Lady Jane Grey

JaneQueen JaneJane GreyGray, Lady JaneJane GrayJeanne GreyNorthumberland Rebelliontitle character
Lady Jane Grey (c. 1537 – 12 February 1554), also known as Lady Jane Dudley (after her marriage) and as "the Nine Days' Queen", was an English noblewoman and de facto Queen of England and Ireland from 10 July until 19 July 1553.wikipedia
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Lord Guildford Dudley

GuildfordGuildford DudleyGuilford
In May 1553, she married Lord Guildford Dudley, a younger son of Edward's chief minister John Dudley, Duke of Northumberland. Nothing came of this, however, and Jane was not engaged until the spring of 1553, her bridegroom being Lord Guildford Dudley, a younger son of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland.
Lord Guildford Dudley (also spelt Guilford) (c. 1535 – 12 February 1554) was the teenage husband of Lady Jane Grey.

Edward VI of England

Edward VIKing Edward VIEdward
Jane was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII through his younger daughter Mary, and was a first cousin once removed of Edward VI. Jane had two younger sisters, Lady Catherine and Lady Mary; through their mother, the three sisters were great-granddaughters of Henry VII, grandnieces of Henry VIII, and first cousins once removed of Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I.
Edward named his first cousin once removed, Lady Jane Grey, as his heir, excluding his half-sisters, Mary and Elizabeth.

Mary Tudor, Queen of France

Mary TudorMaryPrincess Mary
Jane was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII through his younger daughter Mary, and was a first cousin once removed of Edward VI.
Mary's second marriage produced four children, and through her eldest daughter Frances, Mary was the maternal grandmother of Lady Jane Grey, who was the de facto monarch of England for nine days in July 1553.

Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk

Duke of SuffolkHenry Grey, 3rd Marquess of DorsetHenry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, 3rd Marquess of Dorset
However, Jane soon became viewed as a threat to the Crown when her father, Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, got involved with Wyatt's rebellion against Queen Mary's intention to marry Philip II of Spain.
He was the father of Lady Jane Grey, known as "the Nine Days' Queen".

Lady Katherine Grey

CatherineLady CatherineCatherine, Lady Herbert of Cardiff
Jane had two younger sisters, Lady Catherine and Lady Mary; through their mother, the three sisters were great-granddaughters of Henry VII, grandnieces of Henry VIII, and first cousins once removed of Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I. On 25 May 1553, the couple were married at Durham House in a triple wedding, in which Jane's sister Catherine was matched with the heir of the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Herbert, and another Katherine, Lord Guildford's sister, with Henry Hastings, the Earl of Huntingdon's heir.
Katherine Seymour, Countess of Hertford (25 August 1540 – 26 January 1568), born Lady Katherine Grey, was the younger sister of Lady Jane Grey.

Elizabeth I of England

Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth IQueen Elizabeth
Jane had two younger sisters, Lady Catherine and Lady Mary; through their mother, the three sisters were great-granddaughters of Henry VII, grandnieces of Henry VIII, and first cousins once removed of Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I. The will named his half-sisters Mary and Elizabeth illegitimate and removed them from the succession, subverting their claims under the Third Succession Act.
Her half-brother, Edward VI, ruled until his death in 1553, bequeathing the crown to Lady Jane Grey and ignoring the claims of his two half-sisters, Elizabeth and the Roman Catholic Mary, in spite of statute law to the contrary.

Lady Mary Grey

Mary GreyLady MaryMary
Jane had two younger sisters, Lady Catherine and Lady Mary; through their mother, the three sisters were great-granddaughters of Henry VII, grandnieces of Henry VIII, and first cousins once removed of Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I.
Mary had two sisters, Lady Jane Grey and Lady Katherine Grey.

John Aylmer (bishop)

John AylmerBishop AylmerBishop John Aylmer
Jane received a humanist education, studying Latin, Greek and Hebrew with John Aylmer, and Italian with Michelangelo Florio.
About 1541 he was made chaplain to the duke, and tutor of Greek to his daughter, Lady Jane Grey.

