Lake Manly

Lake Manly was a pluvial lake in Death Valley, California, covering much of Death Valley with a surface area of 1600 km2 during the so-called "Blackwelder stand".wikipedia
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Lake Manix

Lake Manly collected the overflow from a number of lakes including Lake Tecopa, Mono Lake, Lake Owens, Searles Lake, Lake Panamint, Lake Mojave, Lake Dumont and Lake Manix.
It covered a surface area of 236 km2 and reached an altitude of 543 m at highstands, although poorly recognizable shorelines have been found at altitudes of 547 - 558 m. The lake was fed by increased runoff during the Pleistocene and overflowed into the Lake Mojave basin and from there to Lake Manly in Death Valley, or less likely into the Bristol Lake basin and from there to the Colorado River.

Death Valley

Death Valley, California
Lake Manly was a pluvial lake in Death Valley, California, covering much of Death Valley with a surface area of 1600 km2 during the so-called "Blackwelder stand".
According to current geological consensus, at various times during the middle of the Pleistocene era, which ended roughly 10,000–12,000 years ago, an inland lake referred to as Lake Manly formed in Death Valley.

Lake Mojave

This lake was the largest known Lake Manly; theories that the lake merged with Lake Mojave farther south or even overflowed into the Colorado River close to Ludlow and across several other basins are, however, questionable.
The Mojave River did not always end in Lake Mojave; at other points of its history it reached Lake Harper, Lake Manix, the Cronese Lakes and Lake Manly.

Owens River

Owens
The lake received water mainly from the Amargosa River and at various points from the Mojave River and Owens River.
Ancient, now-abandoned river channels suggest that the extended Owens River ran south to China Lake, then east into Searles Lake, north into the Panamint Valley (where it formed Panamint Lake) and finally east into Death Valley and the ancient Lake Manly.

Lake Tecopa

It originally ended in Lake Tecopa; only more recently than 600,000 years ago did it arrive at Death Valley, possibly as recently as 140,000 to 18,000 years ago.
Afterwards, the Amargosa River cut a gorge out of the lake and into Death Valley with its Lake Manly, causing the disappearance of the lake.

Lake Panamint

Panamint valleys
Lake Manly collected the overflow from a number of lakes including Lake Tecopa, Mono Lake, Lake Owens, Searles Lake, Lake Panamint, Lake Mojave, Lake Dumont and Lake Manix.
At times, Lake Panamint itself overflowed into Death Valley and Lake Manly.

Amargosa River

Amargosa
The lake received water mainly from the Amargosa River and at various points from the Mojave River and Owens River.
Disappearing into the ground, it feeds the aquifer that is the remnant of prehistoric Lake Manly.

Pluvial lake

pluvialpluvial lakesformer lake
Lake Manly was a pluvial lake in Death Valley, California, covering much of Death Valley with a surface area of 1600 km2 during the so-called "Blackwelder stand".
Lake Manly

Great Basin

Gran CuencaGreat Basin regionCentral Basin and Range ecoregion
The existence of large ancient lakes in the Great Basin of the United States was already proposed by the end of the 19th century, when the existence of Lake Lahontan and Lake Bonneville was first described.
Lake Lahontan, Lake Manly, and Lake Mojave were similar Pleistocene lakes.

William L. Manly

William Lewis Manly
The lake was named in honor of William Lewis Manly, who rescued white immigrants from Death Valley in 1849.
For this reason, three geographic features in Death Valley bear his name: the Manly Beacon near Zabriskie Point, Manly Peak, situated to the south between Panamint Valley and the Death Valley, and Lake Manly, the ancient dried lake in the Valley.

