Landlord

landlordslandladylicensed victuallerlandownershipland baronlicenseePomeschikpub landlordlandownerlicensed victuallers
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).wikipedia
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Leasehold estate

tenantsleaseholdtenant
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).
A leasehold estate is an ownership of a temporary right to hold land or property in which a lessee or a tenant holds rights of real property by some form of title from a lessor or landlord.

Lease

leasinglesseeleases
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).
The modern law of landlord and tenant in common law jurisdictions retains the influence of the common law and, particularly, the laissez-faire philosophy that dominated the law of contract and property law in the 19th century.

Pub

public housepubspublic houses
The manager of a pub in the United Kingdom, strictly speaking a licensed victualler, is referred to as the landlord/lady.
The landlord of a tied pub may be an employee of the brewery—in which case he/she would be a manager of a managed house—or a self-employed tenant who has entered into a lease agreement with a brewery, a condition of which is the legal obligation (trade tie) only to purchase that brewery's beer.

Peter Rachman

RachmanismRachmanRachmanite
*Peter Rachman was a landlord who operated in Notting Hill, London in the 1950s and until his 1962 death.
Perec "Peter" Rachman (1919 – 29 November 1962) was a Polish-born landlord who operated in Notting Hill, London, England in the 1950s and early 1960s.

Rental agreement

leaselease agreementlease agreements
A rental agreement, or lease, is the contract defining such terms as the price paid, penalties for late payments, the length of the rental or lease, and the amount of notice required before either the homeowner or tenant cancels the agreement.
When renting real estate, the person(s) or party who lives in or occupies the real estate is often called a tenant, paying rent to the owner of the property, often called a landlord (or landlady).

Eviction

evictedevictevictions
State law and, in some places, city law or county law, sets the requirements for eviction of a tenant.
Eviction is the removal of a tenant from rental property by the landlord.

Property management

real estate managementestate managementmanagement
Many owners hire a property management company to take care of all the details of renting their property out to a tenant.
Companies or individual landlords who accept tenancy deposits for "assured shorthold tenancies" (the usual form of residential tenancy) are required by statute to be members of a Tenancy Deposit Scheme.

Housing Act 1988

1988
A Possession Order under the most common type, the Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) is usually obtainable after eight weeks/two months of unpaid rent, and at the court's discretion after serving the tenant with a Section 8 notice (under the Housing Act 1988 as amended) for a lesser period for all assured tenancies — and on other grounds which defer to the landlord's ownership of the property.
It governs the law between landlords and tenants.

Section 8 notice

A Possession Order under the most common type, the Assured Shorthold Tenancy (AST) is usually obtainable after eight weeks/two months of unpaid rent, and at the court's discretion after serving the tenant with a Section 8 notice (under the Housing Act 1988 as amended) for a lesser period for all assured tenancies — and on other grounds which defer to the landlord's ownership of the property.
Section 8, also known as the Section 8 notice to quit or the Section 8 possession notice, is a prerequisite if the landlord of an assured tenancy wishes to obtain possession order from the court, thereby ending the tenancy, for a reason based on a circumstance entitling the landlord to possession.

Renting

rentrentedrental
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter). Net income (yield) and capital growth from letting (renting out) particularly in leveraged buy to let, is subject to idiosyncratic risk, which is considered objectively intensified for a highly leveraged investor limited to a small number of similar profile homes, of narrow rental market appeal in areas lacking economic resilience.
A gross lease is when the tenant pays a flat rental amount and the landlord pays for all property charges regularly incurred by the ownership.

Building superintendent

superintendentsupercaretaker
The superintendent or resident manager may report to the landlord or a property manager for any problem outside his or her control.

Tenement (law)

tenanttenementtenants
The thing held is called a tenement, the holder is called a tenant, the manner of his holding is called a tenure, and the superior is called the landlord, or lord of the fee.

Idiosyncrasy

idiosyncraticidiosyncrasiesidiosyncratic risk
Net income (yield) and capital growth from letting (renting out) particularly in leveraged buy to let, is subject to idiosyncratic risk, which is considered objectively intensified for a highly leveraged investor limited to a small number of similar profile homes, of narrow rental market appeal in areas lacking economic resilience.
Net income received, or losses suffered, by a landlord from renting of one or two properties is subject to idiosyncratic risk due to the numerous things that can happen to real property and variable behavior of tenants.

House

housingdwellingsresidence
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).

Apartment

apartment buildingflatsflat
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).

Condominium

condocondominiacondos
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).

Real estate

real-estateluxury real estateland
A landlord is the owner of a house, apartment, condominium, land, or real estate which is rented or leased to an individual or business, who is called a tenant (also a lessee or renter).

Juridical person

legal entityjuristic personlegal entities
When a juristic person is in this position, the term landlord is used.

Female

femalesfeminine
The term landlady may be used for female owners, and lessor may be used regardless of gender.

Gender

gender issuessexgenders
The term landlady may be used for female owners, and lessor may be used regardless of gender.

United Kingdom

BritishUKBritain
The manager of a pub in the United Kingdom, strictly speaking a licensed victualler, is referred to as the landlord/lady.

Feudalism

feudalfeudal systemfeudal lord
The concept of a landlord may be traced back to the feudal system of manoralism (seignorialism), where a landed estate is owned by a Lord of the Manor (mesne lords), usually members of the lower nobility which came to form the rank of knights in the high medieval period, holding their fief via subinfeudation, but in some cases the land may also be directly subject to a member of higher nobility, as in the royal domain directly owned by a king, or in the Holy Roman Empire imperial villages directly subject to the emperor.

Manorialism

manormanorsmanorial
The concept of a landlord may be traced back to the feudal system of manoralism (seignorialism), where a landed estate is owned by a Lord of the Manor (mesne lords), usually members of the lower nobility which came to form the rank of knights in the high medieval period, holding their fief via subinfeudation, but in some cases the land may also be directly subject to a member of higher nobility, as in the royal domain directly owned by a king, or in the Holy Roman Empire imperial villages directly subject to the emperor.

Landed property

landed estatelanded proprietorlanded
The concept of a landlord may be traced back to the feudal system of manoralism (seignorialism), where a landed estate is owned by a Lord of the Manor (mesne lords), usually members of the lower nobility which came to form the rank of knights in the high medieval period, holding their fief via subinfeudation, but in some cases the land may also be directly subject to a member of higher nobility, as in the royal domain directly owned by a king, or in the Holy Roman Empire imperial villages directly subject to the emperor.

Lord of the manor

lords of the manorlordlordship of the manor
The concept of a landlord may be traced back to the feudal system of manoralism (seignorialism), where a landed estate is owned by a Lord of the Manor (mesne lords), usually members of the lower nobility which came to form the rank of knights in the high medieval period, holding their fief via subinfeudation, but in some cases the land may also be directly subject to a member of higher nobility, as in the royal domain directly owned by a king, or in the Holy Roman Empire imperial villages directly subject to the emperor.