La Vita Nuova

Vita NuovaThe New LifeVita NovaLa Vita Nova
La Vita Nuova (Italian for "The New Life") or Vita Nova (Latin title) is a text by Dante Alighieri published in 1294.wikipedia
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Dante Alighieri

DanteDante’sDantean
La Vita Nuova (Italian for "The New Life") or Vita Nova (Latin title) is a text by Dante Alighieri published in 1294.
He would even write in the Tuscan dialect for works such as The New Life (1295) and the Divine Comedy; this highly unorthodox choice set a precedent that important later Italian writers such as Petrarch and Boccaccio would follow.

Sonnet

sonnetsEnglish sonnetItalian sonnet
La Vita Nuova contains 42 brief chapters (31 for Guglielmo Gorni) with commentaries on 25 sonnets, one ballata, and four canzoni; one canzone is left unfinished, interrupted by the death of Beatrice Portinari, Dante's lifelong love.
Most Sonnets in Dante's La Vita Nuova are Petrarchan.

Beatrice Portinari

BeatriceBéatriceBeatricean
La Vita Nuova contains 42 brief chapters (31 for Guglielmo Gorni) with commentaries on 25 sonnets, one ballata, and four canzoni; one canzone is left unfinished, interrupted by the death of Beatrice Portinari, Dante's lifelong love.
Beatrice "Bice" di Folco Portinari (, 1265 – 8 June 1290) was an Italian woman who has been commonly identified as the principal inspiration for Dante Alighieri's Vita Nuova, and is also commonly identified with the Beatrice who appears as one of his guides in the Divine Comedy (La Divina Commedia) in the last book, Paradiso, and in the last four canti of Purgatorio.

Prosimetrum

prosimetricprosimetricalballad-stories
It is an expression of the medieval genre of courtly love in a prosimetrum style, a combination of both prose and verse. La Vita Nuova is a prosimetrum, a piece containing both verse and prose, in the vein of Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy.

Divine Comedy

The Divine ComedyInfernoDivina Commedia
La Vita Nuova is helpful for understanding the context of his other works, principally La Commedia.
Beatrice was a Florentine woman he had met in childhood and admired from afar in the mode of the then-fashionable courtly love tradition, which is highlighted in Dante's earlier work La Vita Nuova.

Dante Gabriel Rossetti

RossettiDante RossettiD. G. Rossetti
The Henry Holiday painting Dante meets Beatrice at Ponte Santa Trinita (1883) is inspired by La Vita Nuova, as was Dante Gabriel Rossetti's The Salutation of Beatrice (1859).
For many years, Rossetti worked on English translations of Italian poetry including Dante Alighieri's La Vita Nuova (published as The Early Italian Poets in 1861).

Dante and Beatrice (painting)

Dante and BeatriceDante meets Beatrice at Ponte Santa Trinita
The Henry Holiday painting Dante meets Beatrice at Ponte Santa Trinita (1883) is inspired by La Vita Nuova, as was Dante Gabriel Rossetti's The Salutation of Beatrice (1859).
It is based on Dante's autobiographical work La Vita Nuova which describes his love for Beatrice Portinari.

Vide Cor Meum

In the film Hannibal, Dr. Hannibal Lecter and Inspector Pazzi see an outdoor opera in Florence based on Dante's La Vita Nuova, called Vide Cor Meum.
Vide cor meum (See my heart) is an aria composed by Irish composer Patrick Cassidy based on Dante Alighieri's Vita Nova, specifically on the sonnet A ciascun'alma presa, third chapter.

Latent Image (Star Trek: Voyager)

Latent ImageLatent Image" (''Star Trek: Voyager'')
A modified version of the opening line of the work's Introduction was used on the television show Star Trek: Voyager in the episode "Latent Image" (1999).
In the final scene, the Doctor reads from La Vita Nuova.

