Lake Ainslie

Lake Ainslie on Cape Breton Island is the second largest natural freshwater lake in Nova Scotia.wikipedia
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Cape Breton Island

Cape BretonCape Breton, Nova ScotiaC'''ape Breton Island
Lake Ainslie on Cape Breton Island is the second largest natural freshwater lake in Nova Scotia.
Cape Breton Island's hydrological features include the Bras d'Or Lake system, a salt-water fjord at the heart of the island, and freshwater features including Lake Ainslie, the Margaree River system, and the Mira River.

Margaree River

Southwest MargareeMargaree Valley
The Southwest Margaree River starts at the lake and empties into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.
The northeast branch of the river derives from the watershed of the Cape Breton Highlands, while the Southwest Margaree flows northeast from Lake Ainslie.

George Robert Ainslie

The lake was named after George Robert Ainslie, the Lieutenant Governor of Cape Breton Island from 1816 to 1820, when Cape Breton became part of Nova Scotia.

Lake

lacustrinefreshwater lakenatural freshwater lake
Lake Ainslie on Cape Breton Island is the second largest natural freshwater lake in Nova Scotia.

Nova Scotia

NSNova Scotia, CanadaNova Scotian
Lake Ainslie on Cape Breton Island is the second largest natural freshwater lake in Nova Scotia. The lake was named after George Robert Ainslie, the Lieutenant Governor of Cape Breton Island from 1816 to 1820, when Cape Breton became part of Nova Scotia.

Gulf of Saint Lawrence

Gulf of St. LawrenceGulf of St LawrenceGulf
The Southwest Margaree River starts at the lake and empties into the Gulf of Saint Lawrence.

Bald eagle

bald eaglesAmerican bald eagleHaliaeetus leucocephalus
A number of bald eagles nest around the lake.

Inverness County, Nova Scotia

Inverness CountyInvernessMunicipality of the County of Inverness

Glacier

glaciersglacialglaciated

Thomas Robert McInnes

Thomas R. McInnes
McInnes was born in Lake Ainslie, Nova Scotia to Scottish immigrant parents.

Canadian Gaelic

GaelicScottish GaelicCanadian communities with Scottish Gaelic speakers
In 1890, Thomas Robert McInnes, an independent Senator from British Columbia (born Lake Ainslie, Cape Breton Island) tabled a bill entitled "An Act to Provide for the Use of Gaelic in Official Proceedings."

Lake Charlotte, Nova Scotia

Lake Charlotte
Reaching a maximum depth of 48 meters in the deepest point, and with many areas of the north half featuring depths in excess of 20 meters, it is deeper than Kejimkujik Lake, Nova Scotia's largest natural lake, and Lake Ainslie, Nova Scotia's second largest lake.

Margaree Salmon Association

The Margaree Salmon Association was involved in the nomination and designation of the Margaree River-Lake Ainslie watershed; as a Canadian Heritage Rivers System.

Allan MacEachen

Allan J. MacEachenAllan Joseph MacEachenMinister for External Affairs MacEachen
After leaving the Senate, MacEachen retired to Nova Scotia spending the rest of his life at his house on Lake Ainslie in Inverness County, Cape Breton and in Antigonish.

Military history of Nova Scotia

Military history of Nova Scotia - War of 1812American Revolution - Nova Scotia theatreInvasion of Martinique (1809)

Epidemiology of leprosy

Cape Breton Island also suffered an outbreak, in the Lake Ainslie region.

East Lake Ainslie, Nova Scotia

East Lake Ainslie
East Lake Ainslie is a small community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in Inverness County on Cape Breton Island on the shore of Lake Ainslie.

Riverville, Nova Scotia

Riverville
It lies on Route 19 at its intersection with Blackstone Road, some 7 km southwest of the northwest arm of Lake Ainslie.

South Lake Ainslie, Nova Scotia

South Lake Ainslie
South Lake Ainslie is a small community in the Canadian province of Nova Scotia, located in Inverness County on Cape Breton Island on the shore of Lake Ainslie.