John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland

Duke of NorthumberlandJohn DudleyEarl of Warwick
Nothing came of this, however, and Jane was not engaged until the spring of 1553, her bridegroom being Lord Guildford Dudley, a younger son of John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland.
John Dudley, 1st Duke of Northumberland (1504 – 22 August 1553) was an English general, admiral, and politician, who led the government of the young King Edward VI from 1550 until 1553, and unsuccessfully tried to install Lady Jane Grey on the English throne after the King's death.

Wyatt's rebellion

rebellionthe rebellionThomas Wyatt
However, Jane soon became viewed as a threat to the Crown when her father, Henry Grey, 1st Duke of Suffolk, got involved with Wyatt's rebellion against Queen Mary's intention to marry Philip II of Spain.
He was later tried and beheaded, as were his daughter Lady Jane Grey, and her husband Lord Guilford Dudley, both still in prison since the failed attempt to put Lady Jane on the throne and neither of whom were involved in the uprising.

Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset

Edward SeymourEarl of HertfordDuke of Somerset
Seymour's brother, the Lord Protector, Edward Seymour, 1st Duke of Somerset, felt threatened by Thomas' popularity with the young King Edward.
In April 1547, using Edward's support to circumvent Somerset's opposition, Thomas Seymour secretly married Henry VIII's widow Catherine Parr, whose Protestant household included the 11-year-old Lady Jane Grey and the 13-year-old Princess Elizabeth.

Tower of London

Towerthe TowerThe Tower of London
After Edward's death, Jane was proclaimed queen on 10 July 1553 and awaited coronation in the Tower of London.
Before the 20th century, there had been seven executions within the castle on Tower Green; as was the case with Lady Jane Grey, this was reserved for prisoners for whom public execution was considered dangerous.

William Herbert, 1st Earl of Pembroke (died 1570)

William Herbert, 1st Earl of PembrokeEarl of PembrokeSir William Herbert
On 25 May 1553, the couple were married at Durham House in a triple wedding, in which Jane's sister Catherine was matched with the heir of the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Herbert, and another Katherine, Lord Guildford's sister, with Henry Hastings, the Earl of Huntingdon's heir.
After the death of Edward VI, Herbert initially supported Lady Jane Grey's claim to the throne.

Henry VII of England

Henry VIIKing Henry VIIHenry Tudor
Jane was the great-granddaughter of Henry VII through his younger daughter Mary, and was a first cousin once removed of Edward VI. Jane had two younger sisters, Lady Catherine and Lady Mary; through their mother, the three sisters were great-granddaughters of Henry VII, grandnieces of Henry VIII, and first cousins once removed of Edward VI, Mary I and Elizabeth I.

Third Succession Act

Act of Succession 1543actAct of Succession 1544
The will named his half-sisters Mary and Elizabeth illegitimate and removed them from the succession, subverting their claims under the Third Succession Act.
Edward VI meant to bypass this Act in his "Devise for the Succession", issued as letters patent on 21 June 1553, by naming Lady Jane Grey as his successor in place of Mary.

Henry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon

Henry HastingsEarl of HuntingdonHenry Hastings, 3rd Earl of Huntingdon, 5th Baron Hastings, 8th Baron of Botreaux
On 25 May 1553, the couple were married at Durham House in a triple wedding, in which Jane's sister Catherine was matched with the heir of the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Herbert, and another Katherine, Lord Guildford's sister, with Henry Hastings, the Earl of Huntingdon's heir.
In 1553, Edward VI was dying and his appointed heir was his cousin Lady Jane Grey, Northumberland's daughter-in-law.

