Laconophilia

LaconophileLaconism or LaconophiliaAncient Laconophiliahis admirationlaconistLaconizingmany other AtheniansPhilodorianpro-Spartan
Laconophilia (also known as Laconism) is love or admiration of Sparta and of the Spartan culture or constitution.wikipedia
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Sparta

LacedaemonSpartanLacedaemonians
Laconophilia (also known as Laconism) is love or admiration of Sparta and of the Spartan culture or constitution.
The admiration of Sparta is known as Laconism or Laconophilia.

Thirty Tyrants

Thirtythe Thirty30 tyrants
A group of extreme Laconising oligarchs, known as the Thirty Tyrants, seized power in Athens in 404 BC and held it for eleven months, assisted by a Spartan army.
The Thirty Tyrants (, hoi triákonta týrannoi) were a pro-Spartan oligarchy installed in Athens after its defeat in the Peloponnesian War in 404 BCE.

Cimon

KimonCimon of AthensCimon/Kimon
Some, like Cimon, son of Miltiades, believed that Athens should ally with Sparta against the Persian Empire. Cimon persuaded the Athenians to send soldiers to aid Sparta, when the helots (serfs of the Spartans) revolted and fortified Mount Ithome.
For this participation in pro-Spartan policy, he has often been called a laconist.

Laconic phrase

laconiclaconic humourLaconic wit
Admirers of the Spartans typically praise their valour and success in war, their "laconic" austerity and self-restraint, their aristocratic and virtuous ways, the stable order of their political life, and their constitution, with its tripartite mixed government.
Socrates was known to have admired Spartan laws, as did many other Athenians, but modern scholars have doubted the seriousness of his attribution of a secret love of philosophy to Spartans.

Karl Otfried Müller

Otfried MüllerMüllerK. O. Müller
A new element was introduced into Laconophilia by Karl Otfried Müller, who linked Spartan ideals to the supposed racial superiority of the Dorians, the ethnic sub-group of the Greeks to which the Spartans belonged.
Karl Otfried Müller (Carolus Mullerus; 28 August 1797 – 1 August 1840) was a German scholar and Philodorian, or admirer of ancient Sparta, who introduced the modern study of Greek mythology.

Dorians

DorianDoricDorian Greeks
A new element was introduced into Laconophilia by Karl Otfried Müller, who linked Spartan ideals to the supposed racial superiority of the Dorians, the ethnic sub-group of the Greeks to which the Spartans belonged.
Also, according to E.N. Tigerstedt, nineteenth-century European admirers of virtues they considered "Dorian" identified themselves as "Laconophile" and found responsive parallels in the culture of their day as well; their biases contribute to the traditional modern interpretation of "Dorians".

Socrates

SocraticSokratesSocrate
Some of the young men who followed Socrates had been Laconophiles.
In the play, Socrates is ridiculed for his dirtiness, which is associated with the Laconizing fad; also in plays by Callias, Eupolis, and Telecleides.

Paul Cartledge

Cartledge, PaulCartledge, P.
Cartledge's field of study is Athens and Sparta in the Classical Age; he has been described as a Laconophile.

Battle of Thermopylae

Thermopylae300 SpartansEpitaph of Simonides
Modern Laconophilia has been present in popular culture, particularly with reference to the Battle of Thermopylae, as portrayed in films such as The 300 Spartans.
After the battle, Spartan culture became an inspiration and object of emulation, a phenomenon known as Laconophilia.

Laconia

ancient LaconiaLakoniaLacedaemonia
The term derives from Laconia, the part of the Peloponnesus where the Spartans lived.

Peloponnese

PeloponnesusPeloponnesianPeloponnesos
The term derives from Laconia, the part of the Peloponnesus where the Spartans lived.

Aristocracy (class)

aristocrataristocraticaristocrats
Admirers of the Spartans typically praise their valour and success in war, their "laconic" austerity and self-restraint, their aristocratic and virtuous ways, the stable order of their political life, and their constitution, with its tripartite mixed government.

Virtue

virtuesvirtuouspurity
Admirers of the Spartans typically praise their valour and success in war, their "laconic" austerity and self-restraint, their aristocratic and virtuous ways, the stable order of their political life, and their constitution, with its tripartite mixed government.

Eunomia

Eunomia (goddess)stable order
Admirers of the Spartans typically praise their valour and success in war, their "laconic" austerity and self-restraint, their aristocratic and virtuous ways, the stable order of their political life, and their constitution, with its tripartite mixed government.

Mixed government

Mixedmixed constitutionmixed monarchy
Admirers of the Spartans typically praise their valour and success in war, their "laconic" austerity and self-restraint, their aristocratic and virtuous ways, the stable order of their political life, and their constitution, with its tripartite mixed government.

Renaissance

the RenaissanceEarly RenaissanceEuropean Renaissance
Praise of the Spartan city-state persisted within classical literature ever afterward, and surfaced again during the Renaissance.

Greco-Persian Wars

Persian WarsPersian WarGreco-Persian War
In ancient Athens, Laconism began as a current of thought and feeling after the Persian Wars.

Miltiades

Miltiades the YoungerMilitiades the YoungerMiltiades II
Some, like Cimon, son of Miltiades, believed that Athens should ally with Sparta against the Persian Empire.

Persian Empire

PersianPersiaPersians
Some, like Cimon, son of Miltiades, believed that Athens should ally with Sparta against the Persian Empire.

Ithome

Mount IthomeIthomiMt. Ithome
Cimon persuaded the Athenians to send soldiers to aid Sparta, when the helots (serfs of the Spartans) revolted and fortified Mount Ithome.

Perioeci

perioikoiperioicicperioikic
The Spartans sent the Athenians home again with thanks, lest democratic Athenian ideas influence the helots or the perioeci.

Open society

open societiesClosed Societyclosed societies
Some Athenians, especially those who disliked commerce, preferred a closed society and the rule of the few.

Spartiate

SpartiatesSpartanSpartans
Some even went so far as to imitate Spartan manners by going around Athens long-haired and unwashed, like the Spartiates.

Battle of Leuctra

Leuctraannihilated Spartan supremacy at LeuctraBattle of Leuktra
In 371 BC, the Spartans were defeated in the Battle of Leuctra.

Messenia

MessiniaMessenianMessenia Prefecture
As a result of that defeat, Sparta's allies revolted and the helots of Messenia were freed.