Tecopa Lake Beds

Lake Tecopa
Lake Manly collected the overflow from a number of lakes including Lake Tecopa, Mono Lake, Lake Owens, Searles Lake, Lake Panamint, Lake Mojave, Lake Dumont and Lake Manix.
Lake Manly

Lake Russell (prehistoric)

Lake Russell
These rivers in turn received inflow from other paleolakes, such as Lake Pahrump which drained into the Amargosa River and shares fish with the latter, Lake Dumont/Lake Manix/Lake Mojave which were passed through by the Mojave River, and after 1.6 million years ago Lake Russell (present day Mono Lake) through the Owens River.
This overflow is biogeographically important, as it connected Lake Russell via the Owens River to Owens Lake, Searles Lake, Panamint Lake and Lake Manly in Death Valley.

Badwater Basin

BadwaterInyolowest
Death Valley is about 200 km long and 10 - 30 km wide and consists of three basins: Badwater Basin which reaches a depth of 86 m beneath sea level, Cottonball Basin and Middle Basin.
Throughout the Quaternary's wetter spans, streams running from nearby mountains filled Death Valley, creating Lake Manly, which during its greatest extents was approximately 80 mi (130 km) long and up to 600 ft (180 m) deep.

Places of interest in the Death Valley area

Panamint Charcoal Kilnsalso protectsArtist's Palette
The most prominent shoreline at about 90 m elevation is known as "Blackwelder shoreline"; even higher shorelines have been identified at Shoreline Butte.
Scientists call all manifestations of this large body of water Lake Manly.

Death Valley pupfish

The speciation of Cyprinodon nevadensis and Cyprinodon salinus may have occurred in just a few thousand years after the drying of Lake Manly.
They are thought to be the remainders of a large ecosystem of fish species that lived in Lake Manly, which dried up at the end of the last ice age leaving the present day Death Valley.

Panamint Valley

Lake PanamintPanamint
At least during the Tahoe glaciation, the Owens River drained into Lake Manly after filling Owens Lake, China Lake, Searles Lake and the Panamint Valley.
The valley is an internally drained endorheic basin and its central salt flat/hardpan can contain an ephemeral lake, like it did after unusually heavy rains in the spring of 2005. During pluvial periods of the Pleistocene, inflow from a chain of streams and lakes to the northwest sustained a large lake known as Lake Panamint that overflowed into Lake Manly in Death Valley.

California

CAState of CaliforniaCalifornia, USA
Lake Manly was a pluvial lake in Death Valley, California, covering much of Death Valley with a surface area of 1600 km2 during the so-called "Blackwelder stand".

Mojave River

Mojave
The lake received water mainly from the Amargosa River and at various points from the Mojave River and Owens River.

Pupfish

CyprinodontidaecyprinodontCyprinodontidatae
The lake and its substantial catchment favoured the spread of a number of aquatic species, including some lizards, pupfish and springsnails.

Ecosystem

ecosystemsenvironmenteco-system
The lake probably supported a substantial ecosystem, and a number of diatoms developed there.

Diatom

diatomsBacillariophyceaeBacillariophyta
The lake probably supported a substantial ecosystem, and a number of diatoms developed there.

Miocene

Late MioceneEarly MioceneMiddle Miocene
After some poorly defined lake stages during the Miocene, Pliocene and early Pleistocene, the first large lake stage occurred about 185,000–128,000 years ago during the Tahoe glacial stage and formed the Blackwelder shorelines.

Pliocene

Late PliocenePliocene epochEarly Pliocene
After some poorly defined lake stages during the Miocene, Pliocene and early Pleistocene, the first large lake stage occurred about 185,000–128,000 years ago during the Tahoe glacial stage and formed the Blackwelder shorelines.

Pleistocene

Late PleistocenePleistocene epochPleistocene era
After some poorly defined lake stages during the Miocene, Pliocene and early Pleistocene, the first large lake stage occurred about 185,000–128,000 years ago during the Tahoe glacial stage and formed the Blackwelder shorelines.

Colorado River

ColoradoGrand RiverLower Colorado River
This lake was the largest known Lake Manly; theories that the lake merged with Lake Mojave farther south or even overflowed into the Colorado River close to Ludlow and across several other basins are, however, questionable.