Kunlun (mythology)

KunlunKunlun MountainMount KunlunKunlun MountainsKunlun Mountain (mythology)mythical Kunlun MountainK'un-Lunmythical KunlunFive Elements MountainHoly Mountain of K'un-lun
The Kunlun or Kunlun Shan is a mountain or mountain range in Chinese mythology, an important symbol representing the axis mundi and divinity.wikipedia
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Axis mundi

world pillarmoundNavel of the World
The Kunlun or Kunlun Shan is a mountain or mountain range in Chinese mythology, an important symbol representing the axis mundi and divinity.
Mount Kunlun fills a similar role in China.

Chinese mythology

ChineseChinese legendmythology
The Kunlun or Kunlun Shan is a mountain or mountain range in Chinese mythology, an important symbol representing the axis mundi and divinity.
Kunlun was pictured as having a mountain or mountain range, Kunlun Mountain where dwelt various divinities, grew fabulous plants, home to exotic animals, and various deities and immortals (today there is a real mountain or range named Kunlun, as there has in the past, however the identity has shifted further west over time).

Hundun

chaotic entity in Chinese mythologyWonton
The term "Kunlun" may be semantically related to two other terms: Hundun, which is sometimes personified as a living creature; and kongdong, according to Kristofer Schipper.
Hundun has a graphic variant hunlun (using lún see the Liezi below), which etymologically connects to the mountain name Kunlun (differentiated with the "mountain radical" 山).

Langgan

Elixir of Langgan Efflorescencelanggan huadan
Peaches are (and have been) often associated with Xiwangmu The langgan was a tree of fairy gems in colours of blue or green, which was reported to grow on Kunlun in the classic books of the Zhou and early Han dynasties.
It is also the name of a mythological langgan tree of immortality found in the western paradise of Kunlun Mountain, and the name of the classic waidan alchemical elixir of immortality langgan huadan 琅玕華丹 "Elixir Efflorescence of Langgan".

Moving Sands

Although not originally located on Kunlun, but rather on a Jade Mountain neighboring to the north (and west of the Moving Sands), Xiwangmu, the Queen Mother of Meng Hao in the West, in later accounts was relocated to a palace protected by golden ramparts, within which immortals (xian) feasted on bear paws, monkey lips, and the livers of dragons, served at the edge of the Lake of Gems.
In his poem "Li Sao", author Qu Yuan describes an aerial crossing of the Moving (or Flowing) Sands on a shamanic spiritual Journey to Kunlun.

Red River (mythology)

Red River
Four rivers were sometimes said to flow out of Kunlun Mountain: the Red River (Chishui, 赤水), the Yellow River, the Black River (黑水, black water), and the Yang River (Yang 2005: 161).
The Red River is one of the mythological rivers said to flow from Kunlun, a mythological land, with mountainous features.

Weak River (mythology)

Weak River
This Weak River at the base of Kunlun flowed with a liquid so lacking in density that not even a feather could float upon it.
The Weak River is one of the mythological rivers flowing near Kunlun, home of a Western Paradise.

Yu Shi

ChisongziMaster RedpineChi Song
During the reign of Shennong, a certain Chisongzi (Master Red Pine) performed a rain-making ceremony which successfully ended a terrible drought, leading to his promotion to "Yu Shi", "Master of Rain".
According to certain versions, a certain Chisongzi during the reign of Shennong ended a severe drought by sprinkling water from an earthen bowl and was rewarded by being made the Lord of Rain with a dwelling on the mythical Kunlun Mountain.

Qingniao

Qing Niaogreen birds
Besides the cranes (traditionally thought of as the mounts or the transformations of immortals), other birds come and go from the mountain, flying errands for Xiwangmu: these blue (or green) birds are her qingniao.
(Sometimes these birds are called "crows".) The Qingniao are an important motif and frequently depicted in myths regarding Xi Wangmu and her Western Paradise, which is generally located on the mythical Kunlun Mountain.

Jade Mountain (mythology)

Jade MountainYushan
Although not originally located on Kunlun, but rather on a Jade Mountain neighboring to the north (and west of the Moving Sands), Xiwangmu, the Queen Mother of Meng Hao in the West, in later accounts was relocated to a palace protected by golden ramparts, within which immortals (xian) feasted on bear paws, monkey lips, and the livers of dragons, served at the edge of the Lake of Gems.

Tale of King Mu, Son of Heaven

Mu Tianzi ZhuanTale of King Mu
Among other literature, Kunlun Mountain appears in Fengshen Yanyi, Legend of the White Snake, the Tale of King Mu, Son of Heaven, Kunlun Nu, Zhen Hun (also known as Guardian) and Journey to the West (also known as Monkey).
He determined to visit the Western heavenly paradise of the Queen Mother of the West on the Kunlun and taste her Peaches of Immortality.

Eight Pillars

eight mountain pillars
The eight mountain pillars include Kunlun, Jade Mountain, Mount Buzhou, and five more (Yang Lihui 2005: passim).

Xian (Taoism)

xianimmortalimmortals
Although not originally located on Kunlun, but rather on a Jade Mountain neighboring to the north (and west of the Moving Sands), Xiwangmu, the Queen Mother of Meng Hao in the West, in later accounts was relocated to a palace protected by golden ramparts, within which immortals (xian) feasted on bear paws, monkey lips, and the livers of dragons, served at the edge of the Lake of Gems. Poetic descriptions tend to lavish Kunlun with paradisaical detail: gem-like rocks and towering cliffs of jasper and jade, exotic jeweled plants, bizarrely formed and colored magical fungi, and numerous birds and other animals, together with humans who have become immortal beings.

Li Sao

LisaoSaoChu ''sao
Two examples of those who overcame were Sun Wukong (Journey to the West) or Qu Yuan in his poem ("Li Sao"), both already on the path to immortality, one as a god and the other as a poet. Kunlun Mountain is a subject of poetic allusion from the ancient poems "Li Sao" and "Heavenly Questions" by Qu Yuan, through frequent mentions in the medieval Tang dynasty poetry, and, in the twentieth century in Mao Zedong's 1935 poem "Kunlun".

Features of the Marvel Universe

Muir IslandAtlantisM'Kraan Crystal
The term, written as K'un-Lun, is also used in the story of the Iron Fist in Marvel Comics as one of the seven Capital Cities of Heaven in the Marvel Universe that only appears on Earth periodically.

Queen Mother of the West

Xi WangmuXiwangmuQueen Mother
The Queen Mother of the West usually is depicted holding court within her palace on the mythological Mount Kunlun, usually supposed to be in western China (a modern Mount Kunlun is named after this).

Poetry of Mao Zedong

Snowhis poetryA poem
Kunlun Mountain is a subject of poetic allusion from the ancient poems "Li Sao" and "Heavenly Questions" by Qu Yuan, through frequent mentions in the medieval Tang dynasty poetry, and, in the twentieth century in Mao Zedong's 1935 poem "Kunlun".
According to Chinese folklore they (or a different, mythological mythical Kunlun Mountain) were once the residence of a number of gods.

Neijing Tu

The head shows Kunlun Mountains, upper dantian "cinnabar field", Laozi, Bodhidharma, and two circles for the eyes (labelled "sun" and "moon").

Peaches of Immortality

peach of immortalitypeach tree of immortalitya peach tree offering immortality