A report on Landform

This conical hill in Salar de Arizaro, Salta, Argentina called Cono de Arita constitutes a landform.
Karst towers landforms along Lijiang River, Guilin, China

Natural or artificial land feature on the solid surface of the Earth or other planetary body.

- Landform
This conical hill in Salar de Arizaro, Salta, Argentina called Cono de Arita constitutes a landform.

15 related topics with Alpha

Overall

A photograph of Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972. A processed version became widely known as The Blue Marble.

Earth

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Third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

Third planet from the Sun and the only astronomical object known to harbor life.

A photograph of Earth taken by the crew of Apollo 17 in 1972. A processed version became widely known as The Blue Marble.
Planetary disk of a star, the inner ring has a radius equal to Earth and the Sun
Artist's impression of earth during the Archean eon, showing falling meteor, erupting volcano, round stromatolites, and barren landscape
Earth topological map, the area is redder if it is raised higher in real-life
Global map of heat flow from Earth's interior to the surface
Earth's major plates, which are: · ·  ·  ·  ·
Satellite picture of Upsala Glacier, showing mountains, icebergs, lakes, and clouds
Schematic of Earth's magnetosphere, with the solar wind flows from left to right
Earth's rotation imaged by Deep Space Climate Observatory, showing axis tilt
Illustration of the Earth, Earth's orbit, the Sun and the four seasons
Earth's axial tilt and its relation to the rotation axis and planes of orbit
Earth-Moon system seen from Mars
A model of Vanguard 1, the oldest human-made object in Earth orbit
Water is transported to various parts of the hydrosphere via the water cycle
Top of Earth's blue-tinted atmosphere, with the Moon at the background
Fungi are one of the kingdoms of life on Earth.
The seven continents of Earth:
Earth's land use for human agriculture
Change in average surface air temperature since the industrial revolution, plus drivers for that change. Human activity has caused increased temperatures, with natural forces adding some variability.
Earthrise, taken in 1968 by William Anders, an astronaut on board Apollo 8
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Hubble Space Telescope seen in orbit from Space Shuttle Atlantis
Processes leading to movements and phase changes in Earth's water
Tracy Caldwell Dyson in the Cupola module of the International Space Station observing the Earth below

The remaining 29.2%, or 148.94 e6km2, not covered by water has terrain that varies greatly from place to place and consists of mountains, deserts, plains, plateaus, and other landforms.

Coastal dunes in De Panne, Belgium

Dune

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Coastal dunes in De Panne, Belgium
Coastal dunes at the Yyteri Beach in Pori, Finland
Cadiz Dunes Wilderness
Sand dunes of the Empty Quarter to the east of Liwa Oasis, United Arab Emirates
Sand hitting sand is more likely to stick; sand hitting a more coherent surface is more likely to bounce (saltation). This exacerbating feedback loop helps sand accumulate into dunes.
Isolated barchan dunes on the surface of Mars. Dominant wind direction would be from left to right.
Schematic of coastal parabolic dunes
Reversing dune showing short minor slipface atop the major stoss (upwind) face
Dune Nine in Sossusvlei, Namibia, is over 300m high.
Coastal dunes covered in grasses around the mouth of the Liver Å river in Denmark
Sand dunes of Hyypänmäki in Hailuoto, Finland
Gypsum dune fields, White Sands National Park, New Mexico, United States
Cross-bedding in lithified aeolian sand dunes preserved as sandstone in Zion National Park, Utah
Sand blowing off a crest in the Kelso Dunes of the Mojave Desert, California, USA
A dune in Sossusvlei, in the greater Namib-Naukluft National Park, Namibia. Note the trees being engulfed for scale.
Camelthorn trees and bushes scattered on dunes in the Kalahari Desert in Namibia (2017)
Sand dune in the Libyan Desert near Dakhla Oasis at sunset.
Wind ripples on crescent-shaped sand dunes (barchans) in southwest Afghanistan (Sistan)
Fronting the Mediterranean Sea in Oliva, Valencian Community, Spain
50 m tall dune in Salir do Porto, Portugal
Sand dunes of Lemnos, Greece
Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes
Cadiz Dunes Wilderness, California
White sand dunes in the Lençóis Maranhenses National Park, Maranhão, Brazil
Sand dune on Mars
Rub' al Khali (Arabian Empty Quarter) sand dunes imaged by Terra (EOS AM-1). Most of these dunes are seif dunes. Their origin from barchans is suggested by the stubby remnant "hooks" seen on many of the dunes. Wind would be from left to right.
Large linear seif dunes in the Great Sand Sea in southwest Egypt, seen from the International Space Station. The distance between each dune is 1.5–2.5 km.
The average-direction-longitudinal model of seif dune formation
alt=Transverse dune with wind blowing across crest|By contrast, transverse dunes form with the wind blowing perpendicular to the ridges, and have only one slipface, on the lee side. The stoss side is less steep.
alt=Animation of wind pushing transverse dunes along. The sand blows from the stoss side down onto the less side, where it is buried by the next layer. The dune thus moves, and a cross-section through it shown diagonal cross-bedding|Transverse dunes lie perpendicular to the wind, which moves them forwards, producing the cross-bedding shown here.

