Kyoto

KyōtoKyoto, JapanKyoto CityHeian-kyōMiyakoCity of KyotoImperial PalaceKyôtoKyōto cityKyōto-shi
Kyoto, officially Kyoto City, is the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture, located in the Kansai region of Japan.wikipedia
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Kyoto Prefecture

KyotoKyōtoKyoto-fu
Kyoto, officially Kyoto City, is the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture, located in the Kansai region of Japan.
Its capital is the city of Kyoto.

Capital of Japan

capitalJapanese capitalcapitals
It is best known in Japanese history for being the former Imperial capital of Japan for more than one thousand years, as well as a major part of the Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe metropolitan area.
From 794 through 1868, the Emperor lived in Heian-kyō, modern-day Kyoto.

Tokyo

Tokyo, JapanTokyo MetropolisTōkyō
After the city of Edo was renamed Tokyo (東京, meaning "Eastern Capital") in 1868, and the seat of the Emperor was moved there, Kyoto was for a short time known as Saikyō (西京, meaning "Western Capital"). Although military rulers established their governments either in Kyoto (Muromachi shogunate) or in other cities such as Kamakura (Kamakura shogunate) and Edo (Tokugawa shogunate), Kyoto remained Japan's capital until the transfer of the imperial court to Tokyo in 1869 at the time of the Imperial Restoration.
It became the capital after Emperor Meiji moved his seat to the city from Kyoto in 1868; at that time Edo was renamed Tokyo.

Shimogamo Shrine

Kamo Mioya Shrine (Shimogamo Shrine)Kamo-mioya jinjaKamomioya-jinja
Ample archaeological evidence suggests human settlement in Kyoto began as early as the Paleolithic period, although not much published material is retained about human activity in the area before the 6th century, around which time the Shimogamo Shrine is believed to have been established.
Shimogamo Shrine in Japanese, is the common name of an important Shinto sanctuary in the Shimogamo district of Kyoto city's Sakyō ward.

Heian period

Japan (Heian period)HeianHeian-period
The new city, Heian-kyō, a scaled replica of the then Tang capital Chang'an, became the seat of Japan's imperial court in 794, beginning the Heian period of Japanese history.
The period is named after the capital city of Heian-kyō, or modern Kyōto.

History of Japan

feudal JapanJapanese historyJapan
The new city, Heian-kyō, a scaled replica of the then Tang capital Chang'an, became the seat of Japan's imperial court in 794, beginning the Heian period of Japanese history.
In 794, a new imperial capital was established at Heian-kyō (modern Kyoto), marking the beginning of the Heian period, which lasted until 1185.

Yamashiro Province

YamashiroJōshūYamashiro no kuni
His last choice for the site was the village of Uda, in the Kadono district of Yamashiro Province.
Yamashiro Province included Kyoto itself, as in 794 AD Yamashiro became the seat of the imperial court, and, during the Muromachi period, was the seat of the Ashikaga shogunate as well.

Japan

🇯🇵JPNJapanese
Kyoto, officially Kyoto City, is the capital city of Kyoto Prefecture, located in the Kansai region of Japan.
In 784, Emperor Kanmu moved the capital from Nara to Nagaoka-kyō, then to Heian-kyō (modern Kyoto) in 794.

Edo

YedoEdo cityEdo Honmachi
After the city of Edo was renamed Tokyo (東京, meaning "Eastern Capital") in 1868, and the seat of the Emperor was moved there, Kyoto was for a short time known as Saikyō (西京, meaning "Western Capital"). Although military rulers established their governments either in Kyoto (Muromachi shogunate) or in other cities such as Kamakura (Kamakura shogunate) and Edo (Tokugawa shogunate), Kyoto remained Japan's capital until the transfer of the imperial court to Tokyo in 1869 at the time of the Imperial Restoration.
From the establishment of the Tokugawa bakufu headquarters at Edo, the town became the de facto capital and center of political power, although Kyoto remained the formal capital of the country.

Nara, Nara

NaraNara CityNara, Japan
During the 8th century, when powerful Buddhist clergy became involved in the affairs of the Imperial government, Emperor Kanmu chose to relocate the capital in order to distance it from the clerical establishment in Nara.
During 710 CE - 784 CE, Nara was the capital of Japan, and the Emperor lived there before moving the capital to Kyoto.

Kyoto Protocol

Climate Change-Kyoto ProtocolKyotoKyoto treaty
In 1997, Kyoto hosted the conference that resulted in the protocol on greenhouse gas emissions.
The Kyoto Protocol is an international treaty which extends the 1992 United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) that commits state parties to reduce greenhouse gas emissions, based on the scientific consensus that (part one) global warming is occurring and (part two) it is extremely likely that human-made CO 2 emissions have predominantly caused it. The Kyoto Protocol was adopted in Kyoto, Japan on 11 December 1997 and entered into force on 16 February 2005.

Ashikaga shogunate

AshikagaAshikaga shōgunShōgun
Although military rulers established their governments either in Kyoto (Muromachi shogunate) or in other cities such as Kamakura (Kamakura shogunate) and Edo (Tokugawa shogunate), Kyoto remained Japan's capital until the transfer of the imperial court to Tokyo in 1869 at the time of the Imperial Restoration.
It gets its name from the Muromachi district of Kyoto.

