Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Lancaster CountyLancasterLancaster CountiesLancaster County, PALancaster, PA MSALancaster County lineLancaster, PA Metropolitan Statistical AreaRohrerstownChristiana ResistanceChristiana incident
Lancaster County, (Pennsylvania German: Lengeschder Kaundi) sometimes nicknamed the Garden Spot of America or Pennsylvania Dutch Country, is a county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.wikipedia
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Lancaster, Pennsylvania

LancasterLancaster, PALancaster City
Its county seat is Lancaster.
Lancaster is a city located in South Central Pennsylvania which serves as the seat of Pennsylvania's Lancaster County and one of the oldest inland towns in the United States.

Dauphin County, Pennsylvania

Dauphin CountyDauphinDauphin Counties
As settlement increased, six other counties were subsequently formed from territory directly taken, in all or in part, from Lancaster County: Berks (1752), Cumberland (1750), Dauphin (1785), Lebanon (1813), Northumberland (1772), and York (1749).
The county was created ("erected") on March 4, 1785, from part of Lancaster County and was named after Louis-Joseph, Dauphin of France, the first son of king Louis XVI.

York County, Pennsylvania

York CountyYorkYork Counties
As settlement increased, six other counties were subsequently formed from territory directly taken, in all or in part, from Lancaster County: Berks (1752), Cumberland (1750), Dauphin (1785), Lebanon (1813), Northumberland (1772), and York (1749).
The county was created on August 19, 1749, from part of Lancaster County and named either after the Duke of York, an early patron of the Penn family, or for the city and county of York in England.

Berks County, Pennsylvania

Berks CountyBerksReading, PA Metropolitan Statistical Area
As settlement increased, six other counties were subsequently formed from territory directly taken, in all or in part, from Lancaster County: Berks (1752), Cumberland (1750), Dauphin (1785), Lebanon (1813), Northumberland (1772), and York (1749).
Reading developed during the 1740s when the inhabitants of northern Lancaster County sent several petitions requesting that a separate county be established.

Chester County, Pennsylvania

Chester CountyChesterChester Counties
Lancaster County was part of Chester County, Pennsylvania, until May 10, 1729, when it was organized as the colony's fourth county.
The fourth county in the state, Lancaster County, was formed from Chester County on May 10, 1729.

Northumberland County, Pennsylvania

Northumberland CountyNorthumberlandNorthumberland County line
As settlement increased, six other counties were subsequently formed from territory directly taken, in all or in part, from Lancaster County: Berks (1752), Cumberland (1750), Dauphin (1785), Lebanon (1813), Northumberland (1772), and York (1749).
The county was formed in 1772 from parts of Lancaster, Berks, Bedford, Cumberland, and Northampton Counties and named for the county of Northumberland in northern England.

Cumberland County, Pennsylvania

Cumberland CountyCumberlandCumberland Counties
As settlement increased, six other counties were subsequently formed from territory directly taken, in all or in part, from Lancaster County: Berks (1752), Cumberland (1750), Dauphin (1785), Lebanon (1813), Northumberland (1772), and York (1749).
The General Assembly (legislature) of the Pennsylvania colony on January 27, 1750, created Cumberland County from Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, naming it for Cumberland, England.

Columbia, Pennsylvania

ColumbiaColumbia, PAColumbia Borough, Pennsylvania
Starting in mid-1730, Thomas Cresap, acting as an agent of Lord Baltimore, began confiscating the newly settled farms near present-day Peach Bottom and Columbia, Pennsylvania (at the time this was not named, but it was first called "Wright's Ferry", as noted on map).
Columbia, formerly Wright's Ferry, is a borough (town) in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, 28 miles (45 km) southeast of Harrisburg on the east (left) bank of the Susquehanna River, across from Wrightsville and York County and just south of U.S. Route 30.

Caernarvon Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Caernarvon TownshipCaernarvonCaernarvon Township, Pennsylvania
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Caernarvon Township is a township in northeastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Warwick Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Warwick TownshipWarwickWarwick Township, Lancaster County
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Warwick Township is a township in north central Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Sadsbury Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Sadsbury TownshipSadsburySadsbury Twp.
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Sadsbury Township is a township in east central Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Peach Bottom, Pennsylvania

Peach BottomPeach Bottom (Lancaster County)Peach Bottom Ferry
Starting in mid-1730, Thomas Cresap, acting as an agent of Lord Baltimore, began confiscating the newly settled farms near present-day Peach Bottom and Columbia, Pennsylvania (at the time this was not named, but it was first called "Wright's Ferry", as noted on map).
Peach Bottom, Pennsylvania is an unincorporated village in Fulton Township, Lancaster County, in the state of Pennsylvania in the United States.

