Lakota peoplewikipedia
The Lakota (pronounced, Lakota language: Lakȟóta) are a Native American tribe.
LakotaLakota SiouxSiouxDakotaTeton SiouxTetonSioux IndiansLakotasLakota NationSantee Sioux

Lakota language

LakotaLakhotaStandard Lakota Orthography
The Lakota (pronounced, Lakota language: Lakȟóta) are a Native American tribe.
Lakota (Lakȟótiyapi), also referred to as Lakhota, Teton or Teton Sioux, is a Siouan language spoken by the Lakota people of the Sioux tribes.

South Dakota

SDSouth DakotaState of South Dakota
Their current lands are in North and South Dakota.
It is named after the Lakota and Dakota Sioux Native American tribes, who compose a large portion of the population and historically dominated the territory.

Sioux

DakotaSiouxSiouan
Also known as the Teton Sioux (from Thítȟuŋwaŋ), they are one of the three Sioux tribes of Plains.
The Sioux comprise three major divisions based on language divisions: the Dakota, Lakota and Nakota.

Sitting Bull

Sitting BullChief Sitting BullMarcellus Red Tomahawk
Notable Lakota persons include Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake (Sitting Bull) from the Húnkpapȟa band; Touch the Clouds from the Miniconjou band Maȟpíya Lúta (Red Cloud), Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk), Siŋté Glešká (Spotted Tail), Billy Mills, and the legendary Tȟašúŋke Witkó, Crazy Horse from the Oglala band.
Sitting Bull ( in Standard Lakota orthography, also nicknamed Húŋkešni or "Slow") was a Hunkpapa Lakota leader who led his people during years of resistance to United States government policies.

Brulé

Brulé LakotaSicangu LakotaSičháŋǧu
The Brulé are one of the seven branches or bands (sometimes called "sub-tribes") of the Teton (Titonwan) Lakota American Indian people.

Oglala Lakota

OglalaOglala SiouxOglala Sioux Tribe
The Oglala Lakota or Oglala Sioux (pronounced, meaning "to scatter one's own" in Lakota language ) are one of the seven subtribes of the Lakota people who, along with the Dakota, make up the Great Sioux Nation.

Black Elk

Nicholas Black ElkBlack ElkHeȟáka Sápa
Notable Lakota persons include Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake (Sitting Bull) from the Húnkpapȟa band; Touch the Clouds from the Miniconjou band Maȟpíya Lúta (Red Cloud), Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk), Siŋté Glešká (Spotted Tail), Billy Mills, and the legendary Tȟašúŋke Witkó, Crazy Horse from the Oglala band.
Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk) (December 1, 1863 – August 19, 1950) was a famous wičháša wakȟáŋ (medicine man and holy man) and heyoka of the Oglala Lakota (Sioux) who lived in the present-day United States, primarily South Dakota.

North Dakota

NDNorthNorth Dakota
Their current lands are in North and South Dakota.
Later came divisions of the Dakota people - the Lakota, the Santee and the Yanktonai.

Sihasapa

SihásapaBlackfeetBlackfoot Sioux
The Sihásapa or Blackfoot Sioux are a division of the Lakota people, Titonwan, or Teton.

Hunkpapa

HúŋkpapȟaHunkpapa LakotaHunkpappa
The Hunkpapa (Lakota: Húŋkpapȟa) are a Native American group, one of the seven council fires of the Lakota tribe.

Plains Indians

PlainsPlains IndianPlains tribes
Also known as the Teton Sioux (from Thítȟuŋwaŋ), they are one of the three Sioux tribes of Plains.
These include the Blackfoot, Arapaho, Assiniboine, Cheyenne, Comanche, Crow, Gros Ventre, Kiowa, Lakota, Lipan, Plains Apache (or Kiowa Apache), Plains Cree, Plains Ojibwe, Sarsi, Nakoda (Stoney), and Tonkawa.

Touch the Clouds

Touch the Clouds (''Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya'')Touch the Clouds
Notable Lakota persons include Tȟatȟáŋka Íyotake (Sitting Bull) from the Húnkpapȟa band; Touch the Clouds from the Miniconjou band Maȟpíya Lúta (Red Cloud), Heȟáka Sápa (Black Elk), Siŋté Glešká (Spotted Tail), Billy Mills, and the legendary Tȟašúŋke Witkó, Crazy Horse from the Oglala band.
Touch the Clouds (Lakota: Maȟpíya Ičáȟtagya or Maȟpíya Íyapat'o) (c. 1838 – September 5, 1905) was a chief of the Minneconjou Teton Lakota (also known as Sioux) known for his bravery and skill in battle, physical strength and diplomacy in counsel.

Cheyenne

CheyenneNorthern CheyenneSouthern Cheyenne
Around 1730, Cheyenne people introduced the Lakota to horses, called šuŋkawakaŋ ("dog [of] power/mystery/wonder"). In 1765, a Saône exploring and raiding party led by Chief Standing Bear discovered the Black Hills (the Paha Sapa), then the territory of the Cheyenne.
At times they have been allied with the Lakota and Arapaho, and at other points enemies of the Lakota.