Osaka

ŌsakaOsaka, JapanOsaka City
Throughout the Edo period, the economy of the city flourished as one of three major cities in Japan, the others being Osaka and Edo.
By the end of the Nara period, Naniwa's seaport roles had been gradually taken over by neighboring areas, but it remained a lively center of river, channel, and land transportation between Heian-kyō (Kyoto today) and other destinations.

Keihanshin

OsakaOsaka-Kobe-Kyoto Metropolitan AreaGreater Osaka
It is best known in Japanese history for being the former Imperial capital of Japan for more than one thousand years, as well as a major part of the Kyoto-Osaka-Kobe metropolitan area.
Keihanshin is a metropolitan region in Japan encompassing the metropolitan areas of the cities of Kyoto in Kyoto Prefecture, Osaka in Osaka Prefecture and Kobe in Hyōgo Prefecture.

Machiya

domaMachiya Townhousesminka
As a result, the Imperial City (Emeritus) of Kyoto is one of the few Japanese cities that still have an abundance of prewar buildings, such as the traditional townhouses known as machiya.
Machiya are traditional wooden townhouses found throughout Japan and typified in the historical capital of Kyoto.

Kuge

court noblecourt nobilitycourtier
Battles between samurai factions spilled into the streets, and came to involve the court nobility (kuge) and religious factions as well.
The kuge was a Japanese aristocratic class that dominated the Japanese imperial court in Kyoto.

Kinmon incident

Hamaguri rebellion
The Hamaguri rebellion of 1864 burnt down 28,000 houses in the city which showed the rebels' dissatisfaction towards the Tokugawa Shogunate.
The Kinmon incident, also known as the Hamaguri Gate Rebellion, was a rebellion against the Tokugawa shogunate that took place on August 20, 1864, near the Imperial Palace in Kyoto.

Lake Biwa Canal

Fushimi inclined plane on Biwako canalLake Biwa Lock and Tunnel
The construction of Lake Biwa Canal in 1890 was one measure taken to revive the city.
Lake Biwa Canal (琵琶湖疏水 or 琵琶湖疎水) is a waterway in Japan constructed during the Meiji Period to transport water, freight, and passengers from Lake Biwa to the nearby City of Kyoto.

Heian Palace

DairiDaïriImperial Palace
The Imperial Palace faced south, resulting in Ukyō (the right sector of the capital) being on the west while Sakyō (the left sector) is on the east.
The Heian Palace or Daidairi was the original imperial palace of Heian-kyō (present-day Kyoto), the capital of Japan, from 794 to 1227.

Kobe

KōbeKobe, JapanKobe City
In the pre-war years, Kyoto traded places with Kobe and Nagoya ranking as the 4th and 5th largest city.
With a population around 1.5 million, the city is part of the Keihanshin metropolitan area along with Osaka and Kyoto.

Teramachi Street

Teramachi
Teramachi Street in central Kyoto is a Buddhist temple quarter where Hideyoshi gathered temples in the city.
Teramachi Street is a historical street in Kyoto, Japan, running north-south.

Chang'an

ChanganDaxingchengnortheast sector
The new city, Heian-kyō, a scaled replica of the then Tang capital Chang'an, became the seat of Japan's imperial court in 794, beginning the Heian period of Japanese history.
The Japanese built their ancient capitals, Heijō-kyō (today's Nara) and later Heian-kyō or Kyoto, modelled after Chang'an in a more modest scale yet was never fortified.

Nakagyō-ku, Kyoto

Nakagyō-kuNakagyo-kuNakagyō
The streets in the modern-day wards of Nakagyō, Shimogyō, and Kamigyō-ku still follow a grid pattern. The line has following stations, from north to south: Kokusaikaikan (terminal) and Matsugasaki in Sakyō-ku; Kitayama and Kitaōji in Kita-ku; Kuramaguchi and Imadegawa in Kamigyō-ku; Marutamachi and Karasuma Oike in Nakagyō-ku; Shijō, Gojō and Kyōto in Shimogyō-ku; Kujō and Jūjō in Minami-ku; and Kuinabashi and Takeda (terminal) in Fushimi-ku.
Nakagyō-ku is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.

Fushimi-ku, Kyoto

Fushimi-kuFushimiFushimi ward
The line has following stations, from north to south: Kokusaikaikan (terminal) and Matsugasaki in Sakyō-ku; Kitayama and Kitaōji in Kita-ku; Kuramaguchi and Imadegawa in Kamigyō-ku; Marutamachi and Karasuma Oike in Nakagyō-ku; Shijō, Gojō and Kyōto in Shimogyō-ku; Kujō and Jūjō in Minami-ku; and Kuinabashi and Takeda (terminal) in Fushimi-ku.
Fushimi is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.

Sakyō-ku, Kyoto

Sakyō-kuSakyōSakyo-ku
The line has following stations, from north to south: Kokusaikaikan (terminal) and Matsugasaki in Sakyō-ku; Kitayama and Kitaōji in Kita-ku; Kuramaguchi and Imadegawa in Kamigyō-ku; Marutamachi and Karasuma Oike in Nakagyō-ku; Shijō, Gojō and Kyōto in Shimogyō-ku; Kujō and Jūjō in Minami-ku; and Kuinabashi and Takeda (terminal) in Fushimi-ku.
Sakyō-ku is one of the eleven wards in the city of Kyoto, in Kyoto Prefecture, Japan.