Kyuzo Mifune

Mifune KyūzōCanon of JudoKyūzō MifuneMifune
Kyuzo Mifune has been categorized as one of the greatest exponents of the art of judo after the founder, Kanō Jigorō.wikipedia
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Judo

judokayukojūdōka
Kyuzo Mifune has been categorized as one of the greatest exponents of the art of judo after the founder, Kanō Jigorō.

Kuji, Iwate

KujiKuji BayKuji City
Mifune was born on April 21, 1883, in Kuji City, Iwate Prefecture, on Honshū Island in Japan, a year after the Kodokan was founded.

Kanō Jigorō

Jigoro KanoKano JigoroJigorō Kanō
Kyuzo Mifune has been categorized as one of the greatest exponents of the art of judo after the founder, Kanō Jigorō.

Kodokan Judo Institute

KodokanKōdōkanKodokan Institute
Mifune was born on April 21, 1883, in Kuji City, Iwate Prefecture, on Honshū Island in Japan, a year after the Kodokan was founded. Trevor Leggett, a frequent visitor to the Kodokan over many years, remarked that judo was much 'rougher' at the Kodokan prior to World War II than afterward; this was, perhaps, the influence of Mifune.

The Canon of Judo

Canon Of JudoTawara-Jime
Mifune was given the title of Hanshi then Meijin by the International Martial Arts Federation (IMAF) and In 1956, he wrote his classic book, The Canon Of Judo, still a remarkable exposition of judo history, philosophy, and technical description.
The Canon of Judo is a book that was originally published in 1956, and written by Kodokan 10th dan, Kyuzo Mifune (1883-1965).

Order of the Rising Sun

Grand Cordon of the Order of the Rising SunOrder of the Rising Sun, 4th Class, Gold Rays with RosetteOrder of the Rising Sun, Gold Rays with Neck Ribbon
In 1964 Mifune was awarded the Order of the Rising Sun (3rd Class).

Iwate Prefecture

IwateIwate, JapanIwate-ken
Mifune was born on April 21, 1883, in Kuji City, Iwate Prefecture, on Honshū Island in Japan, a year after the Kodokan was founded.

Honshu

HonshūHonshu IslandHonshu, Japan
Mifune was born on April 21, 1883, in Kuji City, Iwate Prefecture, on Honshū Island in Japan, a year after the Kodokan was founded.

Sendai

Sendai, MiyagiSendai, JapanSendai City
When Mifune was 13 years old, his father, a strict disciplinarian who finally gave up on the youngest of his seven children, sent the boy to a junior high school at Sendai, in northern Japan.

Waseda University

WasedaWaseda Memorial HallUniversity of Waseda
After graduation, Mifune was sent to a Tokyo preparatory school, anticipating entry into Waseda University.

Keio University

KeioKeiō UniversityKeio Gijuku
He was able to sell it at a substantial profit, and entered the economics program at Keio University.

Shodan (rank)

shodanFirst Dan1st dan
After 15 months of training, Mifune achieved the rank of shodan ('beginning dan,' indicating 1st dan ranking) in Kodokan judo, and after the remarkably short time of four more months, nidan (2nd dan).

Dan (rank)

dandan ranknidan
After 15 months of training, Mifune achieved the rank of shodan ('beginning dan,' indicating 1st dan ranking) in Kodokan judo, and after the remarkably short time of four more months, nidan (2nd dan).

Sumi otoshi

Mifune, 5' 2" tall and 100 lb., finally slammed the wrestler with his trademark 'airplane' throw (kuki nage or sumi otoshi). He ate sparingly, slept on a Western-style bed, and did not smoke. In 1931, Kano promoted Mifune to 8th Dan (hachidan) and in 1937 to the rank of kudan (9th dan).

Ernest John Harrison

E.J. HarrisonE. J. HarrisonEJ Harrison
To E. J. Harrison, he wrote a book foreword that was simple but expressed Mifune's philosophical nature: "Freedom in continuous change!" In his book The Fighting Spirit of Japan (published in 1913), E.J. Harrison writes about an anecdote as told to him by Sakujiro Yokoyama:

Trevor Leggett

Trevor Leggett, a frequent visitor to the Kodokan over many years, remarked that judo was much 'rougher' at the Kodokan prior to World War II than afterward; this was, perhaps, the influence of Mifune.

Tokyo

Tokyo, JapanTokyo MetropolisTōkyō
Mifune died on January 27, 1965, in the Nichidai University Hospital in Tokyo.

Yokoyama Sakujiro

Sakujiro YokoyamaSakujirō YokoyamaNakamura Hansuke
In his book The Fighting Spirit of Japan (published in 1913), E.J. Harrison writes about an anecdote as told to him by Sakujiro Yokoyama:

Ashi-Hishigi

ashi hishigi
Ashi-Hishigi also called an Achilles lock or simply an ankle lock, is a technique described in both The Canon Of Judo by Kyuzo Mifune and Brazilian Jiu-Jitsu, Theory and Technique by Renzo Gracie and Royler Gracie as well as demonstrated in the video, The Essence Of Judo.

List of judoka

10th danfifteen Japanese mengreatest judoka of all time

Gogoplata

Hell's GateGogoplata (Hell's Gate)
In the film The Essence of Judo, judoka Kyuzo Mifune demonstrated a movement entitled hasami-jime, not to be confused with the gi choke also called hasami-jime, where he applied the choke while transitioning from the bottom of the kami-shiho-gatame position.

Turtle flip over

turtle turnover
Turtle Flip Over is a turtle turnover demonstrated in The Essence Of Judo by Kyuzo Mifune, and it is an unnamed technique described in The Canon Of Judo.

Jon Bluming

Kyokushin Budokai
It was there where he came in contact with the Asian martial arts, witnessing a judo exhibition by Kyuzo Mifune at the Kodokan school in March 1953.

Sanpo Toku

He was one of the school's biggest names along with future 10th dan Shotaro Tabata and Kyuzo Mifune, the latter prompting a public rivalry in which they were known as "Waza no Mifune" and "Oni no Toku" .

Tama Guruma

Tama Guruma is a throwing technique described in The Canon of Judo as a reference technique and demonstrated by Kyuzo Mifune in the video, The Essence of Judo.