Lamb of God

Agnus DeiPaschal LambLambthe LambEcce Agnus DeiAgnuslamb and flagLamb of ChristHoly LambThe Lamb of God
Lamb of God (Ἀμνὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ; Agnus Deī ) is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of John.wikipedia
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Agnus Dei (music)

Agnus DeiAgnusAgnus Dei (Lamb of God)
The Agnus Dei also forms a part of the musical setting for the Mass.
Agnus Dei, referring to the Christian theological concept of the Lamb of God and the associated liturgical text from the Roman Catholic Latin Mass, has been set to music by many composers, as it is normally one of the movements or sections in a sung Mass setting.

God in Christianity

GodChristian GodLord
Christian doctrine holds that a divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of his full obedience to the will of his divine Father, as an "agent and servant of God" in carrying away the sins of the world.
John 12:27 presents the sacrifice of Jesus the Lamb of God, and the ensuing salvation delivered through it as the glorification of the name of God, with the voice from Heaven confirming Jesus' petition ("Father, glorify thy name") by saying: "I have both glorified it, and will glorify it again" referring to the Baptism and crucifixion of Jesus.

Agnus Dei (liturgy)

Agnus Deia standard partAGN(us) / DEI
The Lamb of God title is widely used in Christian prayers, and the Agnus Dei is used as a standard part of the Latin Catholic Mass, as well as the classical Western Liturgies of the Anglican and Lutheran Churches.
In the Mass of the Roman Rite and also in the Eucharist of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Church, and the Western Rite of the Orthodox Church the Agnus Dei is the invocation to the Lamb of God sung or recited during the fraction of the Host.

John the Baptist

St. John the BaptistSaint John the BaptistSt John the Baptist
It appears at John 1:29, where John the Baptist sees Jesus and exclaims, "Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sin of the world."
He is also depicted as an ascetic wearing camel hair, with a staff and scroll inscribed Ecce Agnus Dei, or bearing a book or dish with a lamb on it.

Seven Spirits of God

seven spiritsLord of Spiritsseven eyes of God
The reference to the lamb in Revelation 5:6 relates it to the Seven Spirits of God which first appear in Revelation 1:4 and are associated with Jesus who holds them along with seven stars.
The reference to the lamb in Revelation 5:6 relates it to the Seven Spirits which first appear in Revelation 1:4 and are associated with Jesus who holds them along with seven stars.

Names and titles of Jesus in the New Testament

Holy SaviourName of JesusSan Salvatore
Lamb of God (Ἀμνὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ; Agnus Deī ) is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of John.
The title Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) only appears in the Gospel of John, with the exclamation of John the Baptist: "Behold the Lamb of God who takes away the sins of the world" in John 1:29, the title reaffirmed the next day in John 1:36.

Crucifixion of Jesus

CrucifixiondeathCrucifixion of Christ
Christian doctrine holds that a divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of his full obedience to the will of his divine Father, as an "agent and servant of God" in carrying away the sins of the world. John Calvin presented the same Christological view, of "The Lamb as the agent of God", by arguing that in his trial before Pilate and while at Herod's Court Jesus could have argued for his innocence, but instead remained mostly quiet and submitted to crucifixion in obedience to the Father, for he knew his role as the Lamb of God.
Further reinforcement of the concept is provided in Revelation 21:14 where the "lamb slain but standing" is the only one worthy of handling the scroll (i.e. the book) containing the names of those who are to be saved.

Salvation in Christianity

atonementsalvationAtonement in Christianity
In Johannine Christology the proclamation "who takes away the sin of the world" begins the unfolding of the salvific theme of the redemptive and sacrificial death of Jesus followed by his resurrection which is built upon in other proclamations such as "this is indeed the Saviour of the world" uttered by the Samaritans in John 4:42.
The Gospel of John portrays him as the sacrificial Lamb of God, and compares His death to the sacrifice of the Passover Lamb at Pesach.

Fraction (religion)

FractionbreakingBreaking of the Bread
In the Mass of the Roman Rite and also in the Eucharist of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Church, and the Western Rite of the Orthodox Church the Agnus Dei is the invocation to the Lamb of God sung or recited during the fraction of the Host.
In the Roman Rite of the Catholic Church, it is accompanied by the singing or recitation of the Agnus Dei.

Mass (music)

massmassesMass setting
Agnus Dei has been set to music by many composers, usually as part of a Mass setting.
The Agnus Dei is a setting of the "Lamb of God" litany, containing the responses miserere nobis (have mercy upon us), repeated twice, and dona nobis pacem (grant us peace) once at the end.

Resurrection of Jesus

resurrectionResurrection of Christresurrection of Jesus Christ
The theme of a sacrificial lamb which rises in victory as the Resurrected Christ was employed in early Christology.
states, "Get rid of the old yeast that you may be a new batch without yeast – as you really are. For Christ, our Passover lamb, has been sacrificed"; this refers to the Passover requirement to have no yeast in the house and to the allegory of Jesus as the Paschal lamb.

Moravian Church

MoravianMoraviansMoravian Brethren
The Moravian Church uses an Agnus Dei as their seal with the surrounding inscription Vicit agnus noster, eum sequamur ("Our Lamb has conquered, let us follow him").
The Moravian Church's emblem is the Lamb of God (Agnus Dei) with the flag of victory, surrounded by the Latin inscription "Vicit agnus noster, eum sequamur" ('Our Lamb has conquered, let us follow Him').

