Lancashire

Lancashire, EnglandCounty Palatine of LancasterLancasterLancastrianCounty of LancasterLancastriansSouth LancashireEast LancashireCounty of LancashireNorth Lancashire
Lancashire (, ; abbreviated Lancs.) is a ceremonial county in North West England.wikipedia
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North West England

North WestNorth West of EnglandNorthwest England
Lancashire (, ; abbreviated Lancs.) is a ceremonial county in North West England.
North West England, one of nine official regions of England, consists of the five counties of Cheshire, Cumbria, Greater Manchester, Lancashire and Merseyside.

Preston, Lancashire

PrestonPreston, EnglandPreston Guild
The administrative centre is Preston. Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Preston is a city and the administrative centre of Lancashire, England, on the north bank of the River Ribble.

River Ribble

RibbleRibble ValleyRibble Estuary
The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire.
The River Ribble runs through North Yorkshire and Lancashire in Northern England.

Liverpool

Liverpool, EnglandLiverpudlianCity of Liverpool
Liverpool and Manchester grew into its largest cities, with economies built around the docks and the cotton mills respectively.
Liverpool is on the eastern side of the Mersey Estuary, and historically lay within the ancient hundred of West Derby in the southwest of the county of Lancashire in North West England.

Blackburn

Blackburn, LancashireBlackburn, EnglandBlackburn Aircraft
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Blackburn is a town in Lancashire, England, north of the West Pennine Moors on the southern edge of the Ribble Valley, 9 mi east of Preston and 20.9 mi NNW of Manchester.

River Mersey

MerseyMersey EstuaryMersey River
The land that lay between the Ribble and Mersey, Inter Ripam et Mersam, was included in the returns for Cheshire.
The river may have been the border between the ancient kingdoms of Mercia and Northumbria and for centuries it formed part of the boundary between the historic counties of Lancashire and Cheshire.

Burnley

Burnley, LancashireBurnley (Kimberley and Waterloo) DetachmentsBurnley Blues Festival
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Burnley is a town in Lancashire, England, with a 2001 population of 73,021.

Mill town

mill villagefactory townmill towns
The county contained several mill towns and the collieries of the Lancashire Coalfield.
In the United Kingdom, the term "mill town" usually refers to the 19th century textile manufacturing towns of northern England and the Scottish Lowlands, particularly those in Lancashire (cotton) and Yorkshire (wool).

Manchester

Manchester, EnglandManchester, United KingdomCity of Manchester
Liverpool and Manchester grew into its largest cities, with economies built around the docks and the cotton mills respectively. Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
It is historically a part of Lancashire, although areas of Cheshire south of the River Mersey were incorporated in the 20th century.

Accrington

Accrington, LancashireAccrington Town HallAccrington Urban Area
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Accrington is a town in the Hyndburn borough of Lancashire, England.

Chorley

Chorley, LancashireChorley, EnglandChorley Panthers
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Chorley is a town in Lancashire, England, 8.1 mi north of Wigan, 10.8 mi south west of Blackburn, 11 mi north west of Bolton, 12 mi south of Preston and 19.5 mi north west of Manchester.

Blackpool

Blackpool, EnglandBlackpool, LancashireBlackpool Borough Council
Blackpool was a centre for tourism for the inhabitants of Lancashire's mill towns, particularly during wakes week.
Blackpool is a town and seaside resort on the Lancashire coast in North West England.

Darwen

Over DarwenDarwen Cricket ClubDarwen Golf Club
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Darwen is a market town and civil parish located in Lancashire, England.

Lancashire Coalfield

LancashireSouth Lancashire CoalfieldLancashire Coal Measures
The county contained several mill towns and the collieries of the Lancashire Coalfield.
The Romans may have been the first to use coal in Lancashire and its shallow seams and outcrops were exploited on a small scale from the Middle Ages and extensively after the start of the Industrial Revolution.

Bury, Greater Manchester

BuryBury, LancashireBury Town Hall
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Historically part of Lancashire, Bury emerged in the Industrial Revolution as a mill town manufacturing textiles.

Oldham

Oldham, EnglandOldham, LancashireOldham, Greater Manchester
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Historically in Lancashire, and with little early history to speak of, Oldham rose to prominence in the 19th century as an international centre of textile manufacture.

Rochdale

Rochdale, EnglandRochdale, LancashireRochdale (ENG)
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Historically part of Lancashire, Rochdale's recorded history begins with an entry in the Domesday Book of 1086 under

Bolton

Bolton, EnglandBolton, LancashireBolton, Greater Manchester
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Historically part of Lancashire, Bolton originated as a small settlement in the moorland known as Bolton le Moors.

Wigan

Wigan, EnglandWigan, LancashireWigan, Greater Manchester
Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
Historically in Lancashire, Wigan during classical antiquity was in the territory of the Brigantes, an ancient Celtic tribe that ruled much of what is now northern England.

Lancaster, Lancashire

LancasterLancaster, EnglandLancastrian
The county palatine boundaries remain the same as those of the pre-1974 county with Lancaster serving as the county town, and the Duke of Lancaster (i.e. the Queen) exercising sovereignty rights, including the appointment of lords lieutenant in Greater Manchester and Merseyside.
Lancaster the county town of Lancashire, England, is on the River Lune and has a population of 52,234.

Greater Manchester

Greater Manchester, EnglandManchesterCounty of Greater Manchester
The historic county was subject to a significant boundary reform in 1974 which created the current ceremonial county and removed Liverpool and Manchester, and most of their surrounding conurbations to form the metropolitan and ceremonial counties of Merseyside and Greater Manchester.
It is landlocked and borders Cheshire (to the south-west and south), Derbyshire (to the south-east), West Yorkshire (to the north-east), Lancashire (to the north) and Merseyside (to the west).

History of Lancashire

Lancashiresince the early 12th centuryhistoric boundaries of Lancashire
The history of Lancashire begins with its founding in the 12th century.
However the new Lancashire gained control of the Forest of Bowland and West Craven areas formerly under the administration of the West Riding of Yorkshire.

County town

administrative centrecounty townscounty seat
The county palatine boundaries remain the same as those of the pre-1974 county with Lancaster serving as the county town, and the Duke of Lancaster (i.e. the Queen) exercising sovereignty rights, including the appointment of lords lieutenant in Greater Manchester and Merseyside.
For example, Lancaster is the county town of Lancashire, but the county council is located in Preston.

Merseyside

Merseyside, EnglandCounty of MerseysideMSY
The historic county was subject to a significant boundary reform in 1974 which created the current ceremonial county and removed Liverpool and Manchester, and most of their surrounding conurbations to form the metropolitan and ceremonial counties of Merseyside and Greater Manchester.
Merseyside spans 249 sqmi of land which border Lancashire (to the north-east), Greater Manchester (to the east), Cheshire (to the south and south-east) and the Irish Sea to the west.

Cotton mill

cotton spinning millcotton millsmill
Liverpool and Manchester grew into its largest cities, with economies built around the docks and the cotton mills respectively. Accrington, Blackburn, Bolton, Burnley, Bury, Chorley, Colne, Darwen, Manchester, Nelson, Oldham, Preston, Rochdale and Wigan were major cotton mill towns during this time.
The cotton mill, originally a Lancashire phenomenon, was copied in New England and later in the southern states of America.