Durham House, London

Durham HouseDurham Place
On 25 May 1553, the couple were married at Durham House in a triple wedding, in which Jane's sister Catherine was matched with the heir of the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Herbert, and another Katherine, Lord Guildford's sister, with Henry Hastings, the Earl of Huntingdon's heir.
Mary's predecessor, Lady Jane Grey, the "Nine Days" Queen of England, was married at Durham House on May 21 or 25, 1553 to Guilford Dudley.

Roger Ascham

AschamAscham, Roger
To the visiting scholar Roger Ascham, who found her reading Plato, she is said to have complained:
It was on his way to join Morrison that he paid visit to Lady Jane Grey at Bradgate, where he found her reading Plato's Phaedo while every one else was out hunting.

Catherine Parr

Katherine ParrCatherineQueen Catherine Parr
In early February 1547, Jane was sent to live in the household of Edward VI's uncle, Thomas Seymour, who soon married Henry VIII's widow, Catherine Parr.
In early 1548, Catherine invited Lady Elizabeth and her cousin, Lady Jane Grey, to stay in the couple's household at Sudeley Castle in Gloucestershire.

Michelangelo Florio

Florio, Michelangelo (1515–1572)
Jane received a humanist education, studying Latin, Greek and Hebrew with John Aylmer, and Italian with Michelangelo Florio.
He also served as secretary to Cecil, and as Lady Jane Grey's chaplain, teaching her both Italian and Latin.

Duke of Clarence

ClarenceDuchess of ClarenceDukedom of Clarence
She would agree only to make him Duke of Clarence.
A fourth creation in England was suggested and planned to take effect; the title of Duke of Clarence was going to be given to Lord Guilford Dudley, husband of Lady Jane Grey, upon her coronation, as she declined to make her husband king consort.

Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel

Earl of ArundelThe Earl of ArundelHenry FitzAlan, Earl of Arundel
Rather, it seems that Henry FitzAlan, 19th Earl of Arundel—whom Northumberland had arrested and detained twice as an ally of Somerset, before rehabilitating—engineered a coup d'etat in the Privy Council in Northumberland's absence.
King Edward's health was seriously declining, and on 21 June 1553 Arundel was among those who signed Edward's letters patent which conferred the succession on Lady Jane Grey.

Guildhall, London

GuildhallLondon Guildhallthe Guildhall
Their trial, by a special commission, took place on 13 November 1553, at Guildhall in the City of London.
Trials in this hall have included those of Anne Askew (Protestant martyr), Henry Howard, Earl of Surrey, Sir Nicholas Throckmorton, Lady Jane Grey, Guildford Dudley, Francis Dereham and Thomas Culpeper (lovers of Catherine Howard), Thomas Cranmer, Henry Peckham and John Daniel (members of the 1556 Dudley conspiracy), John Felton (Catholic), Roderigo Lopez, Henry Garnet (in connection with the Gunpowder Plot), and Gervase Helwys (in connection with the Overbury plot).

Henry Herbert, 2nd Earl of Pembroke

Earl of PembrokeHenry Herbert2nd Earl of Pembroke
On 25 May 1553, the couple were married at Durham House in a triple wedding, in which Jane's sister Catherine was matched with the heir of the Earl of Pembroke, Lord Herbert, and another Katherine, Lord Guildford's sister, with Henry Hastings, the Earl of Huntingdon's heir.
He was married to Lady Catherine Grey, sister of Lady Jane Grey, on 25 May 1553, in a political match arranged by their parents in the hopes of assisting the Duke of Northumberland with his plan to secure the succession of Lady Jane who on the same day alongside her sister married the Duke's younger son, Lord Guildford Dudley.

Heinrich Bullinger

Bullinger
Through the influence of her father and her tutors, she became a committed Protestant and also corresponded with the Zürich reformer Heinrich Bullinger.
He corresponded with Reformed, Anglican, Lutheran, and Baptist theologians, with Henry VIII of England, Edward VI of England, Lady Jane Grey and Elizabeth I of England, Christian II of Denmark, Philipp I of Hesse and Frederick III, Elector Palatine.