Two Kettles

OóhenuŋpaOohenumpaO'ohenuŋpa
Two Kettles or O'ohe Nuŋpa (O'ohenuŋpa, O'ohenonpa - "Two Boilings" or "Two Kettles") was a large sub division of the Lakota Sioux tribe of Native Americans, numbering about 5000-6000 in 1800, united with the Blackfeet/Sihasapa band in 1824, were decimated by smallpox in 1851, then by cholera, now considered extinct.

Black Hills

Black Hills of South DakotaBlack HillsB'''lack '''H'''ills
In 1765, a Saône exploring and raiding party led by Chief Standing Bear discovered the Black Hills (the Paha Sapa), then the territory of the Cheyenne.
After conquering the Cheyenne in 1776, the Lakota took over the territory of the Black Hills, which became central to their culture.

Miniconjou

MnikȟówožuMinneconjouMiniconjou Sioux
The Miniconjou (Lakota: Mnikȟówožu, Hokwoju – ‘Plants by the Water’) are a Native American people constituting a subdivision of the Lakota people, who formerly inhabited an area in western present-day South Dakota from the Black Hills in to the Platte River.

Sans Arc

ItázipčhoItazipcoSans Arc Lakota
The Sans Arc, or Itázipčho (Itazipcola, Hazipco - ‘Those who hunt without bows’) in Lakota, are a subdivision of the Lakota people.

Dakota people

DakotaYanktonSantee
The total population of the Sioux (Lakota, Santee, Yankton, and Yanktonai) was estimated at 28,000 by French explorers in 1660.
The Eastern and Western Dakota are two of the three groupings belonging to the Sioux nation (also called Dakota in a broad sense), the third being the Lakota (Thítȟuŋwaŋ or Teton).

Red Cloud's War

historicRed Fetterman massacreRed Cloubattle with Indians
Oglala Chief Red Cloud led his people to victory in Red Cloud's War.
Red Cloud's War (also referred to as the Bozeman War or the Powder River War) was an armed conflict between the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Northern Arapaho on one side and the United States in Wyoming and Montana territories from 1866 to 1868.

Nebraska

NENebraskaState of Nebraska
On September 3, 1855, 700 soldiers under American General William S. Harney avenged the Grattan Massacre by attacking a Lakota village in Nebraska, killing about 100 men, women, and children.
Indigenous peoples including Omaha, Missouria, Ponca, Pawnee, Otoe, and various branches of the Lakota (Sioux) tribes lived in the region for thousands of years before European exploration.

Grattan massacre

massacredGrattan affair
On September 3, 1855, 700 soldiers under American General William S. Harney avenged the Grattan Massacre by attacking a Lakota village in Nebraska, killing about 100 men, women, and children.
The Grattan Massacre, also known as the Grattan Fight, was the opening engagement of the First Sioux War, fought between United States Army and Lakota Sioux warriors on August 19, 1854.

Massacre Canyon

Sioux–Pawnee relationsmassacre on the Pawnee Indians
Next time the Lakotas inflicted a blow so severe on the Pawnee would be in 1873, during the Massacre Canyon battle near Republican River.
It was one of the last hostilities between the Pawnee and the Sioux (or Lakota) and the last battle/massacre between Great Plains Indians in North America.

Battle of the Little Bighorn

Little BighornLittle Big HornCuster's Last Stand
They fought a successful delaying action against General George Crook's army at the Battle of the Rosebud, preventing Crook from locating and attacking their camp, and a week later defeated the U.S. 7th Cavalry in 1876 at the Battle of the Greasy Grass in the Crow Indian Reservation of 1868.
The Battle of the Little Bighorn, known to the Lakota and other Plains Indians as the Battle of the Greasy Grass and also commonly referred to as Custer's Last Stand, was an armed engagement between combined forces of the Lakota, Northern Cheyenne, and Arapaho tribes and the 7th Cavalry Regiment of the United States Army.

White Buffalo Calf Woman

Ptesáŋwiŋ
The Battiste Good winter count records Lakota history back to 900 CE, when White Buffalo Calf Woman gave the Lakota people the White Buffalo Calf Pipe.
White Buffalo Calf Woman (Lakȟótiyapi: Ptesáŋwiŋ) is a sacred woman of supernatural origin, central to the Lakota religion as the primary cultural prophet.

Treaty of Fort Laramie (1868)

Treaty of Fort LaramieFort Laramie TreatyFort Laramie Treaty of 1868
In 1868, the United States signed the Fort Laramie Treaty of 1868, exempting the Black Hills from all white settlement forever.
The Treaty of Fort Laramie (also the Sioux Treaty of 1868) was an agreement between the United States and the Oglala, Miniconjou, and Brulé bands of Lakota people, Yanktonai Dakota and Arapaho Nation, following the failure of the first Fort Laramie treaty, signed in 1851.