Monna Vanna (painting)

Monna VannaMonna Vanna'' (painting)
Rossetti translated the work into English in 1848 and used the character name Monna Vanna from it as a title for his 1866 painting Monna Vanna.
The new title derived from Monna Vanna ("Vain Woman"), a character in chapter XXIV of one of Rossetti's favourite books, La Vita Nuova by his namesake Dante Alighieri.

Italian language

ItalianItalian-languageit
La Vita Nuova (Italian for "The New Life") or Vita Nova (Latin title) is a text by Dante Alighieri published in 1294. Besides its content, it is notable for being written in Tuscan vernacular, rather than Latin; Dante's work helped to establish the Tuscan dialect as the basis for the written Italian language.

Courtly love

courtlinesslovepoetry
It is an expression of the medieval genre of courtly love in a prosimetrum style, a combination of both prose and verse.

Tuscan dialect

TuscanTuscan languageTuscan vernacular
Besides its content, it is notable for being written in Tuscan vernacular, rather than Latin; Dante's work helped to establish the Tuscan dialect as the basis for the written Italian language.

Frederick II, Holy Roman Emperor

Frederick IIEmperor Frederick IIFrederick II of Hohenstaufen
The prose creates the illusion of narrative continuity between the poems; it is Dante's way of reconstructing himself and his art in terms of his evolving sense of the limitations of courtly love (the system of ritualized love and art that Dante and his poet-friends inherited from the Provençal poets, the Sicilian poets of the court of Frederick II, and the Tuscan poets before them).

Boethius

Anicius Manlius Severinus BoethiusBoëthiusBoetius
La Vita Nuova is a prosimetrum, a piece containing both verse and prose, in the vein of Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy.

The Consolation of Philosophy

Consolation of PhilosophyDe consolatione philosophiaeDe Consolatione Philosophiæ
La Vita Nuova is a prosimetrum, a piece containing both verse and prose, in the vein of Boethius' Consolation of Philosophy.

Ballata

ballateBallade
La Vita Nuova contains 42 brief chapters (31 for Guglielmo Gorni) with commentaries on 25 sonnets, one ballata, and four canzoni; one canzone is left unfinished, interrupted by the death of Beatrice Portinari, Dante's lifelong love.

Canzone

canzonicanzonacanzuni
La Vita Nuova contains 42 brief chapters (31 for Guglielmo Gorni) with commentaries on 25 sonnets, one ballata, and four canzoni; one canzone is left unfinished, interrupted by the death of Beatrice Portinari, Dante's lifelong love.

Frame story

framing deviceframe narrativeframe tale
The poems present a frame story, recounting Dante's love of Beatrice from his first sight of her (when he was nine and she eight) all the way to his mourning after her death, and his determination to write of her "that which has never been written of any woman."

Latin

Latin languageLat.la
Besides its content, it is notable for being written in Tuscan vernacular, rather than Latin; Dante's work helped to establish the Tuscan dialect as the basis for the written Italian language.

Augustine of Hippo

AugustineSt. AugustineSaint Augustine
Though the result is a landmark in the development of emotional autobiography (the most important advance since Saint Augustine's Confessions in the 5th century), like all medieval literature it is far removed from the modern autobiographical impulse.

Confessions (Augustine)

ConfessionsThe ConfessionsConfessiones
Though the result is a landmark in the development of emotional autobiography (the most important advance since Saint Augustine's Confessions in the 5th century), like all medieval literature it is far removed from the modern autobiographical impulse.

Wallace Stevens

Stevens[Wallace] StevensStevens, Wallace
American poet Wallace Stevens called the text "one of the great documents of Christianity," and noting that the text displays the influence of Christianity in promulgating "the distinctly feminine virtues in place of the sterner ideals of antiquity."

Henry Holiday

The Henry Holiday painting Dante meets Beatrice at Ponte Santa Trinita (1883) is inspired by La Vita Nuova, as was Dante Gabriel Rossetti's The Salutation of Beatrice (1859).

Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari

Wolf-FerrariWolf FerrariWolf-Ferrari, Ermanno
La vita nuova is a 1902 cantata based on the text by Ermanno Wolf-Ferrari.