Lady Mary Wortley Montagu

Mary Wortley MontaguLady Mary PierrepontLady MontaguMary MontaguLady Mary MontaguLady Mary PierrepointLady Mary Wortley Montague
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (baptised 26 May 1689 – 21 August 1762) (née Pierrepont) was an English aristocrat, letter writer and poet.wikipedia
202 Related Articles

Smallpox

small poxsmall-poxvariola
Aside from her writing, Lady Mary is also known for introducing and advocating for smallpox inoculation to Britain after her return from Turkey.
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu observed smallpox inoculation during her stay in the Ottoman Empire, writing detailed accounts of the practice in her letters, and enthusiastically promoted the procedure in England upon her return in 1718.

Edward Wortley Montagu (traveller)

Edward Wortley MontaguEdwardEdward Wortley Montagu the younger
She had a son, Edward Wortley Montagu the younger, on 16 May 1713, in London. Lady Mary was eager to spare her children, thus, in March 1718 she had her nearly five-year-old son, Edward, inoculated with the help of Embassy surgeon Charles Maitland.
He was the son of Edward Wortley Montagu, MP and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, whose talent and eccentricity he seems to have inherited.

Edward Wortley Montagu (diplomat)

Edward Wortley MontaguEdward Wortley-MontaguEdward Wortley
By 1710, Lady Mary had two possible suitors to choose from: Edward Wortley Montagu and Clotworthy Skeffington.
Sir Edward Wortley-Montagu (8 February 167822 January 1761) was British Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, husband of the writer Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and father of the writer and traveller Edward Wortley Montagu.

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull

Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Marquess of DorchesterThe Duke of KingstonThe Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull
She was the eldest child of Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull (c.1655-1726) by his first wife Mary Fielding (d.1692).
Lady Mary Pierrepoint (d.1762), who married the diplomat Edward Wortley-Montagu

Thoresby Hall

ThoresbyThoresby ParkThoresby estate
The family's land-holdings were extensive, including Thoresby Hall and Holme Pierrepont Hall in Nottinghamshire, and a house in West Dean in Wiltshire.
The house was the birthplace of Lady Mary Pierrepont, wife of Edward Wortley Montagu, in 1689.

Inoculation

inoculuminoculatedinoculate
Aside from her writing, Lady Mary is also known for introducing and advocating for smallpox inoculation to Britain after her return from Turkey.
The practice was introduced to England by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Alexander Pope

PopeAlexander Pope’sMr. Pope
She was among the society of George I and the Prince of Wales, and counted amongst her friends Molly Skerritt, Lady Walpole, John, Lord Hervey, Mary Astell, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Abbé Antonio Schinella Conti.
Although he never married, he had many female friends to whom he wrote witty letters, including Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Mary Stuart, Countess of Bute

MaryMary Wortley MontaguLady Bute
While away from England, the Wortley Montagu's had a daughter on 19 January 1718, who would grow up to be Mary, Countess of Bute.
Lady Bute was born in 1718, the only daughter of Sir Edward Wortley Montagu and Lady Mary Pierrepont, the daughter of the Evelyn Pierrepont, 1st Duke of Kingston-upon-Hull.

Kit-Cat Club

Kit-cat portraitKit-Katspolitical club similarly named
Aged seven, she was chosen by members of the Kit-Cat Club as the subject of their toast to the beauty of the season, and had her name engraved on the glass goblet used for this purpose.
We know by name some of those who were toasted: Lady Mary Wortley Montagu; Lady Godolphin, Lady Sunderland, Lady Bridgewater, and Lady Monthermer, all daughters of John Churchill, 1st Duke of Marlborough, except Lady Mary Wortley Montagu who was the daughter of Evelyn Pierrepont, 5th Earl of Kingston-upon-Hull and only 7 years old when toasted; the Duchess of Bolton, the Duchess of Beaufort, the Duchess of St Albans; Anne Long, a daughter of Sir James Long, 2nd Baronet and friend of Jonathan Swift; Catherine Barton, Newton's niece and Charles Montagu's mistress; Mrs. Brudenell and Lady Wharton, Lady Carlisle and Mrs. Kirk and Mademoiselle Spanheim, among them.

John Hervey, 2nd Baron Hervey

Lord HerveyJohn, Lord HerveyJohn Hervey
She was among the society of George I and the Prince of Wales, and counted amongst her friends Molly Skerritt, Lady Walpole, John, Lord Hervey, Mary Astell, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Abbé Antonio Schinella Conti.
The quarrel is generally put down to Pope's jealousy of Hervey's friendship with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Mary Astell

Astell, Mary
She was among the society of George I and the Prince of Wales, and counted amongst her friends Molly Skerritt, Lady Walpole, John, Lord Hervey, Mary Astell, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Abbé Antonio Schinella Conti.
After the death of her mother and aunt in 1688, Astell moved to Chelsea, London, where she was fortunate enough to become acquainted with a circle of literary and influential women, including Lady Mary Chudleigh, Elizabeth Thomas, Judith Drake, Elizabeth Elstob, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Maria, Lady Walpole

Maria SkerrettMariaMolly Skerritt, Lady Walpole
She was among the society of George I and the Prince of Wales, and counted amongst her friends Molly Skerritt, Lady Walpole, John, Lord Hervey, Mary Astell, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Abbé Antonio Schinella Conti.
Lady Walpole was also often mentioned in the letters of Lady Mary Wortley Montagu as 'Molly'.