A dune is a landform composed of wind- or water-driven sand.

USGS topographic map of Stowe, Vermont with contour lines at 20-foot intervals

Terrain cartography

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Depiction of the shape of the surface of the Earth on a map, using one or more of several techniques that have been developed.

Depiction of the shape of the surface of the Earth on a map, using one or more of several techniques that have been developed.

USGS topographic map of Stowe, Vermont with contour lines at 20-foot intervals
From a 1639 map of Hispaniola by Johannes Vingboons, showing use of hill profiles
Section of Raisz' 1941 map of the Northwestern United States, showing his style of landform illustration.
Web version of Patterson's Physical Map of the Coterminous United States featuring plan oblique relief. Note the appearance of the Rocky Mountains in the full-size version.
Dufour map of Bern (1907); this is a shaded hachure map.
Siegfried map of Bernina Pass (1877) with black, blue and brown contour lines at 30-meter intervals
Top: map of Lake Mead area.
Bottom: the same map with sun shading.
Zion National Park, Utah, showing the effect of multi-directional hillshading. Left: one light source, standard northwest azimuth; Middle: average of two light sources, northwest + vertical; Right: average of 32 light sources from all directions but concentrated in the northwest, each with shadows added. Note the decreasing starkness, increasing realism, and increasing clarity of cliffs, canyons, and mountains in this area of over 1,000 m of local relief.
Map of Crater Lake National Park, Oregon, using texture mapping to subtly indicate vegetation cover
An illustration of the resolution bumping technique of shaded relief, Bitterroot Mountains and Salmon River, Montana/Idaho. Left: 200 m resolution shaded relief, middle: shaded relief after 7000 m smoothing filter, right: 65%/35% mix. The original image looks uniformly rugged, while the one on the right emphasizes the larger mountains and canyons.
1618 oblique map of Paris by Claes Jansz. Visscher.
Hand-made raised-relief map of the High Tatras in scale 1: 50 000
A landscape rendered in Outerra

Erwin Raisz further developed, standardized, and taught this technique, which uses generalized texture to imitate landform shapes over a large area.

Map of Cape Cod showing shores undergoing erosion (cliffed sections) in yellow, and shores characterized by marine deposition (barriers) in blue.

Deposition (geology)

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Map of Cape Cod showing shores undergoing erosion (cliffed sections) in yellow, and shores characterized by marine deposition (barriers) in blue.
Figure 1. Illustrating the sediment size distribution over a shoreline profile, where finer sediments are transported away from high energy environments and settle out of suspension, or deposit in calmer environments. Coarse sediments are maintained in the upper shoreline profile and are sorted by the wave-generated hydraulic regime
Figure 2. Map of Akaroa Harbour showing a fining of sediments with increased bathymetry toward the central axis of the harbour. Taken from Hart et al. (2009) and the University of Canterbury under the contract of Environment Canterbury.

Deposition is the geological process in which sediments, soil and rocks are added to a landform or landmass.

Glossary of landforms

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Landforms are categorized by characteristic physical attributes such as their creating process, shape, elevation, slope, orientation, rock exposure, and soil type.