La Chinoise

La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris.wikipedia
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Anne Wiazemsky

The five members are Véronique (Anne Wiazemsky), Guillaume (Jean-Pierre Léaud), Yvonne (Juliet Berto), Henri (Michel Semeniako) and Kirilov (Lex de Bruijin).
She made her cinema debut at the age of 18, playing Marie, the lead character in Robert Bresson's Au Hasard Balthazar (1966), and went on to appear in several of Jean-Luc Godard's films, among them La Chinoise (1967), Week End (1967), and One Plus One (1968).

Political cinema

politicalpolitical filmpolitical thriller
La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris.

Juliet Berto

The five members are Véronique (Anne Wiazemsky), Guillaume (Jean-Pierre Léaud), Yvonne (Juliet Berto), Henri (Michel Semeniako) and Kirilov (Lex de Bruijin).
A member of the same loose group of student radicals as Anne Wiazemsky, she first appeared in Jean-Luc Godard's Two or Three Things I Know About Her, and would go on to appear in many of Godard's subsequent films, including La Chinoise, Week End, Le Gai Savoir, and Vladimir et Rosa.

Jean-Luc Godard

GodardJean Luc GodardGodardian
La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris.
La Chinoise (1967) saw Godard at his most politically forthright so far.

Two or Three Things I Know About Her

2 ou 3 choses que je sais d'elle2 or 3 Things I Know About HerDeux Ou Trois Choses Que Je Sais D'elle
Yvonne is a girl from the country who occasionally works as a prostitute for extra money to purchase consumer goods (much like Juliette Janson, the principal character in Godard's previous film, Two or Three Things I Know About Her).
Like the other two (Week End and La Chinoise), it is considered both socially and stylistically radical.

Jean-Pierre Léaud

Jean-Pierre Leaud
The five members are Véronique (Anne Wiazemsky), Guillaume (Jean-Pierre Léaud), Yvonne (Juliet Berto), Henri (Michel Semeniako) and Kirilov (Lex de Bruijin).

Nicholas Ray

Nick RayNicolas RayRay
Henri is eventually expelled from the group for his apparent backsliding Soviet revisionism, comically suggested by his defense of the 1954 Nicholas Ray movie Johnny Guitar.

Johnny Guitar

Henri is eventually expelled from the group for his apparent backsliding Soviet revisionism, comically suggested by his defense of the 1954 Nicholas Ray movie Johnny Guitar.

Francis Jeanson

Jeanson
On the train ride en route to the planned assassination, Véronique is engaged in a discussion with the political philosopher, Francis Jeanson (Jeanson was actually Anne Wiazemsky's philosophy professor at the Paris X University Nanterre during 1966–67; a few years earlier, he had once been a communist and the head of a network which supported the Algerian national liberation movement.
* La Chinoise, by Jean-Luc Godard, 1967 (Jeanson plays his own role in a discussion with Anne Wiazemsky)

Paris Nanterre University

Paris West University Nanterre La DéfenseUniversity of NanterreParis X University Nanterre
On the train ride en route to the planned assassination, Véronique is engaged in a discussion with the political philosopher, Francis Jeanson (Jeanson was actually Anne Wiazemsky's philosophy professor at the Paris X University Nanterre during 1966–67; a few years earlier, he had once been a communist and the head of a network which supported the Algerian national liberation movement.

Jean-Pierre Gorin

J. P. Gorin
By 1968 he had switched to an overtly-political phase of revolutionary Maoist-collectivist didactic films with Jean-Pierre Gorin and the Dziga Vertov Group, which lasted for the next six years until 1973.
Godard relied on some of his discussions with Gorin while writing the script of 1967's La Chinoise.

English language

EnglishEnglish-languageen
La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris.

Paris

Paris, FranceParísParisian
La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris.

Fyodor Dostoevsky

Fyodor DostoyevskyDostoyevskyDostoevsky
La Chinoise is a loose adaptation of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's 1872 novel Demons.

Demons (Dostoevsky novel)

DemonsThe PossessedThe Devils
La Chinoise is a loose adaptation of Fyodor Dostoyevsky's 1872 novel Demons.

Maoism

MaoistMaoistsMao Zedong Thought
La Chinoise, ou plutôt à la Chinoise: un film en train de se faire (English: The Chinese, or, rather, in the Chinese manner: a film in the making), commonly referred to simply as La Chinoise, is a 1967 French political film directed by Jean-Luc Godard about a group of young Maoists in Paris. The film, set in contemporary Paris and largely taking place in a small apartment, is structured as a series of personal and ideological dialogues dramatizing the interactions of five French university students — three young men and two young women — belonging to a radical Maoist group called the "Aden Arabie Cell" (named for the novel, Aden, Arabie, by Paul Nizan).

Paul Nizan

Nizan
The film, set in contemporary Paris and largely taking place in a small apartment, is structured as a series of personal and ideological dialogues dramatizing the interactions of five French university students — three young men and two young women — belonging to a radical Maoist group called the "Aden Arabie Cell" (named for the novel, Aden, Arabie, by Paul Nizan).

Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

GoetheJohann Wolfgang GoetheJohann von Goethe
The two main characters, Véronique and Guillaume Meister (the latter named after the titular hero of Goethe's famous 1795 bildungsroman Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship), discuss the issue of revolutionary violence and the necessity of political assassination to achieve revolutionary goals.

Bildungsroman

coming-of-age novelcoming of age novelcoming-of-age
The two main characters, Véronique and Guillaume Meister (the latter named after the titular hero of Goethe's famous 1795 bildungsroman Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship), discuss the issue of revolutionary violence and the necessity of political assassination to achieve revolutionary goals.

Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship

Wilhelm Meisters LehrjahreWilhelm MeisterMignon
The two main characters, Véronique and Guillaume Meister (the latter named after the titular hero of Goethe's famous 1795 bildungsroman Wilhelm Meister's Apprenticeship), discuss the issue of revolutionary violence and the necessity of political assassination to achieve revolutionary goals.

American imperialism

American EmpireUS imperialismU.S. imperialism
Yvonne does most of the housecleaning in the apartment and, together with Guillaume, she acts out satirical political skits protesting American imperialism in general, and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson's Vietnam policy in particular.

Lyndon B. Johnson

Lyndon JohnsonJohnsonLyndon Baines Johnson
Yvonne does most of the housecleaning in the apartment and, together with Guillaume, she acts out satirical political skits protesting American imperialism in general, and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson's Vietnam policy in particular.

Vietnam War

Vietnamwar in VietnamSecond Indochina War
Yvonne does most of the housecleaning in the apartment and, together with Guillaume, she acts out satirical political skits protesting American imperialism in general, and U.S. President Lyndon Johnson's Vietnam policy in particular.

Ministry of Culture (Soviet Union)

Minister of CultureMinistry of CultureMinister of Culture of the Soviet Union
Véronique then leaves the apartment alone and sets off for what will prove to be a botched attempt to kill the Minister of Culture of the Soviet Union during his official diplomatic visit to France.