Lacrimal sac

dacrocystographytear sacnasolacrimal sac
The lacrimal sac or lachrymal sac is the upper dilated end of the nasolacrimal duct, and is lodged in a deep groove formed by the lacrimal bone and frontal process of the maxilla.wikipedia
52 Related Articles

Nasolacrimal duct

tear ducttear ductsduct
The lacrimal sac or lachrymal sac is the upper dilated end of the nasolacrimal duct, and is lodged in a deep groove formed by the lacrimal bone and frontal process of the maxilla.
The nasolacrimal duct (also called the tear duct) carries tears from the lacrimal sac of the eye into the nasal cavity.

Lacrimal bone

lacrimallacrimalslacrimal bones
The lacrimal sac or lachrymal sac is the upper dilated end of the nasolacrimal duct, and is lodged in a deep groove formed by the lacrimal bone and frontal process of the maxilla.
The upper part of this fossa lodges the lacrimal sac, the lower part, the nasolacrimal duct.

Orbicularis oculi muscle

orbicularis oculiorbicularis musclemuscle of Riolan
Its superficial surface is covered by a fibrous expansion derived from the medial palpebral ligament, and its deep surface is crossed by the lacrimal part of the orbicularis oculi, which is attached to the crest on the lacrimal bone.
The lacrimal orbicularis facilitates the tear pump into the lacrimal sac.

Medial palpebral ligament

medial
Its superficial surface is covered by a fibrous expansion derived from the medial palpebral ligament, and its deep surface is crossed by the lacrimal part of the orbicularis oculi, which is attached to the crest on the lacrimal bone.
Crossing the lacrimal sac, it divides into two parts, upper and lower, each attached to the medial end of the corresponding tarsus.

Frontal process of maxilla

frontal process of the maxillaanterior processfrontal process
The lacrimal sac or lachrymal sac is the upper dilated end of the nasolacrimal duct, and is lodged in a deep groove formed by the lacrimal bone and frontal process of the maxilla.
The upper border articulates with the frontal bone and the anterior with the nasal; the posterior border is thick, and hollowed into a groove, which is continuous below with the lacrimal groove on the nasal surface of the body: by the articulation of the medial margin of the groove with the anterior border of the lacrimal a corresponding groove on the lacrimal is brought into continuity, and together they form the lacrimal fossa for the lodgement of the lacrimal sac.

Lacrimal canaliculi

lacrimal ductlacrimal ductstear duct
It connects the lacrimal canaliculi, which drain tears from the eye's surface, and the nasolacrimal duct, which conveys this fluid into the nasal cavity.
The superior duct, the smaller and shorter of the two, at first ascends, then bends at an acute angle, and passes medialward and downward to the lacrimal sac.

Lacrimal apparatus

lacrimal systemlacrimallachrymal passages
*Lacrimal apparatus
The lacrimal canaliculi, the lacrimal sac, and the nasolacrimal duct, by which the fluid is conveyed into the cavity of the nose, emptying anterioinferiorly to the inferior nasal conchae from the nasolacrimal duct;

Angular artery

angular
On the cheek it distributes branches which anastomose with the infraorbital; after supplying the lacrimal sac and orbicularis oculi, it ends by anastomosing with the dorsal nasal branch of the ophthalmic artery.

Stratified columnar epithelium

stratified columnarinterspersed columnar cellsstratified epithelia
Like the nasolacrimal duct, the sac is lined by stratified columnar epithelium with mucus-secreting goblet cells, with surrounding connective tissue.

Goblet cell

goblet cellsglandular epithelial cellsgoblet
Like the nasolacrimal duct, the sac is lined by stratified columnar epithelium with mucus-secreting goblet cells, with surrounding connective tissue.

Radiocontrast agent

radiocontrastcontrastcontrast agent
The lacrimal sac can be imaged by dacrocystography, in which radiocontrast is injected, followed by X-ray imaging.

Radiography

radiographradiographicradiographs
The lacrimal sac can be imaged by dacrocystography, in which radiocontrast is injected, followed by X-ray imaging.

Dacryocystitis

dacrocystitisinfected
Dacryocystitis is an infection of the lacrimal sac, secondary to obstruction of the nasolacrimal duct at the junction of lacrimal sac.

Arterial tree

arterial branchesdistal descending aorta
twig to the upper part of lacrimal sac

Lacrimal gland

lacrimal glandslacrimaltear glands
The lacrimal gland produces tears which then flow into canals that connect to the lacrimal sac.

Mucoepidermoid carcinoma

carcinoma, mucoepidermoidmucoepidermoid tumor
Mucoepidermoid carcinoma can also be found in other organs, such as bronchi, lacrimal sac, and thyroid gland.

Dorsal nasal artery

dorsal nasal branchnasal artery
It emerges from the orbit above the medial palpebral ligament, and, after giving a twig to the upper part of the lacrimal sac, divides into two branches.

Posterior lacrimal crest

posterior crest
The upper part of this fossa lodges the lacrimal sac, the lower part, the nasolacrimal duct.

Body orifice

orificeorificesbody openings
The nasolacrimal ducts, to carry tears from the lacrimal sac into the nasal cavity

Inferior ophthalmic vein

inferiorinferior ophthalmicinferior ophthalmic veins
The inferior ophthalmic vein begins in a venous network at the forepart of the floor and medial wall of the orbit; it receives some vorticose veins and other veins from the inferior rectus muscle, inferior oblique muscle, lacrimal sac and eyelids, runs backward in the lower part of the orbit lying above the inferior rectus and divides into two branches.

Tears

lacrimationteartear film
Lacrimal fluid gathers in the lacrimal lake, and is drawn into the puncta by capillary action, then flows through the lacrimal canaliculi at the inner corner of the eyelids entering the lacrimal sac, then on to the nasolacrimal duct, and finally into the nasal cavity.

Lacrimal punctum

punctapuncta lacrimalialacrimal puncta
The fluid is conveyed through the lacrimal canaliculi to the lacrimal sac, and thence via the nasolacrimal duct to the inferior nasal meatus of the nasal passage.

Johanson–Blizzard syndrome

These include: ectodermal mid-line scalp defects with sparse, oddly-patterned hair growth; aplasia cutis (underdeveloped, very thin skin) over the head, an enlarged fontanelle ("soft spot" on the head of young infants), microcephaly (undersized skull), prominent forehead, absence of eyebrows and eyelashes, mongoloidal eye shape, nasolacrimo-cutaneous fistulae (this refers to the formation of an abnormal secondary passageway from either the tear duct or lacrimal sac to the facial skin surface, possibly discharging fluid), flattened ears, micrognathism of the maxilla and mandible (underdevelopment of the upper and lower jaw, respectively), with the maxilla more prominently affected in some cases; congenital clefting of bones surrounding the optical orbit (eye socket), such as the frontal and lacrimal bone; and maldeveloped deciduous teeth ("baby teeth"), with an absence of permanent teeth.