality
Khukuris made in locations like Chainpur, Bhojpur, and Dhankuta in Eastern Nepal are excellent and ornate knives.
Bhojpur bazaar is famous for its metalwork, particularly khukuri knives.

Kami (caste)

KamialsoKamis
The Biswakarma Kami (caste) are the traditional inheritors of the art of kukri-making.
The Kami make the famous Khukuri knives used by the Gurkha Army, and a traditional Nepali drum called a Madal.

Bishnu Shrestha

On 2 September 2010, Bishnu Shrestha, a retired Indian Army Gurkha soldier, alone and armed only with a khukri, defeated thirty bandits who attacked a passenger train he was on in India.
He pulled out the large, curved kukri knife that all Gurkha soldiers carry and attacked the bandits.

Fuller (weapon)

fullerfullersfullered
To reduce weight while keeping strength, the blade might be hollow forged, or a fuller is created.
The Nepali kukri has a terminology of its own, including the "aunlo bal" (finger of strength/force/energy), a relatively deep and narrow fuller near the spine of the blade, which runs (at most) between the handle and the corner of the blade, and the "chirra", which may refer either to shallow fullers in the belly of the blade or a hollow grind of the edge, and of which two or three may be used on each side of the blade.

Spring steel

SAE 1095springySAE 1075
Modern kukri blades are often forged from spring steel, sometimes collected from recycled truck suspension units.

Kopis

sai
The kopis is often compared to the contemporary Iberian falcata and the more recent, and shorter, Nepalese kukri.

Amar Singh Thapa

Bada KajiBadakaji Amar Singh Thapa
There is Khukuri named after Gorkhali General Amar Singh Thapa called Amar Singh Thapa Khukuri.
There is a Khukuri sword named after him called Amar Singh Thapa Khukuri.

Indian subcontinent

IndiasubcontinentIndian
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.

Nepali language

NepaliNepaleseKhas language
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.

Nepal

Federal Democratic Republic of NepalNepaleseNepali
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.

India

IndianRepublic of IndiaIND
The kukri or khukuri (खुकुरी khukuri) is a knife, originating from the Indian subcontinent, associated with the Nepali speaking Gurkhas of Nepal and India.

Nepalese Army

Nepal ArmyRoyal Nepalese ArmyNepali Army
It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".

British Army

ArmyBritishBritish troops
It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".

Assam Rifles

The Assam Rifles20th Battalion, Assam Rifles2nd Assam Rifles
It is a characteristic weapon of the Nepalese Army, the Royal Gurkha Rifles of the British Army, the Assam Rifles, the Assam Regiment, the Garhwal Rifles, the Gorkha regiments of the Indian Army, and of all Gurkha regiments throughout the world, so much so that some English-speakers refer to the weapon as a "Gurkha blade" or "Gurkha knife".