Antonio Schinella Conti

ContiConti, Antonio Schinella
She was among the society of George I and the Prince of Wales, and counted amongst her friends Molly Skerritt, Lady Walpole, John, Lord Hervey, Mary Astell, Sarah Churchill, Duchess of Marlborough, Alexander Pope, John Gay, and Abbé Antonio Schinella Conti.
During this period he also began a lasting friendship with Lady Mary Wortley Montagu, whose poems he translated, and who made him the recipient of her more philosophical Turkish Embassy Letters (1717–18).

Caroline of Ansbach

Queen CarolineCarolinePrincess of Wales
One of the poems was read as an attack on Caroline, Princess of Wales, in spite of the fact that the "attack" was voiced by a character who was herself heavily satirised.
She helped to popularise the practice of variolation (an early type of immunisation), which had been witnessed by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu and Charles Maitland in Constantinople.

Charles Maitland (physician)

Charles Maitland
Lady Mary was eager to spare her children, thus, in March 1718 she had her nearly five-year-old son, Edward, inoculated with the help of Embassy surgeon Charles Maitland.
In March 1718, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had Maitland, who was then serving in the British embassy in Constantinople, Turkey, inoculate her five-year-old son Edward.

Letters from Turkey

Turkish Embassy Letters
The story of this voyage and of her observations of Eastern life is told in Letters from Turkey, a series of lively letters full of graphic descriptions; Letters is often credited as being an inspiration for subsequent female travellers/writers, as well as for much Orientalist art.
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689-1762) was the wife of Edward Wortley Montagu, the British ambassador to Ottoman Empire between 1716-1718.

Variolation

inoculatedvaccineinoculation against smallpox
Lady Mary returned to the West with knowledge of the Ottoman practice of inoculation against smallpox, known as variolation.
Although the article did not gain widespread notoriety, it caught the attention of two important figures in the variolation movement, Bostonian preacher Cotton Mather and the wife of the British Ambassador to the Ottoman Empire, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Lady Louisa Stuart

Louisa
Montagu's octogenarian granddaughter Lady Louisa Stuart contributed to this, anonymously, an introductory essay called Biographical Anecdotes of Lady M. W. Montagu, from which it was clear that Stuart was troubled by her grandmother's focus on sexual intrigues and did not see Lady Mary Wortley Montagu's Account of the Court of George I at his Accession as history.
Stuart's mother, the Countess of Bute, was herself the daughter of the famous writer and traveller Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (1689–1762).

Edward Jenner

JennerJenner, EdwardDr. Edward Jenner
In later years, Edward Jenner, who was 13 years old when Lady Mary died, developed the much safer technique of vaccination using cowpox instead of smallpox.
In 1721, Lady Mary Wortley Montagu had imported variolation to Britain after having observed it in Constantinople.

Francesco Algarotti

AlgarottiALGAROTTI, Count F.Count Francesco Algarotti
In the same year, Mary met and fell in love with Count Francesco Algarotti, who competed with an equally smitten John Hervey for her affections.
He became embroiled in a lively bisexual love-triangle with the politician John Hervey, and Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Vaccination

vaccinationsvaccinatedvaccinating
In later years, Edward Jenner, who was 13 years old when Lady Mary died, developed the much safer technique of vaccination using cowpox instead of smallpox.
This kind of inoculation and other forms of variolation were introduced into England by Lady Montagu, a famous English letter-writer and wife of the English ambassador at Istanbul between 1716 and 1718, who almost died from smallpox as a young adult and was physically scarred from it. Inoculation was adopted both in England and in America nearly half a century before Jenner's famous smallpox vaccine of 1796 but the death rate of about 2% from this method meant that it was mainly used during dangerous outbreaks of the disease and remained controversial.

Claudius Amyand (surgeon)

Claudius Amyand
The Princess's two daughters were successfully inoculated in April 1722 by French-born surgeon Claudius Amyand.
In 1722, he inoculated three of the children of the Prince and Princess of Wales against smallpox, following the introduction of the process into the country from Turkey by Lady Mary Wortley Montagu.

Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres

IngresDominique IngresJean Auguste Dominique Ingres
However, Montagu's detailed descriptions of nude Oriental beauties provided inspiration for male artists such as Ingres, who restored the explicitly erotic content that Montagu had denied.
His numerous odalisque paintings were influenced to a great extent by the writings of Mary Wortley Montagu, the wife of the ambassador to Turkey whose diaries and letters, when published, fascinated European society.

English people

EnglishEnglishmanBritish
Lady Mary Wortley Montagu (baptised 26 May 1689 – 21 August 1762) (née Pierrepont) was an English aristocrat, letter writer and poet.

Ottoman Empire

OttomanOttomansTurks
Lady Mary is today chiefly remembered for her letters, particularly her letters from travels to the Ottoman Empire, as wife to the British ambassador to Turkey, which have been described by Billie Melman as "the very first example of a secular work by a woman about the Muslim Orient".