Salisbury Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Salisbury TownshipSalisburySalisbury Township, Pennsylvania
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Salisbury Township is a township in east central Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Willow Street, Pennsylvania

Willow StreetWillow Street, PA
This was about halfway between present-day Lancaster and the town of Willow Street, Pennsylvania.
Willow Street is a census-designated place (CDP) in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Lancaster Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Lancaster TownshipLancasterLancaster Township, Lancaster County
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Lancaster Township is a civil township of Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, in the United States.

Manheim Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Manheim TownshipManheimLancaster
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Manheim Township is a township in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania established in 1729, which southernmost border meets the city limits of Lancaster.

Earl Township, Lancaster County, Pennsylvania

Earl TownshipEarl
The names of the original Lancaster County townships reflect the diverse national origins of settlers in the new county: two had Welsh names (Caernarvon and Lampeter), three had Native American names (Cocalico, Conestoga and Peshtank or Paxton), six were English (Warwick, Lancaster, Martic, Sadsbury, Salisbury and Hempfield); four were Irish (Donegal, Drumore, Derry, and Leacock), reflecting mostly Scots-Irish (or Ulster Scots) from Ulster, a province in the north of Ireland; Manheim was German, Lebanon came from the Bible, a basis of all the European cultures; and Earl was a translation of the German surname of Graf or Groff.
Earl Township is a township in northeastern Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Wheatland (James Buchanan House)

WheatlandPresident James Buchanan's WheatlandWheatland Estate
His home Wheatland is now operated as a house museum in Lancaster.
Wheatland, or the James Buchanan House, is a brick, Federal style house outside of Lancaster, Pennsylvania, in Lancaster Township, Lancaster County.

Amish

Old Order AmishAmish CommunityThe Amish
The County of Lancaster is a popular tourist destination, with its Amish community a major attraction.
Many eventually settled in Lancaster County.

Pennsylvania

PACommonwealth of PennsylvaniaPa.
Lancaster County, (Pennsylvania German: Lengeschder Kaundi) sometimes nicknamed the Garden Spot of America or Pennsylvania Dutch Country, is a county located in the south central part of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania.
Pennsylvania German is still very vigorous as a first language among Old Order Amish and Old Order Mennonites (principally in the Lancaster County area), whereas it is almost extinct as an everyday language outside the plain communities, though a few words have passed into English usage.

Christiana, Pennsylvania

Christiana
His slaves Noah Buley, Nelson Ford, George Ford, and Joshua Hammond, fearing his bad temper, fled across the Mason–Dixon line to the farm of William Parker, a mulatto free man and abolitionist who lived in Christiana, Pennsylvania.
Christiana is a borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States.

Ephrata, Pennsylvania

EphrataBorough of Ephrata Electric DivisionEphrata Area Joint Authority
Ephrata (Pennsylvania German: Effridaa) is a borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, United States, 38 mi south east of Harrisburg and about 57 mi west by north of Philadelphia.

Octoraro Creek

West Branch Octoraro CreekEast Branch Octoraro CreekOctoraro
They included hiding places with trap doors, hidden vaults, a cave, and one with a brick tunnel leading to Octoraro Creek, a tributary of the Susquehanna.
The East Branch and Octoraro Creek form the southern half of the border between Lancaster and Chester counties until the creek crosses the Mason-Dixon line.

Akron, Pennsylvania

Akron
The Mennonite Central Committee in Akron supports relief in disasters and provides manpower and material to local organizations in relief efforts.
Akron is a borough in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.

Ephrata Cloister

Ephrata CommunitySeventh-Day Dunkers
In addition to the Ephrata Cloister, the United Brethren in Christ and the Evangelical United Brethren (EUB) trace their beginnings to a 1767 meeting at the Isaac Long barn, near the hamlet of Oregon, in West Lampeter Township.
The Ephrata Cloister or Ephrata Community was a religious community, established in 1732 by Johann Conrad Beissel at Ephrata, in what is now Lancaster County, Pennsylvania.