Early Christian art and architecture

Early Christian artEarly ChristianEarly Christian architecture
In Early Christian art the symbol appears very early on.
Initially Jesus was represented indirectly by pictogram symbols such as the Ichthys (fish), peacock, Lamb of God, or an anchor (the Labarum or Chi-Rho was a later development).

Sacrificial lamb

lambVictimPaschal Lamb
The theme of a sacrificial lamb which rises in victory as the Resurrected Christ was employed in early Christology.

Jesus at Herod's court

HerodHerod mocks JesusHerod questioned
John Calvin presented the same Christological view, of "The Lamb as the agent of God", by arguing that in his trial before Pilate and while at Herod's Court Jesus could have argued for his innocence, but instead remained mostly quiet and submitted to crucifixion in obedience to the Father, for he knew his role as the Lamb of God.
Calvin stated that Jesus could have argued for his innocence, but instead remained mostly quiet and willingly submitted to his crucifixion in obedience to the will of the Father, for he knew his role as the "willing Lamb of God".

Blood of Christ

BloodPrecious BloodHoly Blood
), symbolizing Jesus' shedding of his blood to take away the sins of the world (Cf.
Devotion to the Precious Blood was a special phenomenon of Flemish piety in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, that gave rise to the iconic image of Grace as the "Fountain of Life," filled with blood, pouring from the wounded "Lamb of God" or the "Holy Wounds" of Christ.

Jesus in Christianity

JesusJesus ChristChrist
* Jesus in Christianity
These teachings emphasize that as the Lamb of God, Jesus chose to suffer on the cross at Calvary as a sign of his obedience to the will of God, as an "agent and servant of God".

Perth, Scotland

PerthOakbankOakbank Primary School
A Paschal Lamb is a charge used in heraldry, for example as the crest of the Davie Baronets, and is blazoned: A paschal lamb This charge is depicted as a lamb standing with body facing towards the dexter (viewer's left), with nimbus, and with head facing forwards (or turned looking backwards to sinister, termed reguardant) holding under its right foreleg a flagpole, tipped with a small cross, resting at a diagonal angle over its shoulder, flying a banner of the Cross of St. George (except in Perth's coat of arms, where it flies a banner of the Cross of St Andrew).
The coat of arms of Perth is: Gules a Paschal lamb reguardant argent haloed or holding under its right foreleg a flagpole topped with a cross of the second, to which is attached a banner azure a saltire argent, all within a tressure flory-counter-flory of the last.

Mass (liturgy)

MassMassesHoly Mass
The Lamb of God title is widely used in Christian prayers, and the Agnus Dei is used as a standard part of the Latin Catholic Mass, as well as the classical Western Liturgies of the Anglican and Lutheran Churches. In the Mass of the Roman Rite and also in the Eucharist of the Anglican Communion, the Lutheran Church, and the Western Rite of the Orthodox Church the Agnus Dei is the invocation to the Lamb of God sung or recited during the fraction of the Host.
The Agnus Dei is chanted while the clergy and assistants first commune, followed by lay communicants.

Passover sacrifice

Paschal lambKorban Pesachpascal lamb
One view suggests the symbolism of Leviticus 16 as scapegoat, coupled with Romans 3:21–25 for atonement, while another view draws parallels with the Paschal Lamb in Exodus 12:1–4, coupled with John 1:29–36, and yet another symbolism relies on Revelation 5:5–14 in which the lamb is viewed as a lion who destroys evil.
In Christianity, the sacrifice of the Passover lamb is considered to be fulfilled by the crucifixion and death of Jesus, who is consequently also given the title Lamb of God.

Pope Sergius I

Sergius ISergiusPope Sergius
It is said to have been introduced into the Mass by Pope Sergius I (687–701).
Practices in the Church in the West that had got the attention of the Eastern Patriarchates were condemned, such as: the practice of celebrating Mass on weekdays in Lent (rather than having Pre-Sanctified Liturgies); of fasting on Saturdays throughout the year; of omitting the "Alleluia" in Lent; of depicting Christ as a Lamb.

Halo (religious iconography)

halonimbushalos
A Paschal Lamb is a charge used in heraldry, for example as the crest of the Davie Baronets, and is blazoned: A paschal lamb This charge is depicted as a lamb standing with body facing towards the dexter (viewer's left), with nimbus, and with head facing forwards (or turned looking backwards to sinister, termed reguardant) holding under its right foreleg a flagpole, tipped with a small cross, resting at a diagonal angle over its shoulder, flying a banner of the Cross of St. George (except in Perth's coat of arms, where it flies a banner of the Cross of St Andrew).
The halo was incorporated into Early Christian art sometime in the 4th century with the earliest iconic images of Christ, initially the only figure shown with one (together with his symbol, the Lamb of God).

Gospel of John

JohnJohn's GospelFourth Gospel
Lamb of God (Ἀμνὸς τοῦ Θεοῦ; Agnus Deī ) is a title for Jesus that appears in the Gospel of John.

God the Son

Sonthe SonGod
Christian doctrine holds that a divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of his full obedience to the will of his divine Father, as an "agent and servant of God" in carrying away the sins of the world.

Calvary

GolgothaMount CalvaryGolgatha
Christian doctrine holds that a divine Jesus chose to suffer crucifixion at Calvary as a sign of his full obedience to the will of his divine Father, as an "agent and servant of God" in carrying away the sins of the world.